LumberJocks

Trying a new table saw blade - Leuco

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by bluephi1914 posted 11-12-2018 02:35 AM 518 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View bluephi1914's profile

bluephi1914

93 posts in 1781 days


11-12-2018 02:35 AM

Took a chance on this blade and I must say that I have been impressed. New, it Cuts just as good as my frued and diablo blades. Carbide has plenty of meat of them and the blade is solid. I needed something for plywood and still can’t bring myself to pay $125+ r the Forrester blades even though I’m sure they’re worth every penny and then some. After I get some usage out of this blade I will purchase a combo and a rip blade. German steel, German company, but they have a factory in Georgia code to my house that I stumbled upon. They take walk in purchases and phone orders. Blade was less than $70

-- Jack of all trades and a master of most of them.


6 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8680 posts in 2999 days


#1 posted 11-12-2018 02:38 AM

Looks like a lot of carbide for the money, wise purchase I’d say.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3744 days


#2 posted 11-12-2018 03:04 AM

Leuco is a higher end tooling company that caters to mostly industrial customers. They are similar to Everlast, Leitz, Popular and Royce Ayr. They tend to have very large carbide teeth for many sharpenings but some of the blades from less industrial facing companies offer better finish but usually less beefy teeth. Obviously, there are tradeoffs for each option. In the end, Leuco makes excellent tooling.

View bluephi1914's profile

bluephi1914

93 posts in 1781 days


#3 posted 11-12-2018 03:39 AM



Leuco is a higher end tooling company that caters to mostly industrial customers. They are similar to Everlast, Leitz, Popular and Royce Ayr. They tend to have very large carbide teeth for many sharpenings but some of the blades from less industrial facing companies offer better finish but usually less beefy teeth. Obviously, there are tradeoffs for each option. In the end, Leuco makes excellent tooling.

- AHuxley

Ok, good info to know. What other brands were you speaking of that might produce a better cut? Royce and lietz?

-- Jack of all trades and a master of most of them.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3744 days


#4 posted 11-12-2018 04:49 AM


Ok, good info to know. What other brands were you speaking of that might produce a better cut? Royce and lietz?

- bluephi1914

Actually, it is the less industrial blades that will sometimes leave a better cut. For example, the Freud Premier Fusion may give the best crosscutting finish of any general purpose table saw blade due to their low clearance side grinds. The negative to that is they will loose their very sharp edge quickly as a result and require more frequent sharpening to maintain that level of cut. Most industrial tooling leans toward giving a good enough finish for a very long period of time vs an exceptional finish for a short period of time. As a hobbyists I often find myself chasing the best possible finish off a machine when it doesn’t impact the final product, large commercial endeavors are concerned about good enough at each stage (due to money) even if their final finish is equal or better than mine. Their approach is smarter. In the end the Leuco will probably cost you much less per cut than a Freud Industrial line, Forrest or Ridge Carbide over its life but there may be a short time when new or after sharpening the best from those brands may have an advantage in cut quality but not one that translates to a higher quality end result.

Bottom line I think you will be very happy.

View recon49's profile

recon49

16 posts in 427 days


#5 posted 11-12-2018 05:32 AM

Nice choice. You can’t go wrong with Leuco!

View bluephi1914's profile

bluephi1914

93 posts in 1781 days


#6 posted 11-12-2018 04:45 PM

Ok, good info to know. What other brands were you speaking of that might produce a better cut? Royce and lietz?

- bluephi1914

Actually, it is the less industrial blades that will sometimes leave a better cut. For example, the Freud Premier Fusion may give the best crosscutting finish of any general purpose table saw blade due to their low clearance side grinds. The negative to that is they will loose their very sharp edge quickly as a result and require more frequent sharpening to maintain that level of cut. Most industrial tooling leans toward giving a good enough finish for a very long period of time vs an exceptional finish for a short period of time. As a hobbyists I often find myself chasing the best possible finish off a machine when it doesn t impact the final product, large commercial endeavors are concerned about good enough at each stage (due to money) even if their final finish is equal or better than mine. Their approach is smarter. In the end the Leuco will probably cost you much less per cut than a Freud Industrial line, Forrest or Ridge Carbide over its life but there may be a short time when new or after sharpening the best from those brands may have an advantage in cut quality but not one that translates to a higher quality end result.

Bottom line I think you will be very happy.

- AHuxley

Gotcha, If I can continue getting this quality of cut from this blade for an extended amount of time then I’ll go with this brand exclusively;

The cut quality is awesome and I hope it can hold its edge for as long as the frued or Forrest and other top brands.

If it does then it’s a win

-- Jack of all trades and a master of most of them.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com