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Forum topic by Jim Jakosh posted 11-12-2018 05:45 PM 1660 views 0 times favorited 40 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jim Jakosh

22882 posts in 3525 days


11-12-2018 05:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource

I am in need of a 60 degree 1/8” shank cutter for a Dremel for thread cutting in wood on my metal lathe.

I have some of these cutters ( below) from Kent’s Tools in Tucson but they are about a 30 degree angle and he cannot get a 60 degree version.

Does any one know of a source for such a bit (1/8” shank, 60 degree V and about 1/2” diameter head) in HSS or carbide?

Thanks, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!


40 replies so far

View rance's profile

rance

4271 posts in 3580 days


#1 posted 11-12-2018 06:41 PM

https://www.chefwarekits.com/ez-threading-pro-xl-jig-thread-cutter/ez-threading-pro-60-degree-cutter-hss.html

EZ Threading Pro 60 Degree Cutter (HSS)

Product Code: 570
Availability: In Stock

$29.95

They are used on the EZ Threading jigs they sell.

Rance

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9950 posts in 1558 days


#2 posted 11-12-2018 09:51 PM

Is this for cutting internal or external threads Jim?

If internal, I don’t know of anything. The bit rance linked would work if you have a way to grind the shank down to fit your Dremel.

If cutting external threads, could you turn the dremel so it’s perpendicular to the lathe axis and use a 60 degree v-bit to cut the threads?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

25450 posts in 4270 days


#3 posted 11-13-2018 12:30 AM

Jim, I purchased a similar tool from a US address
use-enco.com
400 Nevada Pacific Hwy., Fernley, NV 89408
800-USE-ENCO (800-873-3626)
email : [email protected]

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

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bushmaster

3670 posts in 2702 days


#4 posted 11-13-2018 04:21 AM

Interesting, great mind think alike. I had been looking for a cutter to cut threads on the metal lathe for wood boxes etc. by using the metal lathe thread cutting gears I reasoned I could cut any thread. Only trouble is I could not find a cutter. Sounds like they are available. Let me know if you find a good source. I would rather have a 1/4 inch shank. The first reply is 3/8.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

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Jim Jakosh

22882 posts in 3525 days


#5 posted 11-13-2018 01:33 PM

Thanks Rance. That would work if it were a 1/8” shank. I’m using a Dremel in place of a too bit.

Hi Kenny, I want to do both on the same piece. I can turn the parts on my wood lathe and then change the bushing in the back of the chuck to 1 1/2”-8 and put it on my Southbend lathe for threading. I have done that for several projects but I always get some chip out from the scraping action of the tool bit in wood…and sometimes I scrap out the piece if it is too bad. i have carefully turned 1/4” shanks down to 1/8” but for this, that shank might be hardened and quite heavy on the business end for a 1/8” shank.

Hi Tony ..Thanks. I just sent Enco an E mail with pictures. I’m also checking with Production Tool here in GR tomorrow

Hi Brian..we sure do think alike. I’ll bet you are using a die grinder with a 1/4” shank. I guess it would with my V block holder, so I could to.
On of my LJ and guild buddies sent me this video of the threading jig and I gave it some thought and then I said, said I , I already have a big threading tool I just need a high speed rotary tool bit.
Here is the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Muw0zP6elg

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View GR8HUNTER's profile (online now)

GR8HUNTER

6219 posts in 1132 days


#6 posted 11-13-2018 03:09 PM

you guys are

SUPER DOOPER :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1558 days


#7 posted 11-13-2018 03:18 PM



...
Hi Tony ..Thanks. I just sent Enco an E mail with pictures. I m also checking with Production Tool here in GR tomorrow
...

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

In case you don’t get a response, Enco is no more sadly. They were purchased by MSC some years back and eventually absorbed entirely. I imagine your message will be forwarded to MSC customer service. But, you can also have a look at MSC's website in the meantime.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Jim Jakosh

22882 posts in 3525 days


#8 posted 11-13-2018 04:48 PM

Thanks, Kenny . I’ll do that. I didn’t know they are no more. Enco always had some good reasonably priced tools!! I bought my mill vise from them many years ago!

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1558 days


#9 posted 11-13-2018 04:52 PM

Yep, a lot of machinists were sad to see Enco go away. They sold a lot of good tooling at fair prices. When you didn’t need a Starrett, an Enco would do! MSC has some good values too but it’s a lot harder to sift through their massive catalog…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Jim Jakosh

22882 posts in 3525 days


#10 posted 11-13-2018 08:01 PM

You’re right , Kenny. I have an older one and it is 1 1/2” thick. I find most of the stuff I need on E bay..tools, cutters, belts bearings..etc so I don’t go the MSC much. I can’t find that cutter on there, though

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

10645 posts in 4472 days


#11 posted 11-13-2018 08:28 PM


Thanks Rance. That would work if it were a 1/8” shank. I m using a Dremel in place of a too bit.

Hi Kenny, I want to do both on the same piece. I can turn the parts on my wood lathe and then change the bushing in the back of the chuck to 1 1/2”-8 and put it on my Southbend lathe for threading. I have done that for several projects but I always get some chip out from the scraping action of the tool bit in wood…and sometimes I scrap out the piece if it is too bad. i have carefully turned 1/4” shanks down to 1/8” but for this, that shank might be hardened and quite heavy on the business end for a 1/8” shank.

Hi Tony ..Thanks. I just sent Enco an E mail with pictures. I m also checking with Production Tool here in GR tomorrow

Hi Brian..we sure do think alike. I ll bet you are using a die grinder with a 1/4” shank. I guess it would with my V block holder, so I could to.
On of my LJ and guild buddies sent me this video of the threading jig and I gave it some thought and then I said, said I , I already have a big threading tool I just need a high speed rotary tool bit.
Here is the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Muw0zP6elg

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

Jim, don’t you have an extra Router sitting around doing nothing?

That bit that Rance found looks good to me… Bummer on the 3/8” shank needing a Collet too! Why didn’t they make a more standard 1/4” shank bit?

That Youtube video looks great and it looks SO SIMPLE!!

I wonder if one could use a coarser Threaded Rod to cut more Heavy Duty Threads… using the same bit?

Looks REALLY GOOD!!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: https://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/index.php

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9950 posts in 1558 days


#12 posted 11-13-2018 08:38 PM



You re right , Kenny. I have an older one and it is 1 1/2” thick. I find most of the stuff I need on E bay..tools, cutters, belts bearings..etc so I don t go the MSC much. I can t find that cutter on there, though

Cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

Yeah me either. I didn’t look for too long but wasn’t having any luck. The 1/8” shank is probably the killer.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1558 days


#13 posted 11-13-2018 09:13 PM

This has been bugging me Jim because it’s very likely I’ll want a similar tool. So I figured, if you can’t buy it, make it! I also figured that if I need to make it, somebody else probably already has. And done it better…

I was right :-) Here’s a method to make an ID/OD thread tool that’s pretty simple from O1 drill rod. You could pretty easily turn it on the lathe then just grind the head if you don’t have the means to mill it. He makes this to use as a turning tool but if you ground one of the tips off for clearance, I don’t see why you couldn’t spin it in a dremel. It would be a single point tool but if you’re cutting wood, that’s probably fine.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

25450 posts in 4270 days


#14 posted 11-13-2018 10:52 PM

Yes I thought it was a bit strange the Enco website did not come up.
Jim, here is a link to my thread cutting jig.
.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/221306

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

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Jim Jakosh

22882 posts in 3525 days


#15 posted 11-13-2018 11:12 PM

Hi Joe, that 8 TPI on the shaft is pretty coarse already. I was thinking of using about 11 1/2 TPI like the PVC pi;e threads.

Hi Kenny, the 1/8” shank is the stopper. I might have to go to a 1/4” die grinder. Funny you should say that about making one. I have a design drawn out today with a 60 degree head with 3 holes in it like the one flue countersinks with a hole through them. I’m going out to buy the tool steel tomorrow if they can’t get me one at Production Tool ( same place I buy the steel)

Hi Tony, that is quite a setup you have and it looks like it works super!! Nice looking threads. I made those hand tools but the different woods do not cut clean and can ruin a nice piece.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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