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Forum topic by EdsCustomWoodCrafts posted 10-30-2018 05:54 PM 649 views 1 time favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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EdsCustomWoodCrafts

922 posts in 1728 days


10-30-2018 05:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tear out dadoes grooves avoid tear out

Regarding the above pic.. I am creating trivets on the tablesaw using a 1/2” Dado stack.. the design has alternating dadoes and grooves

I am getting a lot of tear out in the inner part of the trivet and I am wondering should a cut with the grain first and then across the grain to minimize the tear out..

Before you ask I am using a ZCI and miter fence to back the cuts up.. it’s taking a lot of sanding in hard to reach places and I am using a 1/2” sanding block to remove a ton of tear out…

Any suggestions would be welcomed!!!

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown” . Come check out my website for more about what I make and how at www.edscustomwoodcrafts.com


18 replies so far

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

515 posts in 2117 days


#1 posted 10-30-2018 06:05 PM

I think taking light passes and providing support when possible (e.g. backing up the cut) are all you can really do to minimize tearout.

To cleanup the cut, how about a dado cleanout bit in a router?

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HokieKen

9480 posts in 1523 days


#2 posted 10-30-2018 06:22 PM

ZCI isn’t going to do any good in the center areas where the grooves and dadoes intersect. The best solution that comes to mind to prevent the tearout altogether would be to cut some strips of MDF that are the same size as your dadoes/grooves. Cut the dadoes on one side and carpet tape mdf strips in. The cut the grooves on the same side. Carpet tape strips in. Flip board and repeat. Sounds like a PITA but if you precut the strips to be a tight fit, it’s less of a pain than sanding :-)). Using this method would leave all of your cuts backed up with sacrificial material and should greatly reduce if not eliminate the issue.

The other option that springs to mind would be to make scoring cuts along the edges of where each groove/dado will go then go back with the dado stack to finish it. As long as your scoring blade is sharp and close to the final depth of the dados it should be effective in improving the cut quality at the edges.

I suppose this goes without saying but using a quality dado stack that is clean and sharp is the most important step to improving the cut quality…

Finally, I really like that trivet design! Very elegant but also a simple design to execute. That’s the kinda stuff that makes people money ;-) I wouldn’t be surprised if something similar ends up under my Christmas tree for someone.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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bondogaposis

5397 posts in 2736 days


#3 posted 10-30-2018 06:33 PM

I bet most of the tear out occurs during the crosscut. Crosscut first then rip.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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pottz

5216 posts in 1369 days


#4 posted 10-30-2018 06:37 PM



I bet most of the tear out occurs during the crosscut. Crosscut first then rip.

- bondogaposis


i agree and as ken said a good quality sharp dado set will help a lot.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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EdsCustomWoodCrafts

922 posts in 1728 days


#5 posted 10-31-2018 04:05 PM

Thanks guys appreciate all the great tips .. I think I’ll try the score cut first and then do a final pass .. it will take slightly more time but worth it on the end truly hate sanding

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown” . Come check out my website for more about what I make and how at www.edscustomwoodcrafts.com

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jeffgao

10 posts in 238 days


#6 posted 10-31-2018 04:21 PM

Maybe also consider a shoulder plane to clean up the dado bottoms.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5933 posts in 3198 days


#7 posted 10-31-2018 04:59 PM

Crosscut dados first, then do the dados with the grain. That will only help to a degree.
The biggest improvement you can make is to use a dado set with a high tooth count. Standard dado chipper blades have 2 teeth. Premium dado blades have chippers with 4-6 teeth. Plus the outer blades need about 24 teeth for a really fine cut.

I struggled with dado tearout until I purchased an Infinity Dadonator set. Other brands are good as well, but I think tooth count is important to consider when buying a dado stack.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5536 posts in 2878 days


#8 posted 10-31-2018 05:03 PM

You already have good advice, so i just want to say how much I like that design….really cool!

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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EdsCustomWoodCrafts

922 posts in 1728 days


#9 posted 11-01-2018 07:06 PM

Thanks guys I took all the advise I could on this I first made a score cut on all the dadoes and grooves maybe 3/16” deep in the first pass and I also did all the cross cut or against the grain and then ran the slots with the grain and after all that I had little to no tear out— so happy all I need to do is some finish sanding

Here is the picture pre finish

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown” . Come check out my website for more about what I make and how at www.edscustomwoodcrafts.com

View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

922 posts in 1728 days


#10 posted 11-02-2018 12:05 AM



You already have good advice, so i just want to say how much I like that design….really cool!

- Fred Hargis


Thanks I think so to way easierr to make than Router cut grooves

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown” . Come check out my website for more about what I make and how at www.edscustomwoodcrafts.com

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EdsCustomWoodCrafts

922 posts in 1728 days


#11 posted 11-02-2018 12:09 AM



Crosscut dados first, then do the dados with the grain. That will only help to a degree.
The biggest improvement you can make is to use a dado set with a high tooth count. Standard dado chipper blades have 2 teeth. Premium dado blades have chippers with 4-6 teeth. Plus the outer blades need about 24 teeth for a really fine cut.

I struggled with dado tearout until I purchased an Infinity Dadonator set. Other brands are good as well, but I think tooth count is important to consider when buying a dado stack.

- pintodeluxe

Looks like s quality Dado stack just outside my budget right now I am using 8” Freud

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown” . Come check out my website for more about what I make and how at www.edscustomwoodcrafts.com

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Eric

79 posts in 258 days


#12 posted 11-02-2018 12:13 AM

Lots of good ideas here.

Great looking project, and using a dato set would be the way to go, for speed and to turn out a bunch in a short time. Great Christmas gifts.

-- Eric, Upstate South Carolina

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1316 posts in 2337 days


#13 posted 11-02-2018 12:19 AM

I also like the design and I think I will give it a try. Always fun to try a new technique.

It looks like you have softened the edges of the individual blocks. Is that the case? If so, did you use a router? Hand held or table? Even the edges down in the slots appear to be softened. Sand paper? A file?

What species of wood did you use? The first person who suggests using alder is going to get a smack!

View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

922 posts in 1728 days


#14 posted 11-02-2018 12:23 AM


I also like the design and I think I will give it a try. Always fun to try a new technique.

It looks like you have softened the edges of the individual blocks. Is that the case? If so, did you use a router? Hand held or table? Even the edges down in the slots appear to be softened. Sand paper? A file?

What species of wood did you use? The first person who suggests using alder is going to get a smack!

- Kazooman

Hello and thanks yes I softened the inside edges using a sanding block tilted at an angle.. the outside edges received a 1/4” roundover profile at the router table … this species I used is white oak but have also used red birch on previous trivets

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown” . Come check out my website for more about what I make and how at www.edscustomwoodcrafts.com

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1316 posts in 2337 days


#15 posted 11-02-2018 02:25 AM

I also like the design and I think I will give it a try. Always fun to try a new technique.

It looks like you have softened the edges of the individual blocks. Is that the case? If so, did you use a router? Hand held or table? Even the edges down in the slots appear to be softened. Sand paper? A file?

What species of wood did you use? The first person who suggests using alder is going to get a smack!

- Kazooman

Hello and thanks yes I softened the inside edges using a sanding block tilted at an angle.. the outside edges received a 1/4” roundover profile at the router table … this species I used is white oak but have also used red birch on previous trivets

- EdsCustomWoodCrafts

Thanks for the quick response. Based on my stash I think I would be stuck with red oak or I will have to make a run to Woodcraft or the lumber yard to get an appropriate piece of stock. The square ones look so simple with just two settings of the fence, but the result is really impressive. The first impression you get is that the trivet was made by stacking individual blocks.

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