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How to fill in a rectangular opening

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Forum topic by Joel_B posted 10-27-2018 08:12 PM 801 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel_B

407 posts in 2263 days


10-27-2018 08:12 PM

I am remodeling my kitchen cabinets, putting on new doors, drawers and painting.
My wife wants me to get rid of the opening for the cutting board so it just looks smooth.
I am trying to figure out how to do it.
My best idea so far would be to cut a rectangular piece as close as possible to the opening.
The opening is somewhat rough and the ends are not straight so for sure there will be gaps that I will have use filler on. I could try get as close as possible by using bandsaw and/or files.
To attach the filler piece am thinking of using Gorilla glue and double sided tape to align with the front of the cabinet.
The filler piece would be taped to a flat board that will held against the cabinet.
Not sure if the Gorilla will bond since there will no clamping pressure. My thought is that since it foams up it will expand into the gap. Another thought is to use an epoxy wood filler that I have use on exterior wood that was termite damaged. Its pretty messy so would rather not use it. Here is picture of the opening.

Thanks!

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA


14 replies so far

View clin's profile

clin

1121 posts in 1878 days


#1 posted 10-27-2018 08:38 PM

I’d cut a piece just a bit oversized. Then trim the piece by hand as needed using a block plane or just sanding. You should be able to get a tight enough where common wood glue would work fine.

The idea of temporarily attaching to a piece to get it to register against the front makes sense. Though I’d just screw or tack it to that though tape would work. I asumue you are painting this so gaps or any holes are easily filled.

Another way is to taper the sides of the fill piece so it wedges in the hole. It will then be proud of the surface. At that point get out a hand plane and bring it down flush to the surface.

Regardless, I would think you could have narrow enough gaps that any sort of filler, even spackling compound, would work fine. Once sanded and painted, it should be invisible.

-- Clin

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1781 days


#2 posted 10-28-2018 03:54 AM

Take the wood rails that hold the cutting board out.
On the back of the face frame mount a board over the rectangle hole.
Cut a block to fit in the rectangle hole, as close as you can, then glue and screw it to the block you put on.
(screw it in from behind)
Then Bondo the face.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1357 posts in 3965 days


#3 posted 10-28-2018 10:39 AM



Take the wood rails that hold the cutting board out.
On the back of the face frame mount a board over the rectangle hole.
Cut a block to fit in the rectangle hole, as close as you can, then glue and screw it to the block you put on.
(screw it in from behind)
Then Bondo the face.

- jbay

LJ fail….
You’ve completely ignored the necessity to complicate the hell out of a simple task with your answer :(

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1551 posts in 2917 days


#4 posted 10-28-2018 12:31 PM



LJ fail….
You ve completely ignored the necessity to complicate the hell out of a simple task with your answer :(

- Tony_S

LOL! You guys kill me….

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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bondogaposis

5872 posts in 3233 days


#5 posted 10-28-2018 12:54 PM

Cut a piece oversize and taper it into a wedge, put some glue on it and tap it into place then plane it flush with the front of the cabinet.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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splintergroup

4047 posts in 2104 days


#6 posted 10-28-2018 02:01 PM

I’d re-negotiate the terms of the end-design and opt for a decorative overlay of some contrasting material/finish. It’ll take about 1/10th the time and no ever-reappearing cracks to deal with.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8946 posts in 3459 days


#7 posted 10-28-2018 02:27 PM

If it’s paint grade nail the cutting board flush and Bondo the gaps sand prime and paint.

Might have to cut some wedges to fill in the bigger gaps.

Done

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5942 posts in 4125 days


#8 posted 10-28-2018 03:07 PM

I second the tapered plug answer.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

12258 posts in 4310 days


#9 posted 10-28-2018 03:30 PM

Third the tapered plug, with an added suggestion. Start with a slightly thicker piece than you need and plane a taper to that, also.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7667 posts in 4250 days


#10 posted 10-28-2018 05:42 PM

I believe that there is a majority opinion on the tapered plug, nuff said!

-- "It's fine in practise but it will never work in theory"

View Joel_B's profile

Joel_B

407 posts in 2263 days


#11 posted 10-29-2018 01:58 AM

Ok going with the tapered plug.
Would have never thought of that.

Thanks All!

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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runswithscissors

3118 posts in 2907 days


#12 posted 10-29-2018 03:16 AM

I’m with splinter group on this one. A decorative piece, maybe with a bit of edge molding, to cover, not fill the hole.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Robert's profile

Robert

4048 posts in 2363 days


#13 posted 10-29-2018 02:03 PM

Construction adhesive and Bondo…..

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View pottz's profile

pottz

11708 posts in 1866 days


#14 posted 10-29-2018 11:09 PM



Take the wood rails that hold the cutting board out.
On the back of the face frame mount a board over the rectangle hole.
Cut a block to fit in the rectangle hole, as close as you can, then glue and screw it to the block you put on.
(screw it in from behind)
Then Bondo the face.

- jbay


+1

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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