LumberJocks

Why is my woodworker's vise tilted down?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by DanTrom posted 10-01-2018 10:35 PM 403 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View DanTrom's profile

DanTrom

5 posts in 292 days


10-01-2018 10:35 PM

Topic tags/keywords: vise woodworkers vise question

I’m hoping this fine community can help me understand the design of this little woodworkers vise. As you can see in the first photo, the two surfaces that mount to the bench are at right angles to one another.


(This image imported upside down – sorry)

However, the inner jaw is thicker at the top than at the bottom. I would have thought that would have just allowed the jaws to close with the upper edge closing first (toe in), but in fact, the whole vice is tilted downwards. The next two photos show that.

This causes anything that’s clamped in the vise to be out of square with my benchtop. It’s not a terrible problem, but one that I’d like to eliminate.

At first, I thought it was a design flaw, or maybe just poor quality (it IS a cheap little vise), but then I saw a whole stack of similar vises at a Lee Valley store (I think they were Ponys) and they all were just like this.

So, two questions –
- Why is this the case? Is there a good reason it would have been designed this way?
- How do I mount this thing so that the inner jaw is perpendicular with my bench top? I imagine shims are in my future.

Thanks in advance for your help!


6 replies so far

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1326 posts in 859 days


#1 posted 10-01-2018 11:22 PM

Assuming you will be adding wood jaw faces, you can cut them to how you would like. It’s how the two pieces of wood come together that matters. Also too you can make them the same height as the top of the bench.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 909 days


#2 posted 10-01-2018 11:40 PM

The vices I work with are either toe-in or parallel, depending if they are a front or end-vise, so I’m not sure what the benefit of having the outside jaw being lower than the inside. As BlasterStumps said, I’d just make it parallel by adjusting the wood you use.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

623 posts in 330 days


#3 posted 10-01-2018 11:42 PM

If you look at the holes in your vise inner and outer jaws, you’ll see where you should attach a wood piece, the size you would like, with screws. This is to protect your wood projects from marks from your metal jaws. The wood you attach can be a hardwood, MDF board, plywood, or plastic. Your preference.

View DanTrom's profile

DanTrom

5 posts in 292 days


#4 posted 10-02-2018 02:50 PM


Assuming you will be adding wood jaw faces, you can cut them to how you would like. It s how the two pieces of wood come together that matters. Also too you can make them the same height as the top of the bench.

- BlasterStumps


Thanks for the reply! True, I could cut the jaw liners at a slight angle to mitigate the angle of the vise. Good idea. That would allow them to be perpendicular to the benchtop. However, the outer jaw would still move in a (slightly) upward direction when closing. At first, that doesn’t seem to be a big deal. I want to be able to use the vise in conjunction with a bench dog to hold workpieces for planing, etc. The angled vise causes the workpiece to be lifted as the vise is tightened. Still thinking… And I’m still curious why the manufacturer would design it like this. There must be some purpose. (or maybe it’s just poor design/execution).

View DanTrom's profile

DanTrom

5 posts in 292 days


#5 posted 10-02-2018 02:51 PM



The vices I work with are either toe-in or parallel, depending if they are a front or end-vise, so I m not sure what the benefit of having the outside jaw being lower than the inside. As BlasterStumps said, I d just make it parallel by adjusting the wood you use.

- lumbering_on


Thanks for the reply! This vice does indeed toe-in just a bit and I like that feature.

View DanTrom's profile

DanTrom

5 posts in 292 days


#6 posted 10-02-2018 02:52 PM



If you look at the holes in your vise inner and outer jaws, you ll see where you should attach a wood piece, the size you would like, with screws. This is to protect your wood projects from marks from your metal jaws. The wood you attach can be a hardwood, MDF board, plywood, or plastic. Your preference.

- WoodenDreams


Thanks for the reply! Yes indeed. I do have plywood jaw liners. Nothing fancy, but they do the job.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com