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Modifying switch on a dust collector?

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Forum topic by SweetTea posted 11-11-2018 04:17 PM 428 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SweetTea

438 posts in 1078 days


11-11-2018 04:17 PM

Ok so i have a 3HP 220v Grizzly dust collector that i keep on an upstairs loft in my shop that way I can have my trunk lines easily overhead. It has been working great, I just get tired of walking up the stairs to turn it on and off. I have 6 machines connected to this thing so it gets used a lot. My question is, what is a good way to cheaply add a switch down stairs that turns this thing on and off without having to walk all the way upstairs to do so? Keep in mind this is a 3HP 220v machine. I was thinking that I could get some 12/2 wire and put a receptical on one end and a standard light switch on the other end and then plug the dust collector into it. Would this work? If so, are there any down sides to doing so? The wire would only need to be 7-8 foot in length as my dust collector sits on an open ledge on the second story and I could just run the wire straight down on the outside of the wall.


9 replies so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

2668 posts in 2225 days


#1 posted 11-11-2018 04:26 PM

Where is your power panel, perhaps install switch on line coming out of the panel or in line?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

735 posts in 1521 days


#2 posted 11-11-2018 05:02 PM

Something like this might be the easiest solution for you.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

438 posts in 1078 days


#3 posted 11-11-2018 05:18 PM



Where is your power panel, perhaps install switch on line coming out of the panel or in line?

- Andre

I thought about that but the problem is that the line that I run my dust collector off of also powers my air compressor. Of course I only run one at a time but it’s a good distance from my breaker box so when I need my compressor I just unplug one and plug in the other. So I would prefer not to place the switch in line or use the breaker to power on the unit. Would my idea of just taking a 12/2 wire and putting a 20a 220v receptical on one end and a switch on the other, then have a line going from the switch to the main line not work?

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5210 posts in 4379 days


#4 posted 11-11-2018 05:29 PM

Have ya thought about a remote switch?

-- [email protected]

View WorksInTheory's profile

WorksInTheory

177 posts in 2021 days


#5 posted 11-11-2018 06:16 PM

Hi I have easy solve for you as I had this same issue. For like 12 bucks you can get one of those remote controllers and 3 outlet receptacles to control. You don’t plug the DC directly into these bc it will blow the fuse in it but you plug a contactor into it and then plug the DC to the contactor. All the contactor is is a trip switch that interrupts the electricity or not which you will now control with the remote. You leave the DC on but you trip the contactor if that makes sense.

Also you can then control 2 other things like shop lights or a shop vac etc.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5585 posts in 2912 days


#6 posted 11-11-2018 06:37 PM

What he said^^^. The contactor will be an industrial piece of equipment that won’t fail. Just wire the coil to a switch and the switch will then activate the contactor. If you want a detailed explanation on how to do one with a remote check this. Just substitute a switch for the remote and you’re in business.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View BattleRidge's profile

BattleRidge

111 posts in 635 days


#7 posted 11-11-2018 06:57 PM

The switch for my dust collector was in an inconvenient spot so I simply took the switch & box off the DC and relocated it to a spot on the wall where it was much easier to access. I then ran wire to a receptacle on the wall adjacent to the DC. I installed a junction box at the original switch location on the DC and simply joined the wires for the plug and the motor together and plugged it in.

I have a 15 amp breaker at the breaker box (which in plenty for my 2hp Grizzly DC) but ran 12 gauge wire from the breaker box to the switch so there wouldn’t be any concern about power drop through the 60 +/- feet of wire, then used 14 gauge wire for the 10’ between the switch and receptacle. The power cord that came with the DC is only 14 or so gauge. You should be fine with using 12 gauge, which is what I have on all of my other equipment (3hp bandsaw, planer, etc.).

I only have a couple bucks invested in the conversion which was for the junction box. Also, I like having the switch permanently affixed in an easy to access spot and while there may be some advantages to a portable remote switch, I always know where my switch is and don’t have to worry about misplacing it or dead batteries. Then again, while I have a 30’ x 40’ x 10’h shop, I keep my actual woodworking space relatively compact so it works well in my individual set-up.

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

595 posts in 2633 days


#8 posted 11-12-2018 04:27 AM

Battleridge’s solution is probably the cheapest to implement. Just need some wire and a junction box.

The remotes are easiest and depending on how you cost your time, might be cheaper as well in the long run.

The switch to contactor strategy will work as well and it’s what I use in my home brew dust bin shut off. But once again, the cost of the parts plus the time probably puts you in pre-built remote range anyway.

Let us know what you decide.
Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

View toolie's profile

toolie

2158 posts in 3047 days


#9 posted 11-12-2018 10:37 AM


Where is your power panel, perhaps install switch on line coming out of the panel or in line?

- Andre

I thought about that but the problem is that the line that I run my dust collector off of also powers my air compressor. Of course I only run one at a time but it’s a good distance from my breaker box so when I need my compressor I just unplug one and plug in the other. So I would prefer not to place the switch in line or use the breaker to power on the unit. Would my idea of just taking a 12/2 wire and putting a 20a 220v receptical on one end and a switch on the other, then have a line going from the switch to the main line not work?

- SweetTea

In a word, yes, a switched receptacle will work.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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