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Glue removal tip wanted...

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Forum topic by jutsFL posted 11-03-2018 03:41 PM 994 views 0 times favorited 54 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jutsFL

172 posts in 261 days


11-03-2018 03:41 PM

Topic tags/keywords: glue removal

Hi everyone!
Ive got the excesive dried glue problem with my walnut panel. Normally (as I am a new woodworker) id just go to town with my RO sander. I’m hoping that someone has a tip on how to (easily?) remove the excess from the joint areas before the real sanding begins. Maybe a scraper on the areas, or would a carefully used solvent work?

Open to any ideas. This will be the top of a coffee table.

-Jay

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL


54 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5316 posts in 2729 days


#1 posted 11-03-2018 03:55 PM

You answered you own question. Card scraper. Also a good way to fix any minor miss alignments between boards.

https://youtu.be/PM-5WPl63wc

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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jutsFL

172 posts in 261 days


#2 posted 11-03-2018 04:25 PM

Thank you!
Being new, like a year in new, I dont even know the real names of the tools to know what to search for.

...is a card scraper of any functional difference than the handled paint scrapers I already own?

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16142 posts in 3038 days


#3 posted 11-03-2018 04:28 PM

Card scraper, paint scraper, either can work if shaped and sharpened properly. Yes, scrape before sanding is a great approach.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Andybb

1932 posts in 1023 days


#4 posted 11-03-2018 04:52 PM

Card/cabinet scraper videos

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Rich

4564 posts in 1009 days


#5 posted 11-03-2018 05:13 PM

I like to wait until the glue has just dried and you don’t see any wet glue down in the center of the bead and then slice it off with a chisel plane. It’s important not to wait until it’s fully hardened though. A stiff putty knife with a chisel edge will work too.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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Andre

2672 posts in 2225 days


#6 posted 11-03-2018 05:16 PM

I have a lot of old plane blades after switching all my Stanley’s to PMV-11 irons and found the old irons make excellent glue scrappers.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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GR8HUNTER

6220 posts in 1132 days


#7 posted 11-03-2018 05:26 PM

after first hour …. use your paint scraper then….. so it will easily come off :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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jutsFL

172 posts in 261 days


#8 posted 11-03-2018 05:46 PM

I just had the time to watch the first linked video, this is beautiful! Absolutely perfect , and exactly what I needed – thanks AlaskaGuy, and everyone for that matter.

...with the glue up I used (face referenced my dining table for flatness) I could not get to the glue on the face as it dried to scrape ahead of time. Live and learn I suppose.

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

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Richard

11274 posts in 3452 days


#9 posted 11-03-2018 09:26 PM



I have a lot of old plane blades after switching all my Stanley s to PMV-11 irons and found the old irons make excellent glue scrappers.

- Andre

Andre +1 Great Idea

Rick S.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1325 posts in 2372 days


#10 posted 11-03-2018 09:56 PM



I just had the time to watch the first linked video, this is beautiful! Absolutely perfect , and exactly what I needed – thanks AlaskaGuy, and everyone for that matter.

...with the glue up I used (face referenced my dining table for flatness) I could not get to the glue on the face as it dried to scrape ahead of time. Live and learn I suppose.

- jutsFL

Yeh, that is the nature of the beast. I would imagine that you had some sort of plastic down to protect the table and the squeeze out got spread out pretty thin between the piece and the plastic.

First, a “great idea” commendation for using your dining room table as an assembly table. Second, a “most understanding spouse” commendation (if you are married) to whoever actually allowed you to do this. My wife is very understanding and supportive, but trust me, there ain’t no glue-ups happening on our dining room table!

The good news is that the squeeze out looks pretty limited and thin. I have found that if I get everything in place, lightly draw up the clamps, then tighten up a bit on the cauls before the final clamping pressure is applied most of the squeeze out is directed upwards (at least it seems that way). I do tend to use more cauls on a piece that size.

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jutsFL

172 posts in 261 days


#11 posted 11-04-2018 12:24 AM


I just had the time to watch the first linked video, this is beautiful! Absolutely perfect , and exactly what I needed – thanks AlaskaGuy, and everyone for that matter.

...with the glue up I used (face referenced my dining table for flatness) I could not get to the glue on the face as it dried to scrape ahead of time. Live and learn I suppose.

- jutsFL

Yeh, that is the nature of the beast. I would imagine that you had some sort of plastic down to protect the table and the squeeze out got spread out pretty thin between the piece and the plastic.

First, a “great idea” commendation for using your dining room table as an assembly table. Second, a “most understanding spouse” commendation (if you are married) to whoever actually allowed you to do this. My wife is very understanding and supportive, but trust me, there ain t no glue-ups happening on our dining room table!

The good news is that the squeeze out looks pretty limited and thin. I have found that if I get everything in place, lightly draw up the clamps, then tighten up a bit on the cauls before the final clamping pressure is applied most of the squeeze out is directed upwards (at least it seems that way). I do tend to use more cauls on a piece that size.

- Kazooman

The dining table reference worked very well for the flatness of the panel… But had obvious shortcomings :)

...and, yes, my wife is wildly leniant with the stuff I get away with from this borderline obsession with woodworking. Not only was I able to use the table, but it remained there overnight – with my mother in law visiting at the time !

Appreciate the tip as well. Ive noticed very quickly from the gentleman I buy my lumber from in town – 10sec worth if a mans thoughts thats been doing this for a lifetime, is equivelent to roughly 7 days of profanity filled blunders in the garage :)

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

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chrisstef

17935 posts in 3426 days


#12 posted 11-04-2018 12:49 AM

Fwiw i keep a deck of playing cards in the shop to use on squeeze out. Theyre stiff enough to run right along the joint with a lil curl to em to keep the wet glue on top of.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8320 posts in 3217 days


#13 posted 11-04-2018 03:34 PM

........... or you could use hide glues and clean up with water.

Just sayin’

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Rich's profile

Rich

4564 posts in 1009 days


#14 posted 11-04-2018 04:15 PM


........... or you could use hide glues and clean up with water.

Just sayin

- shipwright

Glad you mentioned this. Besides easy cleanup, it can save your butt sometimes as well. Once I glued the dovetailed sides of a drawer to the front only later realizing I’d forgotten to cut the grooves for the drawer bottom. With PVA, I’d have had to scrap it and start over, but having used hide glue, I was able to separate the parts in about 10 minutes with a moist cloth and heat gun. Cleaning the joints for re-gluing was easy too.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5316 posts in 2729 days


#15 posted 11-04-2018 04:21 PM

I have ask this before but no one ever answers. What is the open time of Hide Glue. Can it be varied. Right now I have the impression hide glue give you abut a minute of open time. Such a short open time seems problematic.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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