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Forum topic by Sam_NY posted 10-25-2018 04:38 PM 582 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sam_NY

9 posts in 2381 days


10-25-2018 04:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw blades

Hey,

I just got handed down my first table saw (a 50s Craftsman 113). It’s got the original 3/4 HP motor on it. I need to pick up some blades and wonder if anyone has any recs for a couple blades to pick up for not too much $. I guess I’m looking for recs on type/specs, but also brand if you have very specific recs. Like if you were buying your novice woodworker friend a couple of blades, what would you get him/her? I cut up average lumber and ply mostly. Thanks.

-- Sam in NY


18 replies so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

6056 posts in 2686 days


#1 posted 10-25-2018 04:49 PM

The blade choice depends on how the saw is going to be primarily used. Cabinet work requires much higher quality blades, than general use does.

I would buy a thin of kerf -carbide tipped one and see how it worked for me before buying a bunch. I use diamond files and sharpen my carbide blades that way. Clamped in a vise with wood supports to keeo from damaging the teeth too. So one blade might last you a long time.

Hope this helps some at least.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

623 posts in 331 days


#2 posted 10-25-2018 05:08 PM

What blade size do you have, 10”? Do you have a zero clearance throat plate, for when cutting narrow slices or pieces.. If not you could make one yourself. Also make yourself a table saw sled or two, this would benefit you greatly. I use my sleds 50% of the time for my cuts. On a 10” blade most people would prefer 30 to 40 tooth blade. I use a 80 tooth blade with the Zero clearance throat plate, if I’m not using a sled. I get less tear out with the method.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5951 posts in 3233 days


#3 posted 10-25-2018 05:17 PM

Thin kerf Diablo blades by Freud are tough to beat for a value blade. You can find them at Home Depot and local hardware stores. Pick one with a 30-40 tooth count for general ripping and crosscutting tasks.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Sam_NY

9 posts in 2381 days


#4 posted 10-25-2018 05:20 PM

Thanks, rallbuck. I’m just a hobbyist really—anticipate using it for making furniture for the home/friends, etc., but not commercial.


What blade size do you have, 10”? Do you have a zero clearance throat plate, for when cutting narrow slices or pieces.. If not you could make one yourself. Also make yourself a table saw sled or two, this would benefit you greatly. I use my sleds 50% of the time for my cuts. On a 10” blade most people would prefer 30 to 40 tooth blade. I use a 80 tooth blade with the Zero clearance throat plate, if I m not using a sled. I get less tear out with the method.

Thanks, WoodenDreams. It’s 10”. You’re talking about crosscut blades, right? I only have original accessories, so down the road, I may look to invest in better miter gauge and fence. Getting a zero clearance insert is next though. Then making a sled, as you suggest.

-- Sam in NY

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

917 posts in 2004 days


#5 posted 10-25-2018 05:23 PM

For your stated purpose, I suggest you shop Home Depot and get these two blades:
Diabo, 10”x 60 tooth, D1060X Fine Finish blade, for 40 dollars
Diable, 10” x 40 tooth, D1040X, General Purpose blade, for 30 dollars

I use these blades often, and find great results. I have an assortment of pricey blades, collected over the years, for a 3hp cabinet saw. It is the $40 Diablo 60T that I leave on the saw as my general purpose blade.

You can spend twice this combined purchase on one higher priced blade, but you said you were looking to get started, and I do not think you need to spend at that level on a first blade.

If you elect to spend a little more, get a 24T blade and try it out for ripping. Then next, go for an 80T to get an even finer cut. Still though, I would say you can go with moderately priced blades from your big box home improvement store.

.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

554 posts in 1039 days


#6 posted 10-25-2018 05:38 PM

Thin kerf Freud blades are tough to beat for the price.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Sam_NY's profile

Sam_NY

9 posts in 2381 days


#7 posted 10-25-2018 05:42 PM

Thanks very much pintodeluxe and jimintx. That seems about right. Very helpful to have the tooth counts. And since even cheaper ones are pretty expensive, I didn’t want to buy one only to immediately wish I’d gotten something else.

-- Sam in NY

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1291 posts in 1329 days


#8 posted 10-25-2018 06:23 PM

Read this post by resident LJ’er knotscott. Should give you lots of information.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View SMP's profile

SMP

1183 posts in 325 days


#9 posted 10-25-2018 06:29 PM



For your stated purpose, I suggest you shop Home Depot and get these two blades:
Diabo, 10”x 60 tooth, D1060X Fine Finish blade, for 40 dollars
Diable, 10” x 40 tooth, D1040X, General Purpose blade, for 30 dollars

I use these blades often, and find great results. I have an assortment of pricey blades, collected over the years, for a 3hp cabinet saw. It is the $40 Diablo 60T that I leave on the saw as my general purpose blade.

You can spend twice this combined purchase on one higher priced blade, but you said you were looking to get started, and I do not think you need to spend at that level on a first blade.

If you elect to spend a little more, get a 24T blade and try it out for ripping. Then next, go for an 80T to get an even finer cut. Still though, I would say you can go with moderately priced blades from your big box home improvement store.

.

- jimintx

I was also going to recommend the $30 Diablo blades from HD. That’s what sits on my table saw and compound miter saw. I usually clean up the cuts on a jointer anyways, but even a hand plane and a $30 blade is more than enough for a hobbyist IMO.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12843 posts in 2800 days


#10 posted 10-26-2018 05:42 AM

I really hate the term “starter” because it’s marketing speak for something that is perceived as low quality and implies you need to upgrade. All woodworkers need the same qualities from a blade. That said, if you want inexpensive then I recommend the Dewalt 10” blades sold in big box stores.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7487 posts in 3788 days


#11 posted 10-26-2018 07:47 PM

I only use Forrest blades.
My “starter” set was a three blade combo that came with my Craftsman 10” table saw, a rip, a cross cut and a think kerf plywood blade but once I used a Forrest WWII blade I tossed all but the plywood blade.
The Forrest WWII is very good for rip and cross cutting so I saw no reason to keep those two Craftsman blades.

I have two of the Forrest blades so that I am never without one when one of them needs sharpening.
My older Forrest blade is close to 40 years old and has been sharpened three times, once due to a chipped tooth.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3719 days


#12 posted 10-26-2018 08:10 PM

For a relatively underpowered saw like you describe, you’re going to want a thin kerf blade. The Freud combination blades are quite nice, and they won’t break the bank.

View Sam_NY's profile

Sam_NY

9 posts in 2381 days


#13 posted 10-26-2018 08:15 PM

I get it, Woodknack. I guess I meant it more like: what blades should I get “to start,” since I don’t have any and can’t afford a whole bunch right off? I’m always interested in inexpensive, too, but that’s not the only criteria, or I’d skip the post and just go to Harbor Freight.

But you’re right… I wish I could go back and skip over buying some of the lower quality “starter” tools I used to have and apply that $ to better ones. On the other hand, I think using the cheap ones helped me know what to look for in round two. I dunno. I’m happy to have this saw though – it was my grandfather’s and then my dad’s – and I’ll do my best to make it as serviceable as possible, including buying the right blades, etc. Lots of great tips on this site for these.

Thanks for the DeWalt rec.

And thanks, Old Novice, for the Forrest rec. Will look into those too.

-- Sam in NY

View Lazyman's profile (online now)

Lazyman

3551 posts in 1807 days


#14 posted 10-26-2018 09:28 PM

I personally like the Marples 10” 50 tooth combo. I’ve been amazed how smooth the finish is on both cross cuts and rips. It is practically ready for a finish right off the saw.

BTW, maybe this goes without saying since you have been a LJ member for years but before you use the saw make sure you understand how to safely use it (all the dos and don’ts) and make sure that fence is parallel to the blade to prevent kickbacks.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View mel52's profile

mel52

865 posts in 685 days


#15 posted 10-27-2018 06:59 AM

Diablo has a good combo thin kerf 50 tooth blade that I use quite a bit. Does pretty good for both cross cut and ripping.

-- MEL, Kansas

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