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Rusty Band Saw and blade

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Forum topic by Paul Fisicaro posted 10-02-2018 12:59 PM 717 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Paul Fisicaro

29 posts in 1952 days


10-02-2018 12:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: band saw safe blades bandsaw blade

I live in the Florida Keys and last year in September, we were hit with Hurricane Irma. I lost most of my tools but toted the Delta 28-475X up the stairs and into my living room. It was spared, unlike most of my hand tools and power tools. My house has been under construction for 10 months and repairs are final. Wood shop is going up as I speak and Ill be ready for some woodworking soon.

The problem is that my band saw has been sitting under my house unprotected from salt, besides spraying it with silicone every month or so, most of the parts have rusted, mostly the bolts, the table. This brings me to question #1,
Is rust “ok”? THe bolts and minor things I think should be fine. Ill try to clean those up with a wire brush and wd40. My concern is with something like this..

And I’m not sure if I ever try to clean around those pulleys with lubricant. I’m not sure if its a good idea to get lube in those areas? I’m a complete novice when it comes to band saws. I used it like 10 times since I bought it used a few years ago and but I plan to use it a lot more this year.

Question #2. My bad saw blade has rusted. I think if I cut one piece of hardwood it might shed that surface rust or it could smack me in the face after it breaks, Haha. The blade could be compromised. Its probably a stupid question since a blade (timber wolf) only cost like $30 bucks but I barely used that blade. I guess you’ll tell me better to be safe than sorry.

Here are a few of the other pictures.

The table is coming clean. A little bit of sand paper and silicone.

Thanks!

Paul


12 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5210 posts in 4379 days


#1 posted 10-02-2018 02:16 PM

STOP USIN’ THE SILICONE!!!!!
Mineral spirits, WD40, sand paper, non-woven pads, or scraping will remove rust.
You’re asking for trouble when you use silicone.
Clean it up (even a wire wheel), get a new blade.
You’ll spend some time, but the saw should come back to life.

-- [email protected]

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3115 posts in 2591 days


#2 posted 10-02-2018 02:17 PM

The rust doesn’t look to bad mainly surface just clean it up as best you can and oil everything up and wipe it off. I would replace the blade the rust may have taken the edge off the teeth. The rust on the blade will transfer to any wood you are sawing. A band saw blade that size just stops if it breaks you can use it if you like but it is likely dull now.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2377 days


#3 posted 10-02-2018 02:47 PM

That blade will heat up with all the added friction, replace that for sure.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View Don W's profile

Don W

19248 posts in 2986 days


#4 posted 10-02-2018 04:14 PM

wipe it down with wd-40 or something like Fluid Film. Se how it looks. If you want to go a little more a med or fine wire wheel or rust eraser will work fine. You could als wire wheel the blade, but it’ll probably dull pretty quickly anyhow.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Paul Fisicaro's profile

Paul Fisicaro

29 posts in 1952 days


#5 posted 10-02-2018 11:00 PM



STOP USIN THE SILICONE!!!!!
Mineral spirits, WD40, sand paper, non-woven pads, or scraping will remove rust.
You re asking for trouble when you use silicone.
Clean it up (even a wire wheel), get a new blade.
You ll spend some time, but the saw should come back to life.

- Bill White

Silicone not good? A carpenter friend told me to silicone everything! I silicone my table saw, miter saw and all my other tools. Not good, huh?

Thanks for all the replies. Ill get cleaning.

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1900 posts in 2602 days


#6 posted 10-02-2018 11:27 PM

Silicone will interfere with wood finishes and is basically impossible to get rid of. For anything that will ever touch wood, don’t use silicone.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

528 posts in 598 days


#7 posted 10-03-2018 03:08 AM

Test that blade before chucking it. You probably have to sand whatever comes out of it anyway so give it a whirl.

View Paul Fisicaro's profile

Paul Fisicaro

29 posts in 1952 days


#8 posted 10-03-2018 03:10 AM

I have some Ipe that will clean that blade right up.. lol.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

609 posts in 1888 days


#9 posted 10-03-2018 05:40 AM

“WD-40 Specialist” spray is what you want for long-term rust protection. It will last for a a year or so outside in the weather protecting a metal surface.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Paul Fisicaro's profile

Paul Fisicaro

29 posts in 1952 days


#10 posted 10-03-2018 01:38 PM



“WD-40 Specialist” spray is what you want for long-term rust protection. It will last for a a year or so outside in the weather protecting a metal surface.

- William Shelley

Ill get some. Thanks for the info!

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#11 posted 10-03-2018 04:09 PM

Paul, I lived in Key West for six years way back when I was in the Navy
and we used CRC 3-36, CRC-SP350, CRC-SP400, and CRC Marine on everything.
they are rust and corrosion preventive coatings. highly recommended on your boat motors
and any metal products that are even remotely exposed to the salt air.
stop by your local marina store and see what they have on the shelf that suits your needs.
(and ask them the difference between CRC and WD40 for the Keys environment).

[I won’t venture into the WD-40 war zone]. CRC is just what we used because it works
for the salty environment that the Keys has to offer. (and stop using silicone).
it may be to your advantage to do a little research into the CRC Lubricant and Corrosion Inhibitors.
(and yes I know the difference between rust and corrosion).
the Navy and USCG goes through cases and cases of CRC products on their boats and aircraft in the Keys.
jus my Dos Centavos

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Paul Fisicaro's profile

Paul Fisicaro

29 posts in 1952 days


#12 posted 10-03-2018 04:52 PM



Paul, I lived in Key West for six years way back when I was in the Navy
and we used CRC 3-36, CRC-SP350, CRC-SP400, and CRC Marine on everything.
they are rust and corrosion preventive coatings. highly recommended on your boat motors
and any metal products that are even remotely exposed to the salt air.
stop by your local marina store and see what they have on the shelf that suits your needs.
(and ask them the difference between CRC and WD40 for the Keys environment).

[I won t venture into the WD-40 war zone]. CRC is just what we used because it works
for the salty environment that the Keys has to offer. (and stop using silicone).
it may be to your advantage to do a little research into the CRC Lubricant and Corrosion Inhibitors.
(and yes I know the difference between rust and corrosion).
the Navy and USCG goes through cases and cases of CRC products on their boats and aircraft in the Keys.
jus my Dos Centavos

.

.

- John Smith

I use CRC on my 90 hp Yamadog on my skiff. I didn’t even think to use that. All my damn carpenter buddies told me to use silicone. The good thing is that my wood shop was just closed in and it will have AC now. Everything will be out of the elements and de-humidified. I just need to clean this puppy up and get her rolling.

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