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Forum topic by MrRon posted 10-26-2018 04:20 PM 1175 views 0 times favorited 39 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

5784 posts in 3808 days


10-26-2018 04:20 PM

Us old timers (I’m one of them) usually complain about the lack of talent among our youth and how traditional values have been lost; that all they want to do is play video games and talk on their cell phones. After being on this web site for many years, I can definitely say talent is not dead, but alive and well. I see projects on this site and others that confirms my observation. When I refer to “youth” I also include those still in their working years. These “artisans” provide inspiration to all who aspire to woodworking or any other craft. The human race still makes advances for the better. Keep up the good work.


39 replies so far

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diverlloyd

3714 posts in 2422 days


#1 posted 10-26-2018 05:14 PM

Well said MrRon

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ralbuck

6248 posts in 2831 days


#2 posted 10-26-2018 05:26 PM

I would love to be 21 again and KNOW WHAT I know now. I would take many paths different form those I traveled.

I want to live at least a couple of more decades to see what is developing in the industrial, scientific, medical, energy, and travel aspects of our “civilization”. The “political BS” being spread everywhere now makes the use of the term “civilized” very in-accurate! I just wonder which side is lying the worst; I know both sides are lying on every issue!

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

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mudflap4869

2001 posts in 2023 days


#3 posted 10-26-2018 05:45 PM

I learned several years ago that the majority of our young men and women are very responsible. They just lack proper leaders to set good examples for them. We the older generation failed to give them the loving attention that they deserved.

-- Still trying to master kindling making

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Phil32

726 posts in 468 days


#4 posted 10-26-2018 07:23 PM

Most all of the talent demonstrated on this site was obtained by effort & practice over significant time. We now live with a generation only interested in instant gratification.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit! Likewise with woodworkers.

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JADobson

1448 posts in 2675 days


#5 posted 10-26-2018 07:57 PM



We now live with a generation only interested in instant gratification.

- Phil32

Said every old man of every generation. Damn kids.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 1054 days


#6 posted 10-26-2018 07:59 PM



Most all of the talent demonstrated on this site was obtained by effort & practice over significant time. We now live with a generation only interested in instant gratification.

- Phil32

I think that is a bit unfair. I recently took a class a weekend class on turning, and most of the people enrolled were under 30. I also think most people here grew up ‘hooked’ on tv, or radio, or whatever it was that made the younger generation less worthy and softer than their elders.

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JADobson

1448 posts in 2675 days


#7 posted 10-26-2018 08:01 PM

Our sires’ age was worse than our grandsires’. We, their sons, are more
worthless than they; so in our turn we shall give the world a progeny yet more
corrupt.
—Horace “Odes” ~20 BC

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 1054 days


#8 posted 10-26-2018 08:03 PM



Our sires age was worse than our grandsires . We, their sons, are more
worthless than they; so in our turn we shall give the world a progeny yet more
corrupt.
—Horace “Odes” ~20 BC

- JADobson

I think the line after that was ‘And get off my lawn.’

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Redoak49

4283 posts in 2553 days


#9 posted 10-26-2018 10:34 PM

It is very clear that the current younger generation is quite different as the digital devices are taking over. There are fewer shop type classes being offered as interest has dropped.

At the same time, The job openings in the mfg and construction trades has gone up.

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runswithscissors

3081 posts in 2589 days


#10 posted 10-27-2018 03:50 AM

I don’t think lack of interest is why shop classes aren’t offered. Due to the (over) emphasis on testing, budget doesn’t allow non-academic offerings. Not just shop, but music and art and foreign languages have gone away, largely. And it’s not just financial, it’s time budget as well that no longer makes room for those kinds of classes.

I have always felt it is foolish to demean and second-rate manual skills.. And I was an English teacher for 27 years. One of the skills that a well-taught shop class could teach was task analysis—what is the best approach to a task, and how should it be broken down. I see inquiries often in LJ that demonstrate a need for this.

People used to ask if I’d seen a change for the worse in kids. My answer always was, “They have always wanted two things: to be liked, and to succeed.” Trouble often follows when those needs aren’t met, for whatever reason.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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JADobson

1448 posts in 2675 days


#11 posted 10-27-2018 05:02 AM



There are fewer shop type classes being offered as interest has dropped.

- Redoak49

If schools stopped offering classes because of student interest would there be any classes left? Much more likely is that the parents and administrators (ie boomers) didn’t have much interest and allowed shop classes to disappear. You can’t pin this one on the kids.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

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Woodbum

898 posts in 3630 days


#12 posted 10-27-2018 10:06 AM

You are correct Mr Ron. Since the beginning of recorded history, older generations have bemoaned the worthless, lazy upstarts coming up, that will amount to nothing as they grow older. My parents’ generation did. We were just a bunch of dumb-*ss longhairs that only cared about sex, drugs, rock and roll and beer. I still care deeply about two of these, and have some fond (and not so fond) memories of the others. We turned out all right and this younger generation will too. They are just a little different than we are and maybe some of that different is better. Hopefully, they will “tough it out, suck it up and be the best they can”. Credits to John Mellencamp.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

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Redoak49

4283 posts in 2553 days


#13 posted 10-27-2018 10:46 AM

I do not bemoan them as being worthless but just that they are very different. Kids today are much less interested in doing things like working on a car or anything mechanical. They are most interested in the little screens they carry.

The amount of time spent on social media is astounding. It has been estimated that teens spend up to 8-9 hours per day on social media. (Washington Post).

Yes, this generation is very different and in my opinion the time on their screens is appalling.

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Planeman40

1467 posts in 3325 days


#14 posted 10-27-2018 03:54 PM

I once read an article in National Geographic years back about a 3,000 year old small cuneiform clay tablet found an an archeological dig. It was obviously a letter sent to a wayward son by this father telling him to straighten up and stop wasting his life on wine and loose women. It stated he had bought him the best of tutors and had given him every advantage, yet all he wanted to do is fool around. I got a large laugh reading that and it made me understand mankind hasn’t changed much over the ages.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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jamsomito

442 posts in 990 days


#15 posted 10-27-2018 05:46 PM

As much as I hate to admit it, I am a millennial. I very much dislike and disagree with the generalizations of my generation. I hope anyone slinging the usual terms around realizes that their own generation has equal or worse issues of a different type.

I’ve been told since early childhood by society that you need to go to college, get a “good” white collar job to be successful in life. The trades will eat you up, destroy your body, and you’ll be forever scraping by with the income you get. My dad was a carpenter by trade, sole proprietor, whose knees and back are shot from years of hard manual labor. He, by the way, graduated from college with a math and physics major, then pursued his dreams of becoming an oil painting portrait artist and learned the hard way you can’t support yourself, much less a family, doing that. My mom worked a desk job high up at a corporation downtown and we lived on the support of her income essentially. Who was I to argue? They just wanted better for their kids. Can you blame our generation for doing exactly that? I think not – it is the previous generations disincentives that killed the trades. Regardless of career path, however, my parents teachings of work ethic still carried through.

I have a large interest in the arts, which I have no doubt stems from my dad’s dreams. I play trumpet and guitar, dabble in photography, brew my own beer, and of course, try to hone my craft in my small garage woodshop. I do it on the side for fun because at this point I’m too invested in my career to make a switch, but I fully understand the rewarding nature of the work. I married a 5-12 grade band director who is passionate about her work. We know first hand the pressure to cut the arts. It’s unacceptable. And it is certainly not coming from our generation at large. The fields lack impassioned leaders to bring up their replacements.

I feel as though the trades are becoming a safer, more lucrative option for the next generation – it has to to balance out. And something has to be done about skyrocketing higher-education costs or there will be a strong disincentive to pursue that path. There kind of already is. There is a strong likelihood my kids will end up in the arts or a skilled trade. But it will be their choice. And I don’t think I’m the only modern parent with this mentality.

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