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Contact Cement and MDF

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Forum topic by dakremer posted 10-09-2018 12:44 AM 620 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dakremer

2742 posts in 3510 days


10-09-2018 12:44 AM

I’m building some MDF cabinet doors. My plan is to glue 1/4 MDF (rails and stiles) onto 1/2 MDF base. I don’t have a vacuum bag clamping system, which would obviously be the best option. I’m thinking about just using some Contact Cement, to make the glue-up super easy – What are your thoughts on this? Any reason not to do this? Think it’ll be strong enough or hold up over time? These doors will be painted.

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!


14 replies so far

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dakremer

2742 posts in 3510 days


#1 posted 10-09-2018 12:52 AM

Besides the glue-up, I’m also a little concerned about installing hinges in the MDF…

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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Rich

4555 posts in 1008 days


#2 posted 10-09-2018 01:17 AM

Just plain old Titebond will work fine. Get a brayer or use a brush so you can spread it evenly and use another piece of 1/2” MDF as a caul on the top to make sure it clamps evenly. Be sure to glue it up a little oversized and then trim it when it’s glued to be the final dimension and square.

Hinges will be fine as long as you’re screwing into the face of the MDF. Going into the core through the side is weaker.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 909 days


#3 posted 10-09-2018 01:22 AM

Depends on what you mean by ‘easy’. Contact cement is a great way to glue mdf panels, as long as you know how to do it correctly. I’ve had my ‘fun’ with contact cement in the past, so just make sure you plan ahead because once it touches, it’s all over.

My suggestion would to make the frames a little over sized, and then use a router to clean up the inside and outside.

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dakremer

2742 posts in 3510 days


#4 posted 10-09-2018 01:28 AM

Ok – I just made a door. It went really well! seems like it’ll work just fine. Now just need to make about 10 more…..

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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tyvekboy

1911 posts in 3432 days


#5 posted 10-09-2018 01:49 AM

Just a tip I learned when working with contact cement. After you get the contact cement spread on both surfaces, use a piece of TYVEK as a slip-sheet. Just place it on one of the glued surfaces.

This will allow you to position it where you want before you pull out the slip-sheet. Based on what you are doing, I would use strips of TYVEK. Then you can pull the slip-sheet of each side of the square frame out after positioning it.

Hope this helps.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 909 days


#6 posted 10-09-2018 01:55 AM



Just a tip I learned when working with contact cement. After you get the contact cement spread on both surfaces, use a piece of TYVEK as a slip-sheet. Just place it on one of the glued surfaces.

This will allow you to position it where you want before you pull out the slip-sheet. Based on what you are doing, I would use strips of TYVEK. Then you can pull the slip-sheet of each side of the square frame out after positioning it.

Hope this helps.

- tyvekboy

Where were you when I needed this advice? ;)

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dakremer

2742 posts in 3510 days


#7 posted 10-09-2018 02:08 AM

What I did was line up one side with a flat edge. Once it was all bonded, I trimmed the other ends, and then came back and trimmed that lined up edge. Everything came out nice and square – pretty easy build actually! Just hope it holds up over time!

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 909 days


#8 posted 10-09-2018 02:24 AM

It will hold, trust me, I have some cladding I did for my parents 15 years ago that’s still holding up well. Glad it went better than my first attempt with it. I didn’t plan very well and I ended up redoing a lot of work.

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GR8HUNTER

6210 posts in 1131 days


#9 posted 10-09-2018 02:25 AM

why not just use popular with MDF panel ? just curious as to what benefits you think you night have with all MDF :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Jim Jakosh

22878 posts in 3524 days


#10 posted 10-09-2018 02:27 AM

I’d use Titebond III and put weights on the outer frame until the glue sets up. I’d be concerned with hinges in MDF especially if the doors are to be used quite a bit, But if you must, after aligning the hinges and screwing them in place, I’d take all the hinges off and put Titebond II in the screw holes with a tooth pick and let it make a harder seat for the screws to give them a chance of holding better.

Using contact cement, you have to make perfect alignment when the two meet because there is no chance for movement once they touch. If you have a way to do that, it will work good too. I always like to roll the piece with a weighted roller when using contact cement to insure full contact everywhere on the part.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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cracknpop

350 posts in 2768 days


#11 posted 10-09-2018 02:28 AM

My concern with contact cement and MDF is how it will hold up over time. I used contact cement between Formica sheet and MDF for extensions to my table saw. Glued Formica to both sides. A year or two later, Formica sections began to fall off. The glue didn’t fail, the top surface fibers of MDF released.

Of course, your application being painted doors inside a home where the humidity levels are fairly stable may make a huge difference over my table saw extensions in my woodshop and humidity swings during Summers in Indiana.

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

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dakremer

2742 posts in 3510 days


#12 posted 10-09-2018 02:49 AM


why not just use popular with MDF panel ? just curious as to what benefits you think you night have with all MDF :<))

- GR8HUNTER

I’m in a time crunch. Trying to get these done before little baby kremer comes in a month. Also, baby Kremer will probably destroy these within a few years, so I don’t want to put a ton of money in them – I can always remake them. As far as other benefits – the MDF is more stable and won’t warp – its dead flat. It’s also super easy to paint. Also they way I made them, the stiles and rails will never “crack” because they are one solid piece.

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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mtnwalton

51 posts in 1445 days


#13 posted 10-09-2018 03:09 AM

About 15 years ago I built a two door cabinet (rolling with 8” casters) with 10 drawers behind the doors. At the time I had more MDF than funds so the bulk of the cabinet was in MDF. Drawers were plywood. The hinges held up well under tough abuse from many volunteers. Unit was transported in and out of shops and backstage areas for stage productions fairly frequently.

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Richard

11274 posts in 3452 days


#14 posted 10-13-2018 09:22 PM

- GR8HUNTER

I m in a time crunch. Trying to get these done before little baby kremer comes in a month. Also, baby Kremer will probably destroy these within a few years, so I don t want to put a ton of money in them – I can always remake them. As far as other benefits – the MDF is more stable and won t warp – its dead flat. It s also super easy to paint. Also they way I made them, the stiles and rails will never “crack” because they are one solid piece.

- dakremer

That’s the way to go!

Rick S.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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