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what is this joint called?

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Forum topic by harum posted 10-29-2018 10:14 PM 1054 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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harum

364 posts in 2063 days


10-29-2018 10:14 PM

Was wondering if anyone could direct me to a book or other resource where a joint like this one below is explained:

It is used to attach front legs to a seat frame on upholstered Maloof chairs. The “rocker” notch-and-rabbet Maloof joint is never used for upholstered seats, probably due to insufficient depth of the seat rails.

Any comment or reference would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, h.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."


9 replies so far

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Dark_Lightning

3469 posts in 3529 days


#1 posted 10-29-2018 10:50 PM

I’d call it a pegged round dado, but I’m sure that there is a fancier name for it.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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harum

364 posts in 2063 days


#2 posted 10-29-2018 11:34 PM


I d call it a pegged round dado, but I m sure that there is a fancier name for it.

- Dark_Lightning

:) A round pegged dado? It probably worked because back then people were a bit slimmer.

Does this mean that this joint can be done just by drilling a cylindrical channel, then cutting it open, then gluing in a turned leg of the same diameter, then pegging/screwing it?

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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Dark_Lightning

3469 posts in 3529 days


#3 posted 10-30-2018 01:52 AM

While the edges of the seat surround are rounded over, the part underneath where the leg is could potentially be flat and riding on a corresponding flat on the leg. The leg could look something like this, but hidden by the side of the seat. It isn’t a design that I would want people rocking back in the chair, raising it on the back legs.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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harum

364 posts in 2063 days


#4 posted 10-30-2018 03:10 PM

Thank you, DL! Yes, doesn’t look strong either way. Still, it was used for majority of front legs on Maloof upholstered chairs and benches I could see in online furniture galleries.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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jmos

916 posts in 2790 days


#5 posted 10-30-2018 03:59 PM

I’d bet the ‘peg’ is hiding a screw head. Just like the rocker joint.

I’m not sure why it couldn’t be a shallower version of a regular Maloof rocker joint. If you have a source saying it isn’t, I’m not disputing it, but it looks like it could be.

I agree, it doesn’t look like the strongest of joints, but not all chairs are made to withstand abuse. Many formal dining room chairs have some pretty thin members, and I wouldn’t advise rocking back on two legs in them either.

-- John

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harum

364 posts in 2063 days


#6 posted 10-30-2018 05:40 PM


...
I m not sure why it couldn t be a shallower version of a regular Maloof rocker joint. If you have a source saying it isn t, I m not disputing it, but it looks like it could be.
...
- jmos

John, yes, there seems to be no reason for a shallower Maloof joint not working for seat frames. Never seen one though. The question would be the minimum seat rail depth then. 2”? In a Maloof rocker joint, the seat is notched 7/8” deep and 2” wide, then also rabbeted 1/2” deep and about 1/2” high, then sculpted further. For a frame seat, just the notching and rabbeting reduce the side rail cross section quite a bit where the leg comes in. The leg joint somewhat refills the cut out wood. To what degree does it restore the weakened rail? I don’t have any experience in such joints.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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harum

364 posts in 2063 days


#7 posted 10-31-2018 02:43 AM

Not sure about the size of the joint, but in this video Sam used the “rocker” joint in an upholstered chair.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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harum

364 posts in 2063 days


#8 posted 10-31-2018 04:16 AM

Also, more here.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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harum

364 posts in 2063 days


#9 posted 10-31-2018 05:16 PM

I guess these two very rare upside down photos from an online gallery reveal the details of that “round dado” joint.

Bolts and wooden “washers” are used on footstools (top) and chairs (bottom). Looks like that the chair on the second photo is also reinforced with at least one big metal brace (original or not?) screwed to the side rails.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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