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Forum topic by MrRon posted 09-29-2018 05:32 PM 1461 views 0 times favorited 70 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

5430 posts in 3602 days


09-29-2018 05:32 PM

I have heard many complaints from people who buy on-line and were not happy with the outcome. This isn’t limited to major purchases such as machinery, but also to everyday things, like those “as seen on TV” items. I have been following all such complaints, mostly out of curiosity, but also so I personally don’t fall victim. It usually takes just one or maybe two bad experiences before skepticism becomes a part of the shopping experience. This post is prompted by the complaints I read on this forum and the questions people ask about purchasing tools, usually on-line. It would be of interest to many to hear from others who have become victim to on-line shopping.


70 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5499 posts in 2851 days


#1 posted 09-29-2018 06:05 PM

Not sure what you mean “victim to online shopping”, but we buy a huge amount of stuff on line. Have I been shorted/cheated/disappointed? Sure, a few times. But when you deal with vendors that you trust the complaints are very minimal, and resolved to the customers satisfaction. We live in what most consider a rural area, and trying to find something at the local stores usually involves running all over trying to locate the item….and even then not finding it. As for tools, all of my major new tool purchases have been on line, and most (probably 90%) of my smaller tool purchases have been on line.

Oops, one small correction: I did buy my drill press locally (1992) when a local box store had them marked for clearance.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5233 posts in 2667 days


#2 posted 09-29-2018 06:29 PM

Seems like the whole world is shopping online to the point it killing many brick and mortar stores and killing shopping malls. I figure with so many people doing it, it can be all that bad.

You just have to use common sense and remember caveat emptor (buyer beware). You have some responsible too.

Common sense has kept me away from those late night TV commercials.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1147 posts in 1919 days


#3 posted 09-29-2018 06:47 PM

I’ve made dozens of purchases on-line and only once have I had a bad experience. It was an ebay purchase where the item was not listed accurately and what I received was not what I expected. The seller was a total pain about taking the item back and ebay ended up refunding me my money. The seller attempted to update the item information but ebay keeps history of changes and it showed where the original listing did not correctly describe the item.

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AHuxley

874 posts in 3680 days


#4 posted 09-29-2018 07:04 PM

My family has made upwards of 10,000 online purchases over the last 20 or so years. Just counting myself I have gotten 11 shipments just this week. The vast majority of our purchases non-food related are online. Everything from $2-3 items to $10k+. Out of all those, I can only think of 2 I had an issue with (now my wife exchanges clothes/shoes fairly regularly for size issues). One Amazon sent the wrong item and the other was damaged in shipping. It is extremely easy to vet online sellers. I do see people asking about the silly Facebook tool ads for 1/2 current street price where the site is a week or so old and registered in China but yo have the be very internet naive to get caught by those. I also buy quite a bit on eBay, maybe 50 purchases a year, eBay has the strongest buyer protection anywhere on the web.

I can’t even fathom how much we have saved over the last 20 years with online purchases, it is easily $50k and more likely over $100k.

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MrRon

5430 posts in 3602 days


#5 posted 09-29-2018 07:38 PM

On-line retailers have been killing off local businesses with their lower prices, “no tax” and free shipping. It looks like the trend may be reversing. I have heard brick and mortar stores are coming back Amazon announced they are going to open hundreds of B&M stores in major cities; that may be in response to the government requiring on-line vendors to charge tax.Target stores is one that has been showing positive growth through innovation.

Buying on-line has always been risky. On one post on this forum I just read, someone wanted to order a $1.88 part, but the shipping was $20. That has swayed many including myself from ordering on-line. One of the biggest complaints has been receiving damaged goods. sometimes it has been resolved and other times not. Either way, it requires much action on the part of the consumer to get the situation resolved. I’m sure most would prefer to see the item in person than unseen a thousand miles away. Sure I have bought things on-line, but only if I can’t find it locally. It’s a way for me to support my local businesses and to get support if the item doesn’t satisfy. Several months ago, I ordered a mattress on-line because it was “free shipping”; well after two weeks, I get an e-mail telling me “they were sorry about the delay and were reordering and that I would receive it in a week”. A week later, it still hadn’t arrived, so I called and was informed of the delay. I cancelled the order and bought the mattress locally. It could have been delivered free in a few days, but not wanting to wait, I went and picked it up myself. I’m sure you will be hearing more complaints in the future. Americans have always been able to give others the benefit of doubt, but there comes a time when people will rise up and say enough is enough; We want value and service for our hard earned dollars and we demand it. You may have noticed Europeans are more demanding about their purchases than we are. From my experience, they won’t accept shoddy goods. That same goes for people all around the world. I see all the time, we as Americans accepting shoddy goods because it is inconvenient to return it (on-line purchase).

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MrRon

5430 posts in 3602 days


#6 posted 09-29-2018 07:49 PM


My family has made upwards of 10,000 online purchases over the last 20 or so years. Just counting myself I have gotten 11 shipments just this week. The vast majority of our purchases non-food related are online. Everything from $2-3 items to $10k+. Out of all those, I can only think of 2 I had an issue with (now my wife exchanges clothes/shoes fairly regularly for size issues). One Amazon sent the wrong item and the other was damaged in shipping. It is extremely easy to vet online sellers. I do see people asking about the silly Facebook tool ads for 1/2 current street price where the site is a week or so old and registered in China but yo have the be very internet naive to get caught by those. I also buy quite a bit on eBay, maybe 50 purchases a year, eBay has the strongest buyer protection anywhere on the web.

I can t even fathom how much we have saved over the last 20 years with online purchases, it is easily $50k and more likely over $100k.

- AHuxley


The only place that I deal with on a steady basis is McMaster-Carr. They always have what I need. The shipping is a bit high, but I receive my order, usually within two or three days. I buy on-line when what I need is not available locally.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1864 posts in 2675 days


#7 posted 09-29-2018 07:55 PM

I buy online as much as possible. The local stores rarely carry the quality/specialty products I want and it’s difficult to judge the usefulness of an item by looking at the fancy packaging.

I find the cost of gas and the time spent driving to stores is often more expensive than the cost of shipping. A round trip from the shop to Menards costs $2.75 in gas, plus wear and tear on the truck and consumes at least 45 minutes of my time. $15 for shipping is cheap by comparison.

Local shopping trips are usually done when I need to run other errands in the area or if I need something right away.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3467 posts in 2216 days


#8 posted 09-29-2018 07:56 PM

The only online purchases I have made were for parts that my local suppliers said they would have to order them online. So if they are going to order them and I can order from the same supplier then I will. Unless it’s a Datsun part then I’m forced to order online. I have ordered maybe 10 things from online one was a nightmare but was made right after telling the seller I have the return address and we can talk about your misleading advertisement in person. He was quick to send me the right item. I will be ordering a new battery for my phone from amazon. I went to buy it from a local battery store they don’t have them but will have to order one it will be a month for their brand or they can order it off amazon and have it shipped to me. They will be buying from a seller that the battery is $20 shipped with the tools to replace it but they will be charging me their retail price of $145 for the battery just to place a amazon order. I will order it myself

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5233 posts in 2667 days


#9 posted 09-29-2018 08:11 PM

I do like buying form brick and mortar stores as much as possible. I like to see/fell before buying if possible. Many items are just not available in stores so for many things I have to go to online stores.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 848 days


#10 posted 09-29-2018 08:21 PM


On-line retailers have been killing off local businesses with their lower prices, “no tax” and free shipping. It looks like the trend may be reversing. I have heard brick and mortar stores are coming back Amazon announced they are going to open hundreds of B&M stores in major cities; that may be in response to the government requiring on-line vendors to charge tax.Target stores is one that has been showing positive growth through innovation.

Buying on-line has always been risky. On one post on this forum I just read, someone wanted to order a $1.88 part, but the shipping was $20. That has swayed many including myself from ordering on-line. One of the biggest complaints has been receiving damaged goods. sometimes it has been resolved and other times not. Either way, it requires much action on the part of the consumer to get the situation resolved. I m sure most would prefer to see the item in person than unseen a thousand miles away. Sure I have bought things on-line, but only if I can t find it locally. It s a way for me to support my local businesses and to get support if the item doesn t satisfy. Several months ago, I ordered a mattress on-line because it was “free shipping”; well after two weeks, I get an e-mail telling me “they were sorry about the delay and were reordering and that I would receive it in a week”. A week later, it still hadn t arrived, so I called and was informed of the delay. I cancelled the order and bought the mattress locally. It could have been delivered free in a few days, but not wanting to wait, I went and picked it up myself. I m sure you will be hearing more complaints in the future. Americans have always been able to give others the benefit of doubt, but there comes a time when people will rise up and say enough is enough; We want value and service for our hard earned dollars and we demand it. You may have noticed Europeans are more demanding about their purchases than we are. From my experience, they won t accept shoddy goods. That same goes for people all around the world. I see all the time, we as Americans accepting shoddy goods because it is inconvenient to return it (on-line purchase).

- MrRon

That was me who had the issue with the $20 for a $1.88 part. To be fair it was a replacement part for a track saw, and wasn’t something that was a common order. Still, if there was a factory repair center nearby, as most companies used to have, the part would likely have cost a few dollars more, but there would have been no shipping. In the end, I made a wooden replacement which works, although it would be nice to have an actually part and not a shop-built replacement.

I actually avoid buying online for the most part, and not really because I find it a ripoff. I just like to be able to go to a store, see the product up close, feel it, and try it out if possible. I’ve been buying things off Amazon for eight years, but I’ve literally spent more at Lowes, Home Depot and Canadian tire in one visit than I’ve spent all that time on Amazon.

I think the online model is actually detrimental in many respects to merchants. I can go on Amazon look around and just say, nah, close up the browser and go about my day. Now, get me into Lee Valley, the Borg or Canadian Tire, and suddenly I discover several items I never knew I needed.

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3202 posts in 3885 days


#11 posted 09-29-2018 08:31 PM

I find that returning things to Amazon is usually easier than returning them to a real store. Many times I just print a pre-paid UPS label from Amazon and in a few days the UPS truck comes to my house to get the package. What could be easier?

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 848 days


#12 posted 09-29-2018 08:35 PM



I find that returning things to Amazon is usually easier than returning them to a real store. Many times I just print a pre-paid UPS label from Amazon and in a few days the UPS truck comes to my house to get the package. What could be easier?

- ChuckV

Not having to return an item because you bought it in a store and knew exactly what you were buying? ;) :)

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ChuckV

3202 posts in 3885 days


#13 posted 09-29-2018 09:55 PM

Almost all of my Amazon returns have been for failures that could not be detected by touching the outside of the product packaging, so buying at a store would not have helped.

I really enjoy shopping in some stores, talking with the employees, and just browsing around. Others drive me away. We bought a laptop at Best Buy. In a few days, one of the keys starting sticking. We returned it and got a replacement. But we had to listen to the snotty employee tell us that we better buy the Protection Plan because if the key had failed after 30 days, we would have paid a minimum of $150, lost our US citizenship, and worked the rest of our days in the salt mines, or something like that.

The CPU fan on the new one lasted about a week. We returned it for a refund.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View squazo's profile

squazo

124 posts in 2003 days


#14 posted 09-29-2018 10:10 PM

I bought a saw from evolution power tools,through amazon I think. It was total garbage the motor burnt out, warranty was not honored so they sold me a motor at cost it burnt out and then they stopped answering my emails. Other than that just minor shipping issues mostly.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11485 posts in 3787 days


#15 posted 09-29-2018 10:12 PM

We buy most non food items…and a few non perishable food items on line. But, we’re 100+ miles from any wood working stores. And, it’s a 50 mile RT to a decent hardware store.
Amazon, E Bay, and Costco get most of our on line business.
As JAAune said, it’s very convenirent and, far less expensive in time and $$ to buy on line.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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