LumberJocks

casters, adjustable feet and keeping your workbench flat after moving around

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Spikes posted 10-24-2018 02:12 PM 1291 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Spikes's profile

Spikes

125 posts in 466 days


10-24-2018 02:12 PM

Dear all,

I’m finalizing the design of my workbenches, a heavy and narrower 2×4 laminated one and a lighter 4’x8’, and realizing that another problem I’ll have to deal with is a very uneven floor. I’ve seen people tackling this with adjustable feet, however I also wanted to put casters on the benches and I’ve not seen any design accounting for both. Any idea what’s the best practice for that? Should I just forgo the casters on the heavy one and just have them on the larger/lighter one + opposite thing for adjustable feet?

thanks,

Spike

-- Don't worry about making progress, worry about practicing. If you practice you will make progress even if you don't want to.


7 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

554 posts in 1040 days


#1 posted 10-24-2018 03:29 PM

I have wheels on one end of my assembly tables and levelers on all four legs. Turns the table into a wheelbarrow for moving. I found a picture or video on the internet with a very simple design for flip up wheels. It was about 9 years ago, so I have no idea where I found it. But this is a you tube of what I have: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JF7EgoYJAqc

The design allows the wheels to flip up when not in use and lock down to move the table. 2×4 framing and some hinges . The design does require that you be able to lift the wheeled end a little to allow the wheels to drop and lock and you need to lift the other end to move it.

You could do both ends if you need more agility.

-- Sawdust Maker

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2379 days


#2 posted 10-24-2018 04:01 PM

Good question Spikes. I am wondering the same. I was thinking of building with heavy duty wheels on one side and the heaviest rubberized adjustable feet I can find on the other. I am as strong as a baby ox, so I should be able to wheel it around as needed.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View mathguy1981's profile

mathguy1981

94 posts in 325 days


#3 posted 10-24-2018 04:05 PM

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

623 posts in 331 days


#4 posted 10-24-2018 06:26 PM

The type of caster that mathguy1981 is suggesting is they way I would have suggested. Ebay has retractable workbench casters workbench. Depending on your weight, 4 for $55 or $55 each

View Spikes's profile

Spikes

125 posts in 466 days


#5 posted 10-24-2018 08:35 PM

thanks all, glad to know people are mixing both, I wasn’t sure how to do it otherwise.

@Mathguy1981 & @WoodenDreams , yeah I’ve seen the video and those wheels… nice stuff, don’t have the budget for it. I actually had seen something like @LittleShaver linked and will probably try that first.

And in case it helps somebody in the future, I actually had posted previously about caster system and done quite a bit of research. This was my list/post which included that video/design:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/274273

-- Don't worry about making progress, worry about practicing. If you practice you will make progress even if you don't want to.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 910 days


#6 posted 10-24-2018 09:20 PM

Here’s another version of the shopmade.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpUSLKSehjs

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3554 posts in 1808 days


#7 posted 10-25-2018 02:30 PM

If your bench isn’t too heavy from being loaded down with tools and projects to lift one end, at around 3:20 minutes in this Norm Abrams video, you can see a simple approach that won’t interfere with levelers put into the bottom of the legs I used this approach on my assembly/outfeed table where I used Norm’s leg design for the table. It is very simple to implement as long as the bench isn’t too heavy to lift each end manually.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com