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Beeswax mineral oil

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Forum topic by Canon posted 09-07-2018 10:01 PM 1235 views 0 times favorited 40 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Canon

70 posts in 1370 days


09-07-2018 10:01 PM

Hi
Need some advice.. I make cheese and crackers boards and I use mineral oil on them then coat it with beeswax mineral oil combination.

I was thinking of selling my homemade brew in 4 oz containers. Has anyone else done this before, do you need to get some kind of permits?
Thanks
Greg


40 replies so far

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 910 days


#1 posted 09-07-2018 10:17 PM

It depends on where and how you’re selling them. Selling them locally would normally require a local vendor’s permit, while selling them online you’d just need to make sure you are registered if they’re are sales taxes to be collected.

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Canon

70 posts in 1370 days


#2 posted 09-07-2018 10:31 PM

Thanks.. selling locally, how would obtain a permit from the local board of health? Are there certain wordings that you need to put on the container in terms of the ingredients?

Selling online, registered how and with what organization

Tks

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 910 days


#3 posted 09-07-2018 10:37 PM



Thanks.. selling locally, how would obtain a permit from the local board of health? Are there certain wordings that you need to put on the container in terms of the ingredients?

Selling online, registered how and with what organization

Tks

- Canon

You would just have to go online to find the forms for your local area. As for local health regulations, I’m not sure that would be necessary to get a health permit, but that would be specific to your local area, and regulations can vary quite a bit. However, if all the ingredients are part of the GRAS database, then there shouldn’t be any need.

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John Smith

1884 posts in 583 days


#4 posted 09-07-2018 11:09 PM

are you selling your boards now ??
for starters, I would include the 4oz bottle of oil with the board
and increase the price just a tad to cover everything and still make the profit.
when/if the time comes that people want to purchase the oil separately,
then you could explore that avenue when it presents itself.
in the meantime – conduct a search to see what similar items are on the market now.
best of luck in all your adventures !!

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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CWWoodworking

528 posts in 599 days


#5 posted 09-08-2018 01:29 AM

Personally I would not get in the finishing business. I have a poplar cutting board that is 15+ years old. and haven’t rubbed it with anything besides bacon fat and pork butt since I made it. Still works perfect.

How does the wax/mineral oil work? My understanding is the mineral oil doesnt “dry” while the wax does.

My board is more about function than looking pretty though.

View Richard's profile

Richard

11274 posts in 3453 days


#6 posted 09-08-2018 02:30 AM


Personally I would not get in the finishing business. I have a poplar cutting board that is 15+ years old. and haven t rubbed it with anything besides bacon fat and pork butt since I made it. Still works perfect.

How does the wax/mineral oil work? My understanding is the mineral oil doesnt “dry” while the wax does.

My board is more about function than looking pretty though.

- CWWoodworking

I agree with CW. I have 2 Functional Solid Wood Cutting Boards that are about 8 years old. They Have never seen any kind of a Finish except the ones mentioned by CW. They are always well cleaned after every use.

I only use Mineral Oil for what it was initially intended. DEF: A distillate of petroleum (especially one used medicinally as a laxative or stool softener)

Mineral Oil IS Safe to use as a Wood Finish. Just be sure it’s FDA approved for Human Consumption.

Oil on Wood? I use PURE Tung Oil or Danish Oil as shown below from Lee Valley.

Rick S.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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Rich

4565 posts in 1010 days


#7 posted 09-08-2018 05:23 AM


Personally I would not get in the finishing business. I have a poplar cutting board that is 15+ years old. and haven t rubbed it with anything besides bacon fat and pork butt since I made it. Still works perfect.

- CWWoodworking

Ever heard of oxidation? Fifteen years of animal fat will turn rancid. It won’t kill you, but it’s disgusting to think anyone was fed food prepared on that board.

Besides, any finish is food safe once it’s cured. Assuming you keep the board clean that is, and animal fat does not cure, it goes rancid.

Here’s what Bob Flexner has to say about food safe finishes:

———————————————————————————————————————-

In fact, all finishes are safe to eat off of or be chewed on once the finish has fully cured. The rule of thumb for curing is 30 days, but warm conditions make curing happen faster. With all solvent-based finishes, you can determine that a finish has cured sufficiently by pressing your nose against the dry finish and sniffing. If there is any odor, the finish isn’t yet cured. Only if you can’t smell anything is the object safe for food or mouth contact.

Flexner, Bob. Understanding Wood Finishing: How to Select and Apply the Right Finish (American Woodworker) (p. 76). Fox Chapel Publishing. Kindle Edition.

■ No Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), required by the government to list all hazardous or toxic effects of a product, warns against contact with food or children’s mouths for any oil or varnish finish, or for any other finish.

■ The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lists all common driers as safe for food contact as long as the finish is made properly— that is, as long as the finish cures. (The FDA doesn’t “approve” of finishes as some manufacturers claim. The FDA approves of ingredients and sets rules for testing that a finish cures properly.)

■ You have never heard of anyone (adult or child) being poisoned by contact with a cured clear finish. If someone had been poisoned, you can bet it would have made the news!

Let’s finally put this myth to bed and use other, more legitimate, criteria for choosing a finish.

Flexner, Bob. Understanding Wood Finishing: How to Select and Apply the Right Finish (American Woodworker) (p. 76). Fox Chapel Publishing. Kindle Edition.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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CWWoodworking

528 posts in 599 days


#8 posted 09-08-2018 08:43 PM

Rich, I clean it very well and dont use the animal fat as a “finish”. But you know there is fat that soaked into the wood. No matter how much you clean a wood cutting board, there will always be something left. The wax and mineral oil isnt stopping it either. So what is the difference?

My point was you dont really need to finish a cutting board. I think it looks kinda weird when you have wax or oil over a heavily used board. Like your trying to make it look perdy except its got cuts all over it.

To each their own though.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2729 days


#9 posted 09-08-2018 09:15 PM

Please just listen to the first 20 seconds of this video by Charles Neil.

https://youtu.be/g2rTy3W-QEY

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3103 posts in 994 days


#10 posted 09-08-2018 09:34 PM

Truer words never spoken. I had always been a proponent of regular application of MO, sometimes with wax, but after seeing that video a while back I stopped making cutting boards for a while, and did some testing of my own. My next cutting boards will have Arm r Seal on them.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Peteybadboy

802 posts in 2370 days


#11 posted 09-08-2018 09:39 PM

I think John Smith gave you good marketing advice. Make it a very small bottle.

-- Petey

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12843 posts in 2800 days


#12 posted 09-08-2018 11:30 PM

Mineral oil is just for looks. If I sold cutting boards, I would definitely smear on some Howard’s to make them pretty but it isn’t necessary.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Richard's profile

Richard

11274 posts in 3453 days


#13 posted 09-09-2018 12:38 AM



Please just listen to the first 20 seconds of this video by Charles Neil.

https://youtu.be/g2rTy3W-QEY

- AlaskaGuy

AG: Very Interesting!

Rick S.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2729 days


#14 posted 09-09-2018 01:07 AM



Mineral oil is just for looks. If I sold cutting boards, I would definitely smear on some Howard s to make them pretty but it isn t necessary.

- Woodknack

Don’t know if this is true but it always seem to make sense to me. When an end grain cutting board is new it’s quite porous. Applying mineral until the board is saturated with oil and reapplying periodically would fill the pours with oil and keep meat juices , water etc from soaking into the board.

Skip to the 9:30 mark and this guy soaks his boards in mineral oil.

https://youtu.be/TmnBh6WwYT4

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2729 days


#15 posted 09-09-2018 01:17 AM


Please just listen to the first 20 seconds of this video by Charles Neil.

https://youtu.be/g2rTy3W-QEY

- AlaskaGuy

AG: Very Interesting!

Rick S.

- Rick S.


I did too.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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