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Forum topic by Dan Thomas posted 09-26-2018 09:36 PM 1057 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dan Thomas

160 posts in 413 days


09-26-2018 09:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question metric

On my YouTube channel, I do everything in inches. Occasionally I get requests from users to show metric values also. And now that I’m getting ready to release my first set of plans (PDF), I really need to figure this out.

Here’s a picture, with Imperial measurements on top, and metric measurements on the bottom (auto-converted by SketchUp). The places where it’s still Imperial are text that SketchUp doesn’t automatically convert:

So here’s my questions:

1) Should I leave the “Clamp Face” dimensions at “114.3mm”, and “44.5mm”? Or should I change them to some nice, round numbers? The dimensions were fairly arbitrary to begin with.

2) When I use something like a 1/4” carriage bolt, should I leave it like that, or change it to a 6mm or 7mm carriage bolt? The problem is, I don’t know what sizes are common for metric carriage bolts. What if I say “7mm”, and they’re actually hard to find? I wouldn’t have any way to know.

3) What about things like ”#6×1/2” wood screw”?

4) What about dimensional lumber? Should I call it 3/4” plywood, or something else?

5) Or, should I just leave everything in Imperial and let the users figure out what they want to do?

Anything you can tell me to help me understand the needs of my metric users would be greatly appreciated.

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker


34 replies so far

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 906 days


#1 posted 09-26-2018 09:42 PM

I’ll be jiggered if I can figure it out. I’m Canadian so we use metric, unless we don’t. Here’s how things work here

Weight – lbs
Your own height – feet and inches
Speed limits – km/hr
distance – km
height of a building – m or stories.
woodworking – always imperial, unless you’re using metric machine screws or bolts

We’re basically a mess up here.

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Dan Thomas

160 posts in 413 days


#2 posted 09-26-2018 10:24 PM

Well, you’re no help! LOL.

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 906 days


#3 posted 09-26-2018 10:37 PM

That’s what the metric system does to you. :)

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

675 posts in 2352 days


#4 posted 09-26-2018 10:37 PM

I would leave everything imperial and let them figure it out personally. Honestly those that use metric probably better equipped to convert than the other way around from my experiences.

I don’t mind plans in metric just convert to imperial and round to nearest use able fraction.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6205 posts in 1129 days


#5 posted 09-26-2018 10:48 PM

Dutchys plans are from Holland yes they are all metric so no problem for me I just measure the piece thats how I convert it over and we are talking precise models here … not a clamp :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Dan Thomas

160 posts in 413 days


#6 posted 09-26-2018 11:44 PM

Well, I like what I hear so far. It means no extra work for me. :)

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

632 posts in 1878 days


#7 posted 09-26-2018 11:50 PM

So I am in Southern Nevada and rarely use metric myself. But I have seen posts from users here on LJ for example that were in metric. I don’t remember seeing any conversions on anyone else’s plans or projects.
However, if it is a simple change with SketchUp. I think I would round numbers for sure.
As for Hardware, do you have a favorite hardware store. Like Mcfadden-Dale.
http://mcfaddendalehardware.com/location.html
They have a pretty amazing inventory of metric hardware. I doubt they stock both a 6mm and 7mm carriage bolt.
What they do stock, I bet is most common.
Here is a conversion chart. Seems Metric may be a bit more simple.
Imperial has 1/4X20 or 1/4X28 thread, where metric would be m6X1.
https://elginfasteners.com/resources/metric-bolt-conversion-metric-to-standard-bolt-conversion/
I am curious now, on how wood screws are labeled in Europe. The chart shows both a decimal and millimeter conversion.
As for the lumber, Most plywood already has a metric measurement listed. Funny, Baltic Birch is listed as 5’X5’ sheet with a metric thickness.
Personally, I have never built anything from a store bought plan. And if it was in metric I would skip it just because I would need to convert it to imperial. So if our metric using friends feel the same as I, then converting is a must for you. Will be interesting to read there comments here.

-- John

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Dan Thomas

160 posts in 413 days


#8 posted 09-27-2018 12:01 AM

Well, one thing I’m doing is uploading SketchUp models, and encouraging people to view them. I recently posted a tutorial on how to view them, so I may just point people to the model and say “Watch my video, learn how to view the models, then change the model to metric”. We’ll see.

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7487 posts in 3784 days


#9 posted 09-27-2018 06:09 PM

I don’t use Sketchup, I use Fusion 360 or Creo Elements Direct, both of which can supply dual dimensions.
But, specifying hardware is problematic.
This Web site from the UK may help with wood screws.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Dan Thomas

160 posts in 413 days


#10 posted 09-27-2018 06:37 PM

Thanks! And regarding your quote of “I never met a board I didn’t like”, you must’ve never been hit with kickback before, right? :p (Just kidding. Kind of.)

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

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Woodknack

12842 posts in 2797 days


#11 posted 09-27-2018 06:57 PM

Put them in fractions, 33/100 meter. Bonus points for improper fractions, 134/100 cm. Teach those commies the American way. But I would round up to whole numbers when possible, 33.47/100 meter is just being mean.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Dan Thomas

160 posts in 413 days


#12 posted 09-27-2018 08:14 PM

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000

2859 posts in 1316 days


#13 posted 09-27-2018 08:21 PM

It seems to me that metric always has whole numbers. (for example: I don’t ever see 19.3mm. )

It may be easier for you to draw the model in metric (whole numbers) then use sketchup to convert it to Imperial. We can all figure out decimals. For bolts, you would have to find the metric equivalents and use them in your drawings.

Just food for thought, I don’t know what would be best.

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waho6o9

8670 posts in 2993 days


#14 posted 09-27-2018 08:22 PM

LOL

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Dan Thomas

160 posts in 413 days


#15 posted 09-27-2018 08:47 PM

jbay – Thanks, I was thinking that also, as far as just redrawing it. But I think at this point, I’m gonna leave it as is. If I get requests from people for metric versions, I’ll see if someone wants to volunteer to to the conversion for everyone.

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

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