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Plunge V cuts with skew

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Forum topic by JoshNZ posted 11-12-2018 06:41 AM 643 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JoshNZ

131 posts in 1465 days


11-12-2018 06:41 AM

Topic tags/keywords: skew chisel v cut grooves

A link below in case it’s not clear what I’m talking about, at minute 3.25.

https://youtu.be/lOELuHLk98E

I wondered if you guys consider this a dangerous cut. I.e. if you were on your last piece of expensive wood making a Christmas gift on Christmas Eve, would you be doing your Vs like this, or shaving down each side separately like most do?

I thought I had it nailed but after changing wood species I’m back to getting the odd catch so I don’t know.


5 replies so far

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Wildwood

2657 posts in 2530 days


#1 posted 11-12-2018 11:36 AM

No, don’t think its dangerous if practice with lot of scrap wood first. Have no experience with an oval skew but with conventional skews whether traditional or radius bevel all about riding the bevel or bevel contact and tool control.

Have never used an oval skew but have several different size conventional skews and one 1/4” round skew. Own and use from 1/4” through 11/4” skews depending upon size of the blank. If get in trouble might resort back to my 3/8” or 1/2” spindle gouges but never on V cuts whether using heel or toe.

You can see Raffan in this video doesn’t have complete bevel contact through out the cut when cutting V’s. When goes to turning beads stays on the bevel. This old exercise dates back to 1920 or 1930’s in old turning books and still demonstrated today.

https://www.finewoodworking.com/2007/01/19/turning-beads-with-a-skew-chisel

More detailed explanation:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfeLAHQSbqk

Found it easier to learn better tool control using my 1/2” skew. Could never get complete row of of beads described in books and videos using a skew or spindle gouge but came close. Also may use a 3/8” or 1/2” spindle gouge to make V cuts.

-- Bill

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LeeMills

664 posts in 1697 days


#2 posted 11-12-2018 03:28 PM

I agree with Bill but I do not see a need to do it unless you are in production work. I like the skew and I would not try it without a lot of practice.
IIRC an early Raffan (VHS about mid 80-’s) shows the move but it was impossible, with the speed Raffan worked, to slow down a VHS enough to see exactly what he was doing.

I’m not sure where in the Raffan video Bill linked to shows lack of bevel control. There is a gap higher up on the blade but it appears the bevel is still rubbing at the point. If the bevel touched higher up you would get a run-back.

In Batty’s video at about 9:35 he states “just past 12:00”. I did not watch the entire video again but I believe at one point he stated “30 seconds past 12:00”, or as close as you can get without touching it.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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JoshNZ

131 posts in 1465 days


#3 posted 11-12-2018 08:19 PM

I do very much like the skew too but I would by lieing if I said I hadn’t destroyed one or two pieces with it in the final stages. Seems alot of videos ive watched on the skew, the turner gets an accidental catch too at some point. The versatility and finish is worth the practice though I think.

Right now I only have an oval skew but I’m looking at buying another rolled edge flat skew. Any idea of width, as a good place to start?

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Wildwood

2657 posts in 2530 days


#4 posted 11-13-2018 11:46 AM

JMHO, would recommend any brand M2 HSS 1/2” rolled or square edge skew even though don’t have any idea of what you like to turn or size of current skew. Trip to the grinder easy to roll edges on all four sides.

A ½” skew lot lighter and easier to control whatever cut trying to make parting off & peeling making a tenon: planing to make a straight smooth surface or taper on spindles: V-cuts mark off design elements: cutting beads & coves on spindles.

I still get a dig in with a skew when not paying attention even with years of experience.

-- Bill

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LeeMills

664 posts in 1697 days


#5 posted 11-13-2018 02:51 PM

Ask X number of turners and you will get X +2 answers.
I like a larger skew myself. It has been years since I used any under 1”; my favorite being a 1” Sorby with the blade worn down to about 4” long.
I also use a 1-1/2” re-purposed from a Crown bowl skew that they had on sale for $40.
I did roll the long edges but I prefer a straight 70° bevel and not a radiused one for the cutting edge.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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