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Wood ID: European hardwood with quilt/chatoyance?

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Forum topic by JohnMcClure posted 09-13-2018 12:53 AM 471 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JohnMcClure

621 posts in 1028 days


09-13-2018 12:53 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question wood id

Pulled this chunk out of a firewood pile in Ireland a few months ago.

End grain: (yellow paint was my sealer, scraped some off for the pic)

Flatsawn grain:

Quartersawn grain:

Hard to capture the quartersawn chatoyance. That surface is smooth, just looks 3d bumpy because of the grain.

Medularry rays are very pronounced.
I’m not particularly knowledgeable but thinking sycamore maple, maple, beech? Anyone know this wood?

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail


6 replies so far

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splintergroup

2681 posts in 1610 days


#1 posted 09-13-2018 07:30 PM

Sycamore was first to pop in my head, growth ring spacing looks about right too.

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000

2859 posts in 1286 days


#2 posted 09-13-2018 07:35 PM

Sycamore to me also

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AZWoody

1449 posts in 1611 days


#3 posted 09-13-2018 09:30 PM

3rd vote for sycamore. The only other wood I’ve seen that has that quartersawn effect is salt cedar but the rest of the wood definitely does not look like it.

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Kazooman

1317 posts in 2340 days


#4 posted 09-13-2018 10:08 PM

Wood ID aside, the quartersawn look is great, the flatsawn not so much. So here is my question: “how do you optimize the use of such a small chunk of wood. to take advantage of the natural characteristics?”.

Quartersawing pieces would give some nicely figured stock, but precious little based on the size of the chunk. I guess slicing it into veneer would maximize that.

How about turners? What would be the best of the three main axes for mounting and turning a piece to optimize the natural grain?

Either way, that crack is going to hurt!

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JohnMcClure

621 posts in 1028 days


#5 posted 09-14-2018 02:09 AM



Wood ID aside, the quartersawn look is great, the flatsawn not so much. So here is my question: “how do you optimize the use of such a small chunk of wood. to take advantage of the natural characteristics?”.

Quartersawing pieces would give some nicely figured stock, but precious little based on the size of the chunk. I guess slicing it into veneer would maximize that.

How about turners? What would be the best of the three main axes for mounting and turning a piece to optimize the natural grain?

Either way, that crack is going to hurt!

- Kazooman

Agreed that QS is the best way to saw this.
I cut it 1/4” thick, got about 7 little boards of varying widths.
It is to be a box for a friend, at whose wedding in Ireland I picked up the block of firewood.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

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Kazooman

1317 posts in 2340 days


#6 posted 09-14-2018 12:30 PM

That should be enough to make a very pretty box. A unique memento of the wedding that I am certain your friends will cherish. Great idea! Show us the finished product.

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