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Emmett’s Good Stuff Question

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Forum topic by WoodMag posted 10-01-2018 02:16 AM 2452 views 0 times favorited 41 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodMag

25 posts in 295 days


10-01-2018 02:16 AM

Topic tags/keywords: pine finishing question

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to apply this finish to my 10’ x 43” table top?

Do I work in small 2‘ x 2‘ squares or do I covered entirely and wipe it off at once? I was told this is the best stuff for my purpose in the local woodworking shop. I’ve never worked with this particular brand would rather get information prior to applying.

I’ve sanded the table from 60-400 grit (using all increments in between).

I used a small portion of it on a test piece and it gets really tacky to wipe off if it stays on for longer than 3 minutes.

Any particular cloths I need to use when applying and wiping away.


41 replies so far

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

591 posts in 2788 days


#1 posted 10-01-2018 02:43 AM

You can go a thousand different ways with this.

The product is 55% mineral spirits, so it should go on smoothly – apply with a rag; coat the entire surface – if you have enough time before the product starts to tack; then when finished, go over it again to remove any excess. Don’t give any product time to set before you remove excess.

As this is a Pine table (from the #tag), the surface will drink any initial coat. My recommendation is to apply a sealer (my preferred in Zinnser(sp) Seal Coat, two coats); then apply several top-coats. Emmett’s is an oil-based urethane, so the drying time will be longer than a water-borne finish. Regarding a water-borne finish: since the seal coat closes-off the wood fibers, the water-borne finished will not raise the grain. I recommend either one of the General Finishes or Deft (Acrylic) water-borne finishes: they dry crystal clear, will not yellow with age, dry quickly (relative to Oil-based products), and will not give you a headache, from the fumes.

The Emmett’s product receives high praise, so use it per-instructions – but put a seal coat on first.

MJCD

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Aj2

2321 posts in 2214 days


#2 posted 10-01-2018 03:30 AM

I would not use the good stuff for a table that big. I’ve used it for a small butcher block counter top and a few cutting boards. And it tracks up really fast. I bet you will hate it after one coat.
Look for something else.
Why is your table top being held in cauls it looks painful

-- Aj

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WoodMag

25 posts in 295 days


#3 posted 10-01-2018 03:40 AM


I would not use the good stuff for a table that big. I’ve used it for a small butcher block counter top and a few cutting boards. And it tracks up really fast. I bet you will hate it after one coat.
Look for something else.
Why is your table top being held in cauls it looks painful

- Aj2

Is this the sealer?

Zimmer @ Lowes

It’s held in place because it has a slight crowning problem 3/16” and I’m “overcompensating” the crown in the opposite direction for a few days so when I release it from the clamps it stays strait….in theory.

I agree Emmett’s gets VERY tacky quick and I was trying to figure out how to use it on such a large table.

If not Emmett’s, then what do you recommend? I’m not looking for a glossy finish but more of a satin/matte finish.

Still need a sealer prior?

I’m wanting to keep the natural look of the table as I’m staining the legs a dark walnut and want to keep the contrast.

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WoodMag

25 posts in 295 days


#4 posted 10-01-2018 02:59 PM

I actual found the Zinsser Seal Coat

Nowhere local has it so have to order it online. I have 70 sq’ (10’ x 43” top and bottom) with two coats. Gallon covers 400-600 sq’ so a qt should cover 100-150.

I’m know 2 qt will do it, but will 1 qt be all I need?

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MJCD

591 posts in 2788 days


#5 posted 10-01-2018 09:10 PM

Well… respectfully, I disagree with Aj2: if you spend the time and money to build something, you should finish it properly. JMO…

Also, my guess is that the crowning will continue, once you’ve released the cauls. Pine is a difficult wood to create a professional result. Once you do release the cauls, place an aluminum level across the width, and use a hand plane to lower the high spots – take very thin shavings, and take your time. Spending time with a hand plane can do wonders for personal satisfaction… then use a sander to smooth any planning marks, and feather-in spots that need it.

Regarding the Seal Coat, I’ve always ordered it online: it is a well-regarded product. I would order either 2 pints or a quart, if available. A gallon is a very large amount, and may simply take up space; then, go to waste.

I have no experience with Emmett’s; though, I have colleaques who like it. I’m not sure how great it can be, or different it can be, relative to the General Finishes or Deft products. Personally, I stay away from Minmax (Home Depot, Lowes) products, but I may be in the minority here.

Regarding the finishing process, Pine is difficult to smooth to a crisp surface – it tends to fuzz-up (being a very soft wood). I would sand to 400, vaccum the surface well; then re-vaccum – To get as much of the sanding dust off the surface. Apply the Zinsser, and let the product sink-in (you’re purpose is to clog the pores – Zinsser is a varnish, chemically). Once dry (about 4 hours minimum), sand at 400, vaccum well; apply a second coat – let it dry 4 hours minimum; sand at 400 and vaccum. Then, successive coats of whatever you’re going to use. Water-borne finishes usually require more coats than oil-based (they ‘build’ more slowly); however, water-borne finishes have many advantages.

MJCD

View PCDub's profile

PCDub

143 posts in 661 days


#6 posted 10-01-2018 09:36 PM

If not Emmett’s, then what do you recommend? I’m not looking for a glossy finish but more of a satin/matte finish.
- WoodMag


You can go a thousand different ways with this….

As this is a Pine table (from the #tag), the surface will drink any initial coat. My recommendation is to apply a sealer (my preferred in Zinnser(sp) Seal Coat, two coats); then apply several top-coats. Emmett s is an oil-based urethane, so the drying time will be longer than a water-borne finish. Regarding a water-borne finish: since the seal coat closes-off the wood fibers, the water-borne finished will not raise the grain. I recommend either one of the General Finishes or Deft (Acrylic) water-borne finishes: they dry crystal clear, will not yellow with age, dry quickly (relative to Oil-based products), and will not give you a headache, from the fumes.

- MJCD

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

591 posts in 2788 days


#7 posted 10-01-2018 09:40 PM

PCDub – not sure this is a question???

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brtech

1065 posts in 3339 days


#8 posted 10-01-2018 09:47 PM

What? A varnish? So, I looked: varnish is a drying oil, a resin and a solvent. Sealcoat is shellac based, and it has some ethanol and propanol (mineral spirits I assume) so a resin and a solvent.

What’s the drying oil in SealCoat?

It’s not supposed to be a finish coat, which is usually what you use a varnish for.

So why do you call it a varnish?

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2214 days


#9 posted 10-01-2018 10:25 PM

I don’t see why you would need seal coat it’s a alcohol based shellac garbage whatever. Most use it for a wash coat to minimize splotches from staining unruly wood.
For a beginner nothing get more fool proof then Arm r seal .

If your slab has a unfortunate cup across its width it will need to be ripped down the middle and glued back together. Common thing woodworkers have to do

-- Aj

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8670 posts in 2993 days


#10 posted 10-01-2018 10:38 PM

Do all 6 six sides and you’ll be good to go.

I would use:
http://charlesneilwoodworking.3dcartstores.com/Pre-Color-Conditioner--Pre-Mixed--1-Quart--Ready-to-Use_p_47.html?redirect=1

And then wipe on Emmett’s Good stuff for a great finish.

Practice on scrap first.

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

591 posts in 2788 days


#11 posted 10-01-2018 11:19 PM

I guess I’m wrong about what’s in Seal Coat; however, I do know, from long experience, that it is a great first coat.

By the way, these are the thousands of directions you can go…

I’m not here to sell anything. WoodMag… good luck with whatever you do.

MJCD

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WoodMag

25 posts in 295 days


#12 posted 10-01-2018 11:55 PM

I appreciate everyone opinion and viewpoint on what is the “best” way to finish it.

For the crowning, I’m aware it will always be an issue and to help resolve it I’m going to add some 1-2” steel square beams that run across the bottom of the table to help with it crowning again. It might not work at all or it may help…or somewhere in between. If I do nothing it will crown again, that I’m sure of.

Based on the information that I have now and since the table is already sanded to 400 I’m going to use the Zinsser Seal Coat (I actually found some at my local Ag store – 1gal $40), wait overnight, sand it again, vacuum and coat it again. Wait overnight for it to dry, vacuum and use Emmett’s Good Stuff. Hope that’s right.

Right now the bottom is up so I will “experiment” with it and learn from what not to do when doing the top (after I flip it).

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

528 posts in 595 days


#13 posted 10-02-2018 03:28 AM

I personally would not use seal coat on anything new. I think it’s somewhat a useless product on new wood.

If you want something to wipe on, I like minwax wipe on poly just cause it’s easy and already mixed. Have had good luck with it. Haven’t used it in awhile though, spray everything now.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117652 posts in 3994 days


#14 posted 10-02-2018 03:55 AM

I agree with using CN Blotch control first since Pine has a terrible reputation for blotching. Arm-R-Seal is a great product very durable and the Oil brings out the grain beautifully. The two things I have problems with oil base products are the smell and longer open time that needs a more dust free atmosphere. If you have the equipment to spray it that’s the approach I would take. As far, an alternative finish think about spraying a pre-cat lacquer from Sherwin Williams.

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WoodMag

25 posts in 295 days


#15 posted 10-02-2018 05:30 AM


I personally would not use seal coat on anything new. I think it’s somewhat a useless product on new wood.

If you want something to wipe on, I like minwax wipe on poly just cause it’s easy and already mixed. Have had good luck with it. Haven’t used it in awhile though, spray everything now.

- CWWoodworking

Why not a sealer? I’m aware everyone has a preference but is there a reason it’s worthless?


I agree with using CN Blotch control first since Pine has a terrible reputation for blotching. Arm-R-Seal is a great product very durable and the Oil brings out the grain beautifully. The two things I have problems with oil base products are the smell and longer open time that needs a more dust free atmosphere. If you have the equipment to spray it that s the approach I would take. As far, an alternative finish think about spraying a pre-cat lacquer from Sherwin Williams.

- a1Jim

Is the Arm-n-Seal used as a replacement for Zinsser Seal Coat or in addition to?

I honestly just love the different options everyone is bringing to the table… haha.

Perhaps I should go down the local wood shop and grab some longer pieces of wood and give it a few test runs on different options.

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