LumberJocks

Baileigh JP-1686 frustrations

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by William Shelley posted 10-02-2018 02:31 AM 831 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

609 posts in 1888 days


10-02-2018 02:31 AM

Hey all,
Video is worth at least a couple thousand words so here we go:

https://youtu.be/5Kyb8u5f3Lg

I’m not sure what I’m expecting from this post. Consolation?

I want to be able to make straight lumber. That’s all I’m asking for. Weighing pros and cons of my options:

1. Selling the machine, getting something else.
2. Trying to modify to make it work better.
3. Scrapping the entire thing and building a new jointer using the motor and cutterhead and tables.
4. Pulling the tables off and turning it into a 16” planer only.
5. Giving up on woodworking and getting into metalworking instead.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective


10 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1905 days


#1 posted 10-02-2018 02:47 AM

Well. The jointer part looks like it sucks.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

609 posts in 1888 days


#2 posted 10-02-2018 02:51 AM


Well. The jointer part looks like it sucks.

- TheFridge

Yeah, I’m kind of leaning towards just turning it into a 16” planer. That part of it actually works well, and it’s better than most because it has motorized lift controls and a pretty accurate digital readout (DRO) for the height/thickness.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 909 days


#3 posted 10-02-2018 02:52 AM

Did you get that new? I looked up the pricing online and it looks to be a $5K machine. For that money, you think this thing would clean your shop and make your coffee at the same time.

I’m not sure if I missed it in the video, but have you spoken to Baileigh about your issues? It seems like there must be something wrong if it can’t maintain a level surface, and it’s hard to believe that the dust collection is working properly. Looks like you could remove more dust if you just held a shop vac underneath it while it was cutting.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8673 posts in 2996 days


#4 posted 10-02-2018 03:01 AM

Speaking with Baileigh is a good idea.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

609 posts in 1888 days


#5 posted 10-02-2018 03:09 AM

For the record, I contacted Baileigh last year after I bought the machine from them and their tech support was very polite, but unable to help. The issue is that Baileigh is just a brand name, they don’t actually manufacture their own tools. Other than providing parts, they’re not able to provide product support because they don’t know anything about their own tools.

And unlike Grizzly, Baileigh doesn’t appear to actually design their tools either. I’m not sure how much design work grizzly does but at the very least their tools have a lot of post-sale tech support.

I bought the machine at a discount as it was a “demo unit”. I paid about $3400 + $500 freight to get it to me. Retail price at the time was I think $6500.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3740 days


#6 posted 10-02-2018 03:31 AM



Did you get that new? I looked up the pricing online and it looks to be a $5K machine. For that money, you think this thing would clean your shop and make your coffee at the same time.

While they don’t make it anymore the retail was more than that when it was sold, however, keep in mind it is about 1/2 the price of the Felder that it is a “poor” copy of when the Felder is equipped with Powerdrive and a Silent Power head.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 909 days


#7 posted 10-02-2018 04:10 AM

While they don t make it anymore the retail was more than that when it was sold, however, keep in mind it is about 1/2 the price of the Felder that it is a “poor” copy of when the Felder is equipped with Powerdrive and a Silent Power head.

- AHuxley

So the Felder made coffee? ;)

It may be a ‘cheap’ copy, but it’s just strange to think that they can’t support something that costs that much. I also can’t imagine what when through their engineers’ heads when they came up with the leveling system. When you engineer something like that, you should always allow as few degrees of freedom as possible. It’s like how you don’t have two taps for a sink in a modern kitchen or bath because trying to control the both the flow and temperature of water with two separate controls is not simple. Trying to level two-axis with four bolts is just a form of torture.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

609 posts in 1888 days


#8 posted 10-02-2018 08:11 AM

UPDATE: It’s worse than I thought. The infeed and outfeed tables are low about 10-15 thou in the center. I have a precision ground 50” straight edge that’s spec’d to 3 thou across it’s length and if I set it lengthwise down the tables I can slip a couple pieces of paper under it in the middle.

This is likely due to the castings being machined before they had fully seasoned. If you look at the manufacturing process for high quality machines, they let the cast iron sit for months or more so that all of it’s internal stresses can work themselves out.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View olwhatshisface's profile

olwhatshisface

5 posts in 310 days


#9 posted 10-02-2018 12:10 PM

If I were you, I’d cut bait on that thing. Sell it. Otherwise everytime you see it, it will remind you of the mistake you made, and make you angry all over again. Unfortunately, I speak from experience. I have a piece of junk jointer of my own that I hate that I’m looking to unload.

We’re woodworkers – making mistakes is part of the game. Do your best to learn from it and move on.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3740 days


#10 posted 10-02-2018 11:10 PM


This is likely due to the castings being machined before they had fully seasoned. If you look at the manufacturing process for high quality machines, they let the cast iron sit for months or more so that all of it s internal stresses can work themselves out.

- William Shelley

It is highly unlikely that any business will be stress relieving their raw castings outdoors tieing up hundreds if not thousands of castings for some period of time when normal thermal stress relief if quick (less than a day) and is much more reliable. Using day to day and seasonal temperature variations is pretty much a crapshoot, doesn’t work in areas with small seasonal temperature extremes and ties up huge amounts of capital.

Usually with a modern machine table, if it potato chips one of two things happened, the thermal cycle for stress relief was somehow compromised or too much was ground off the raw casting.

You are correct that at least the table support is a copy of the AD741 and it may be worth tracking down the Felder technical manual as it may give some insight that is not apparent. It won’t, however, make the tables flat…

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com