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Joining Two 45 Degree Miter Cuts to Make 90 Degree

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Forum topic by thecrus8r posted 11-05-2018 04:09 PM 3019 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thecrus8r

10 posts in 423 days


11-05-2018 04:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: joinery waterfalledge entrywaytable help wood woodworking table

Greetings,

I am having an issue joining 45 degree miter cuts to make a “waterfall” edge entryway table. I made the cuts, verified they are 45 degrees, but they will not join properly. What am I doing wrong? Is there something I can do to make this entryway table sit flush? The pictures provided are 90 degrees on the outside and inside of the table. I have access to a full shop, so maybe using the miter saw wasn’t the best option. Table saw? Besides the standard table saw miter gauge it comes with, I don’t have a crosscut sled or anything.

Please see the images for reference.

Thank you!


18 replies so far

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Steve

1511 posts in 1037 days


#1 posted 11-05-2018 04:35 PM

How did you verify that they were 45?

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thecrus8r

10 posts in 423 days


#2 posted 11-05-2018 04:38 PM

I used the miter gauge from my table saw and set it on the cut, it read 45 degrees.

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HokieKen

10426 posts in 1593 days


#3 posted 11-05-2018 04:42 PM

Yeah, that ^ Either your angles aren’t 45s or it isn’t sitting at 90s now. Unless geometry has changed a lot since I graduated ;-)

But, here’s my advice… don’t worry about whether they are actually 45 or not. Pick either the legs or the top and start trimming up the miter to fit the other one and form a right angle. Doesn’t really matter if the angles are 45/45 or if they’re 46/44, it’ll look fine. If it were me, I’d fine tune the fit with a block plane.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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thecrus8r

10 posts in 423 days


#4 posted 11-05-2018 04:52 PM

Thanks, Kenny. I will look into your idea regarding the block plane. I used the miter saw, instead of the table saw, because the top piece is 6 feet and would have been really difficult to maintain an accurate cut without a crosscut sled.

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Rick Dennington

6602 posts in 3649 days


#5 posted 11-05-2018 05:29 PM

You need to make a miter sled for your projects that require cutting 45’s…..Maybe a small one for small projects, and a larger one for….well…you get the picture……!! A miter sled makes all the difference with using the table saw……. Here’s a small one I made for my saw……!! I have a bigger one for larger stock….!!

-- " At my age, happy hour is a 2 hour nap".....!!

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thecrus8r

10 posts in 423 days


#6 posted 11-05-2018 06:05 PM

That type of sled would definitely be beneficial in the future, but the type of stock that I am working with, I don’t think that’ll work too well.

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Gerald Thompson

1221 posts in 2689 days


#7 posted 11-05-2018 06:32 PM

The boards also have to be the exact same length, e,g, the two longer one the same and the two shorter. I use shooting boards to square and get exact 45’s. Look up mule’s ear. The would plane to 45d on flat ends. They were worth the one time effort to make for me.

-- Jerry

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John Smith

1924 posts in 617 days


#8 posted 11-05-2018 07:00 PM

one of the best investments you can make for your table saw
would be a Digital Angle Gauge with a magnetic base.
it will stick to the saw blade to give you the correct angle you need.
BUT – the saw’s table must be perfectly level for it to work properly.
(I would not have used the miter saw).

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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000

2859 posts in 1353 days


#9 posted 11-05-2018 07:03 PM

BUT – the saw s table must be a perfectly level for it to work properly.

- John Smith


That’s what the zero button is for.

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therealSteveN

3385 posts in 1028 days


#10 posted 11-05-2018 09:01 PM

“I have access to a full shop, so maybe using the miter saw wasn’t the best option”

Most of your answers have been TS oriented, so maybe they agree. I find it really hard to get really sweet cuts on a chop saw, so I do use the TS for miters that count, you get a lot more control. Your cuts here once you figured how you were going to figure for length of your pieces, a stop on the miter guage fence is what I would do, unless they are longer than 3’

Using a cube, like the Wixey Zero it out on your saw table, hang it on the blade, and crank it around to 45* Make the cuts smoothly, but don’t dally around, a nice slow stroke while holding the work, or better yet clamping it to your fence on the miter gauge, or you will meet Mr Creep.

Do that and see if they aren’t tighter.

-- Think safe, be safe

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thecrus8r

10 posts in 423 days


#11 posted 11-05-2018 10:15 PM



“I have access to a full shop, so maybe using the miter saw wasn’t the best option”

Most of your answers have been TS oriented, so maybe they agree. I find it really hard to get really sweet cuts on a chop saw, so I do use the TS for miters that count, you get a lot more control. Your cuts here once you figured how you were going to figure for length of your pieces, a stop on the miter guage fence is what I would do, unless they are longer than 3

Using a cube, like the Wixey Zero it out on your saw table, hang it on the blade, and crank it around to 45* Make the cuts smoothly, but don t dally around, a nice slow stroke while holding the work, or better yet clamping it to your fence on the miter gauge, or you will meet Mr Creep.

Do that and see if they aren t tighter.

- therealSteveN

The entire project is based on 3in x 12in lumber, the legs are 3ft and the top is 6ft. I am sure I would be able to use the 3ft legs on the table saw, but I really don’t know how to go about the 6ft top with the table saw.

Thoughts?

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clin

1051 posts in 1450 days


#12 posted 11-05-2018 10:52 PM

When you say “lumber” are you referring to construction lumber (which it sort of looks to be)? That is it’s own problem. If it is construction lumber, it may have more internal stresses than a good quality of properly dried furniture grade lumber. So even if you make a perfect cut, the wood will move and won’t even maintain the same angle across the cut. Making an initial rough cut, then just trimming the last bit will help.

But in any case, if the wood is not flat to start (construction lumber won’t be). Then it is never likely to work well short of hand fitting the piece. Even then, if the wood is not dried, then a perfect fit today won’t be perfect tomorrow. It can change overnight. So, once the pieces fit well, I’d join them immediately. But again, if the wood is not dried completely, none of this will matter. The joint will likely pull apart as the wood dries.

If the wood is good quality and properly dried, then I’d do test cuts on scraps until the angle is just what you need. Then make the final cuts on the finished pieces.

-- Clin

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therealSteveN

3385 posts in 1028 days


#13 posted 11-05-2018 11:06 PM

6 foot stuff, and larger is jumping from bring the work to the tool, and going into bring the tool to the work territory. You mentioned waterfall table earlier so I’m thinking Track saw. Not sure about them all, but the big 3 all will tilt 45* and they reference off the tilt, crisp clean cuts rip or crosscut. Easy peasy. Huge cash outlay if you don’t have one though.

-- Think safe, be safe

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bandit571

23435 posts in 3137 days


#14 posted 11-05-2018 11:48 PM

Maybe just a circular saw…tilted to 45 degrees….guided across the grain with a speed square-like guide clamped to the boards….

Something like this?

Trimmed the bottom edges of two panels, so they would match each other, and be square. In your case, set the guide to the motor side of the saw, after you tilt the saw to 45 degrees. Mark your cut line…measure from to “outside” of the blade towards the fence location…square a line across to set the guide to. Run the saw through the cut, keeping pressure on the saw to ride against the guide.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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jutsFL

182 posts in 295 days


#15 posted 11-06-2018 02:48 AM


The boards also have to be the exact same length, e,g, the two longer one the same and the two shorter. I use shooting boards to square and get exact 45 s. Look up mule s ear. The would plane to 45d on flat ends. They were worth the one time effort to make for me.

- Gerald Thompson

Thats what ive found for my picture frame frustrations. The miters can all be 45s, but if the opposing sides are not EXACTLY the same length – it will be off.

My guess is that if you are 100% sure all miters are at 45deg, then your 2 opposing legs are indeed not the same length. Worth taking a quick peek at.

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

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