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Trying to achieve a certain look with these pine doors

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Forum topic by kk78x posted 10-03-2018 03:11 PM 494 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kk78x

4 posts in 264 days


10-03-2018 03:11 PM

Hi guys, new to the forum but could really use some guidance on pine doors we are putting in our new home if anyone has a moment to reply. Our old house had these which we really liked (sorry, can’t seem to get it to rotate vertically):

I bought some pine slabs like thiis to try and replicate the look in our new house but haven’t done anything with them yet:

Any thoughts on what they might have done to these doors? I think they are on the honey/amber side of the spectrum and glossy.

I’ve been looking on youtube and thought I should go with gel stain like Golden Pine from General Finishes as a beginner but then I did find this post on the LJ forum and they look awfully close, if not a little less orange…so now I’m not sure…maybe neither one and there’s a better method?

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/107530

Thanks in advance.


10 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

540 posts in 1013 days


#1 posted 10-03-2018 05:15 PM

My guess is that the original doors were shellac coated with an orange shellac.

-- Sawdust Maker

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1427 posts in 2030 days


#2 posted 10-03-2018 06:11 PM



My guess is that the original doors were shellac coated with an orange shellac.

- LittleShaver

x2

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

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kk78x

4 posts in 264 days


#3 posted 10-04-2018 12:22 AM

Great, thanks guys. Looks like I’ve got some research to do on shellac. I might look for something a little less orange but this gives me a solid starting off point. I appreciate it.

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kk78x

4 posts in 264 days


#4 posted 10-04-2018 12:45 AM

Hmm, I’m reading shellac on a bathroom door turns white. We never had any problems with getting moisture on our old doors and color changing. Maybe some top coat over the shellac?

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OSU55

2314 posts in 2383 days


#5 posted 10-04-2018 12:48 AM

There are a lot of ways to achieve the color match. I would suggest deciding on the type of topcoat finish you want, based on the application method you will use, then “work backwards” to develop the full finish schedule. There are so many ways to do things, you can eliminate many based on whether you can spray or not, and the durability and gloss desired of the final finish. If you have kids I dont recommend shellac as a topcoat, and shellac may not be needed at all.

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Rich

4491 posts in 983 days


#6 posted 10-04-2018 01:51 AM

Assuming the trim around the door in your first photo is a shade of white, there is a major color cast in the photo. Correcting the white balance results in the image below. If I’m wrong about the color of the trim, ignore it.

One thing I do see in the photo is that someone trimmed at least two inches off of the lock stile when they hung it.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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kk78x

4 posts in 264 days


#7 posted 10-04-2018 02:47 AM

Ha, good eye. Lived in that house 10+ yrs and never noticed that. Seems they took a 30” door down to 28” for the bathroom. That color is very close too, thx for the color correction. I found a close-up with the color corrected:

Think I’ll stay away from shellac based on what OSU55 said. I’ve done very little staining before but could probably get a sprayer if needed. Dunno if that’s a good move for a beginner though, I’ll keep researching on this forum.

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Rich

4491 posts in 983 days


#8 posted 10-04-2018 04:25 AM


Think I ll stay away from shellac based on what OSU55 said. I ve done very little staining before but could probably get a sprayer if needed. Dunno if that s a good move for a beginner though, I ll keep researching on this forum.

- kk78x

Yeah, I’d stay away from shellac too. If you have the facilities to spray, a pre-cat lacquer would be good. If not, go with a wipe on varnish. You can mix your own, but Minwax wipe on poly is a great product that’s very easy to use.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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OSU55

2314 posts in 2383 days


#9 posted 10-04-2018 02:50 PM

Yeah precat is great if you can spray. For wipe on, reg mw poly thinned 1:1. If you color with stain or dye you need blotch control for pine, read this. For wipe on wd lockwood oil based dye can be added to poly to color the wood, for lower intensity color which appears to be what you want. Precat can be tinted with Transtint dye. Many options.

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bondogaposis

5414 posts in 2745 days


#10 posted 10-04-2018 03:40 PM

Amber shellac, makes new pine look like old pine.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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