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Forum topic by DDJ posted 10-28-2018 01:10 PM 975 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DDJ

34 posts in 560 days


10-28-2018 01:10 PM

Yesterday the city maintenance guy called and said that there was some Black Walnut out at the city compost pile so I grabbed my chainsaw and went out there. I loaded up my Jeep with this wood and brought it home and sealed up the ends. Going back for another load today. I live in Minnesota and all of this wood was very fresh-no checks or cracks whatsoever. If I leave this wood outside will just the freezing action cause this wood to split? It could easily be subject to 20-30 degrees below zero. I’m almost 70 and the thought of carrying a whole chunked up black walnut tree down to the basement is kind of daunting. Thanks

Dave


12 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5453 posts in 2771 days


#1 posted 10-28-2018 01:21 PM

Can you cut it in half?

-- Bondo Gaposis

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JohnMcClure

634 posts in 1060 days


#2 posted 10-28-2018 01:34 PM

Boy I wish I had your problem.
Run out and buy or make a chainsaw milling jig and use your saw to slab up the walnut, say 2” thick slabs. You’ll be able to carry them to the basement (and get them up on your bandsaw later) more easily and have enough thickness left to do whatever you need once they are more dry

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2728 posts in 1642 days


#3 posted 10-28-2018 01:58 PM

I wish I was in your situation! Just paid about $8 bf for some so-so walnut.

I second what John says, slab it if you can, otherwise you’ll likely lose a lot of it to cracking even after sealing.
If you are a turner, you can pre-shape a number of bowls while it is still wet and then let them dry before finishing the shaping.

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TheDane

5654 posts in 4082 days


#4 posted 10-28-2018 03:05 PM

Freezing will not dry the wood … the liquid will turn to ice and return to a liquid state when it thaws. Seal the end-grain and get it into a temperature controlled environment with some air circulation (e.g. your basement). If you can split it or cut into slabs as suggested above, so much the better.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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DDJ

34 posts in 560 days


#5 posted 10-28-2018 04:57 PM

Thanks for the replies! I did build a set of saw bucks so I can cut the stuff up into more manageable pieces. This part of turning is new to me. I just graduated from a mini lathe-which I really haven’t used much for the last 10 years- to a full sized lathe. Finding wood around here doesn’t seem to be a problem for me around here. Seems to be a lot of Black Walnut and Maple around. If I hear a chainsaw I’ll go and investigate. I live in a small town pop 242 so everyone around here knows me anyhow. So the consensus. is to get into the basement I was hoping to through a tarp over the pile-its up off the ground-and get pieces as I wanted them. Thanks

Dave

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jdh122

1078 posts in 3237 days


#6 posted 10-28-2018 06:38 PM

If you’re going to turn it rather than make boards out of it there’s no need to rush with the drying or get all that wood into your house. I’d split the logs in half, coat the ends and then just leave it somewhere off the ground and covered from the direct rain. Then start turning at your leisure…

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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RDan

103 posts in 2743 days


#7 posted 10-28-2018 07:44 PM

I see people all the time down at our City compost site cutting firewood. We also have a number of trees that fall every year in the city that end up there. I just wish I was better at identifying them for projects. You can air dry in your yard, just keep them off the ground and a cover on top not the sides, you want air circulation to dry it out. If you slab, sticker it and seal the ends. The local farmers, here in WI near MN. use Black walnut for fence posts, so it has other uses. Dan

View DDJ's profile

DDJ

34 posts in 560 days


#8 posted 10-28-2018 11:36 PM



If you re going to turn it rather than make boards out of it there s no need to rush with the drying or get all that wood into your house. I d split the logs in half, coat the ends and then just leave it somewhere off the ground and covered from the direct rain. Then start turning at your leisure…

- jdh122


I see people all the time down at our City compost site cutting firewood. We also have a number of trees that fall every year in the city that end up there. I just wish I was better at identifying them for projects. You can air dry in your yard, just keep them off the ground and a cover on top not the sides, you want air circulation to dry it out. If you slab, sticker it and seal the ends. The local farmers, here in WI near MN. use Black walnut for fence posts, so it has other uses. Dan

- RDan

I’m not very good at identifying wood. But Black Walnut I know. I got the easy to get stuff yesterday but the whole tree has been pushed up into a big pile. I went out there again today and got some more but really had to work at it-everything is tangled together. There is a lot of nice stuff outhere yet but it’s going to take more work then my 69 year old carcass is willing or able to do. There is some other new wood out there too but I have no clue as to what it is. I have plenty of wood now anyhow. I started collecting wood before I bought my new lathe. I’ll probably start turning some of this walnut with in a week or 2. It will be my first experience of turning green wood. Got some pieces picked out already. The stuff is up off the ground and I’ll probably just wrap a tarp around it. Thanks
Dave

View unclebenny's profile

unclebenny

45 posts in 2296 days


#9 posted 10-29-2018 12:22 AM

Hi Dave, I’m in MN too, and I also have a pile of walnut logs in my yard for turning. Walnut (especially wet walnut) turns really nice. However, it is really dirty! Will stain your hands, clothes, anything else it touches …doesn’t bother me much but really irritates my wife. All advice above is good. Try mistreating a few pieces. (Spalted) walnut is kinda cool. Good luck with it, keep us posted.

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

244 posts in 1195 days


#10 posted 10-29-2018 12:45 AM

Wood will dry out fine outside providing its covered and stickered.
But laying on the gound covered will promote rot and fungus.
Mine is sitting in a pole shed off the gound and is exposed to -40 to + 35 with no problems, wood has been dried for centuries outside.

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runswithscissors

3052 posts in 2445 days


#11 posted 10-29-2018 03:22 AM

This is more of a question than a challenge, but I’m thinking I’ve heard that freezing can dry wet wood. The process is sublimation, where the ice turns to vapor rather than water. You guys who live in really cold climates will have more experience with this than I do. (Pacific NW, where it seldom gets much below freezing; 0 deg. is once every 10 or 15 years, and then it never lasts very long.).

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Wildwood

2672 posts in 2554 days


#12 posted 10-29-2018 04:24 PM

If scan section in chapters 4 and 13 of this reference can learn basic’s of air drying wood. Allow you adapt a plan for air drying in your area.

Wet wood won’t dry much in colder climates, freezing & thawing can actual render you stock pile to firewood. Extreme changes in temperture can cause end sealing to fail. So basement looks like the best option!

Depending upon diameter may want to split larger sizes making it easier to handle & store. I divide logs into bowl, hollow form, and spindle blanks based upon diameter as process logs. Lenght left longer than will need for any of the three bowls, hollow forms, or spindles. If cut away defect blanks will be shorter.

https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/products/publications/several_pubs.php?grouping_id=100&header_id=p

-- Bill

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