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Forum topic by tsbot posted 11-07-2018 12:04 AM 680 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tsbot

52 posts in 990 days


11-07-2018 12:04 AM

I have two coats of gloss wipe on poly applied over 2 coats danish oil. Last coat went on a week ago. My wife doesn’t like the gloss finish. I told her I’d take care of it since I wanted a 3rd coat anyway. I bought a satin wipe on poly for the last coat (Watco).

Question 1:

Can I just apply another gloss finish let it cure for a few days then buff with oooo steel wool and finish with Johnson’s paste wax to dull the gloss down. I’ve read paste wax over poly is pointless.

Question 2:

Just apply the satin and accept that’s what she wants and it’s a project for her. Is it ok that I let 2nd coat sit for 10 days – I can still sand with 220 then apply the satin as normal?

Question 3:
My 2nd coat has nibs and feels rough – if my 3rd coat cures like that (rough feeling on your hand) what do I do to make it smooth like the wood initially was after the final sanding and coat of danish oil?

Thanks!!!


24 replies so far

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

56 posts in 538 days


#1 posted 11-07-2018 12:14 AM

I would lightly sand with 400 and use satin

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2375 days


#2 posted 11-07-2018 01:28 AM



I would lightly sand with 400 and use satin

- Sludgeguy


+1 If you don’t have them, the festool foam sanding pads ($.69 ea) are cheap and work great. I keep a stash of a few grits for this.

Another issue I can see. You jointer is awful. You should wrap it up, put it on a pallet and send it to the address I am sending you. Stick to hand planes. I will find a use for the jointer.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View tsbot's profile

tsbot

52 posts in 990 days


#3 posted 11-07-2018 02:36 AM

I would lightly sand with 400 and use satin

- Sludgeguy

+1 If you don t have them, the festool foam sanding pads ($.69 ea) are cheap and work great. I keep a stash of a few grits for this.

Another issue I can see. You jointer is awful. You should wrap it up, put it on a pallet and send it to the address I am sending you. Stick to hand planes. I will find a use for the jointer.

- BroncoBrian

Thank you both. I’m going to do one more coat of satin poly then finish this weekend. Haha on the Jointer – just picked it up last week – need to do a full setup and rotate the helix cutters. I’m pretty stoked. Got a good 50” straight edge from lee valley being delivered today. The wood whisperer has a setup video I plan on watching a hundred times. Can’t wait to use it!

View John_'s profile

John_

206 posts in 2122 days


#4 posted 11-07-2018 03:09 AM

I am not sure if it is me or if it is the pics – but it does not look like you have enough finish applied?

If you lightly sand the surface (320 or higher) do you get rid of all the shiny spots?

View tsbot's profile

tsbot

52 posts in 990 days


#5 posted 11-07-2018 04:14 AM



I am not sure if it is me or if it is the pics – but it does not look like you have enough finish applied?

If you lightly sand the surface (320 or higher) do you get rid of all the shiny spots?

- John_H

Just 2 coats poly and 2 coats danish oil. It’s well covered but will prob do one more coat.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

616 posts in 327 days


#6 posted 11-07-2018 06:40 AM

Nice looking tabletop, If your doing the finishing in the shop, you could be getting wading dust falling onto your finish. On my tabletops I apply 5 coats.

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

554 posts in 1035 days


#7 posted 11-07-2018 02:10 PM

Wipe on poly does not build much with each coat. I’d go for 5-6 coats. BTW, you can take gloss to satin with 0000 steel wool. I’m also a hand work guy, so I remove nibs by lightly scraping with a single edge razor blade held vertically.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

9178 posts in 2745 days


#8 posted 11-07-2018 02:16 PM

FWIW, I agree with your wife. The high gloss distracts from what is otherwise a very nice looking top.

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9909 posts in 1555 days


#9 posted 11-07-2018 02:24 PM

I agree with the wife too, that will look much nicer with the sheen knocked back a bit IMO.

First, I feel like 220 is a bit coarse to be sanding with between coats. I usually opt for more like 400 or maybe 320 at the most. Personally, I used to do as you plan by setting the sheen with the final coat. But, I’ve found that it’s just as effective to use full gloss for all coats then knock back the sheen with a very fine wet/dry paper or steel wool. I think one way is as effective as the other but the latter method means I only have to have one can of poly on hand.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2375 days


#10 posted 11-07-2018 02:35 PM



I am not sure if it is me or if it is the pics – but it does not look like you have enough finish applied?

If you lightly sand the surface (320 or higher) do you get rid of all the shiny spots?

- John_H

I agree with you John. For a gloss finish, it is too thin. You can see smooth gloss areas and valleys. The satin will resolve that.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View tsbot's profile

tsbot

52 posts in 990 days


#11 posted 11-07-2018 02:59 PM

Thank you all! Back to work – I’ll add a few more coats before knocking the sheen down. Appreciate all the reply’s.

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

220 posts in 414 days


#12 posted 11-07-2018 03:12 PM

I Noticed that no one has mentioned wet sanding the surface with 400 or finer black sandpaper. You can get a “baby-butt smooth surface” this way. Also, That is a really nice looking table top. Be proud.

I like to use gloss and buff/sand it to satin for the final coat but I have never used the wipe on products. I use a fine china bristle brush and thin the coating until it slides out and doesn’t leave brush strokes. I use the same technique with oil paint on painted surfaces.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View Sark's profile

Sark

130 posts in 776 days


#13 posted 11-07-2018 03:26 PM

Rubbing down the finish is pretty much the cats meow, if you want that baby-skin smooth texture. It doesn’t really matter if your final coat is gloss or satin, the finish will still benefit from that final rub-down either with 0000 steel wool or finishing pads. When I had a spray booth, the finishes came out quite dust free and smooth with a professional look. We weren’t going to take the time for hand work. But when we did do a final rub-out those cabinets doors always looked and felt better.

I agree with DBDesigns that wet sanding with 400 or finer sandpaper is a great treatment. I usually start rubbing out with 600 grit, then 1000, 2000 and 4000. I use Abralon pads on my orbital sander, though I just as often sand things out by hand. Sometimes, if the finish is pretty smooth, I would just do the final rub starting with 2000 grit. Abralon pads are fabulous, they last a long time. I think your piece would benefit from a few more coats of finish, since wipe-on finishes are so thin. But definitely sand between the coats with a hard block so the highs and knocked down a bit, and the lows are raised up. 320 or 400 grit would be good for this.

Old finisher’s trick is to have all the under-coats be gloss (for brilliance) and the final coat satin. That gives a nice depth without the work of rubbing out the final gloss coat to satin. But then, you’re going to rub it out anyway, so gloss is just fine for all the coats. In fact, I think that final coat should be gloss. That way, you get total control of the final sheen. If you want more gloss, just rub out with finer pads (say 8000 grit), or less sheen, use 4000 grit or 2000 grit.

Wax will give that final touch that you will and your wife will absolutely love. I wax all pieces. Waxing over poly is just fine, done it thousands of times. But what wax? I suggest brown colored paste wax. It goes on thin, adds a just a bit more depth, and of course smoothness. If there are large open grains in your piece, then the paste wax will stick in the grains and be more difficult to rub off. If those cases, I use McGuires detailing liquid available at any auto-parts store. Absolutely clear, super thin, water-proof, high-tech detailing solution designed for cars is a super useful item to finish off your project or any other woodworking project. I gave a bottle of detailing liquid to all my customers, because they always wanted to know, how do I clean and wax the wood in this brand-new cabinet? Detailing liquid from the auto-parts store is the answer. It never gums up, doesn’t build thickness, is easy to apply. Give it a try.

Cheers.

View John_'s profile

John_

206 posts in 2122 days


#14 posted 11-07-2018 05:04 PM

I will have to look at “Abralon” pads, but here is something I have been using even when I spray – Trizact sand paper. It comes in handy when your spraying say the front of a face frame and you get some overspray that dries rough on the adjacent side

I use the 3000 grit (they have up to 5000) and I first came across Trizact in one of those ‘headlight’ polishing kits. It has like a foam backing and works great for ‘damp’ wet sanding and the piece is big enough to fit into a hand block sander.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2122 posts in 3859 days


#15 posted 11-07-2018 05:48 PM

I agree with several comments. #1 you probably could use more coats because wipe on is very thin. So for better durability I would add two or three more. #2 The rub down of any finish will improve the results. I often use 0000 steel wool and a carnauba type paste wax as a final rub to remove any dust tips and to just burnish the finish to a satin texture. Wait at least 72 hours before applying the wax to give the finish time to cure

If it has been more than about 72 hours since the last top coat was applied I would lightly sand it with 320 sand paper before applying the next coat to make sure you get a good bond.

-- Les B, Oregon

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