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Latex, Acrylic, Enamel - Lost! What's best for semi gloss interior/durable?

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Forum topic by PatrickIrish posted 09-07-2018 04:35 PM 1877 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PatrickIrish

143 posts in 2468 days


09-07-2018 04:35 PM

I might be over researching here but seem to have confused myself with the different latex paints and paints they call latex.

I’m building a large dog crate kennel that will go inside a clients house and be seen by all. She wants semi gloss white. I want it to be durable as the top will be used for a TV and being in the family room, likely to get banged into and of course, used for dogs.

I was thinking just behr semi gloss white, 2 coats and a poly clear after. But after reading, I’m concerned the paint wont last and be gummy.

Behr and sherwan williams make a modified urathane enamel listed for trim and cabinets. It’s waterbased but seems to be different than just latex.

is 100% acrylic paint the same as latex? What should I go with for this? I have plenty of free white paint available if any semi gloss white will do the trick.

Client isn’t picky as I’m likely making fancier than planned.


10 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5595 posts in 2915 days


#1 posted 09-07-2018 04:45 PM

I’m hoping those in the know will answer this, it’s a question I keep asking. But here’s what i suggest: Pick a 100% acrylic for your crate/table. Latex (as in wall paint) might have a property called “blocking”, which means anything pressing against it for a short time will stick to it. The confusion (to me) is that 100% acrylic is often labeled latex, but not all latex is 100% acrylic (check the label). Now, the SW counter guy told me that SW paints are all 100% acrylic, so with anything they sell you would be safe. the acrylic is also more durable (IMHO) than wall paint latex. I’ve tried to figure out what the “oil modified urethanes” are, and have had no success…maybe someone knows the answer to that as well. But they are very durable and any of them should also work for you. I hope some more specific info shows up.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

746 posts in 1525 days


#2 posted 09-07-2018 10:46 PM

I read something recently that none of the “latex” paints actually have latex polymers in them. Most of the cheaper and older wall paint have vinyl polymers. The better “acrylic” paints actually use acrylic polymers and are better and more durable. I’m no paint chemist and I don’t know what a polymer is. Just what I read.

More to PatricIrish’s question: I have found that using a high gloss acrylic paint and applying it with a foam roller gives a final finish that I like. The foam roller eliminates brush marks and leaves a very slight orange peel texture that, to me, looks like a semi gloss, but is much smoother and easier to clean. When I was buying some paint recently, the salesperson tried to steer me to some expensive acrylic paint formulated for kitchen cabinets. Supposedly it is more durable and smoother. I didn’t buy it, but it might be something for you to look into.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 912 days


#3 posted 09-07-2018 10:55 PM


I read something recently that none of the “latex” paints actually have latex polymers in them. Most of the cheaper and older wall paint have vinyl polymers. The better “acrylic” paints actually use acrylic polymers and are better and more durable. I m no paint chemist and I don t know what a polymer is. Just what I read.

More to PatricIrish s question: I have found that using a high gloss acrylic paint and applying it with a foam roller gives a final finish that I like. The foam roller eliminates brush marks and leaves a very slight orange peel texture that, to me, looks like a semi gloss, but is much smoother and easier to clean. When I was buying some paint recently, the salesperson tried to steer me to some expensive acrylic paint formulated for kitchen cabinets. Supposedly it is more durable and smoother. I didn t buy it, but it might be something for you to look into.

- bilyo

Just to let you know, the term polymer is often thrown around as a marketing ploy. Just saying something is a polymer is rather useless, at it just means a molecule made up of repeating chains. Just as an example, starch and cellulose are almost the exact same in that they are glucose molecules bonded together. However, the bonds in starch breakdown very easily in water, while those in cellulose make furniture.

No doubt from what I’ve seen that acrylic is better but when a sales person just throws out terms like ‘polymer’ without any context, it makes me roll my eyes. Mind you, the worst is when you read or hear a product described as ‘chemical free’ or ‘contains no chemicals’, which means it doesn’t exist.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

528 posts in 601 days


#4 posted 09-08-2018 01:40 AM

PPG Breakthrough

I use this quite a bit. It is a very solid product. Dries in 30min, hard, durable, flexible.

It is a dream to spray with a fine finish tip and airless.

I have used both Behr and SW products. They are not even close to Breakthrough IMHO.

And if you find the right supplier, it can be 20-30$ cheaper per gallon. Look for a small-ish hardware store that carries Porter paints. Ask about it. Porter paint stores will want to charge you about 60-70$. I buy mine for 40$. I do buy a lot though. 200-500$ a month.

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swirt

3971 posts in 3394 days


#5 posted 09-08-2018 03:02 AM

I have had good luck with just an interior latex or acrylic latex paint and then cover it with two coats of water based poly. The poly prevents the paint from blocking and being tacky… which is a real problem when painting with the humidity in Florida. I have had good success with using a gloss paint, then choosing the sheen of the waterbased poly to determine the final sheen.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5595 posts in 2915 days


#6 posted 09-08-2018 10:48 AM

It’s my belief that the important difference is the “vinyl” versus “acrylic” polymers that Bilyo mentioned. But like all things in finishes/paint, ferreting out the truth ain’t easy.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View hkmiller's profile

hkmiller

139 posts in 504 days


#7 posted 09-09-2018 02:05 AM



PPG Breakthrough

I use this quite a bit. It is a very solid product. Dries in 30min, hard, durable, flexible.

It is a dream to spray with a fine finish tip and airless.

I have used both Behr and SW products. They are not even close to Breakthrough IMHO.

And if you find the right supplier, it can be 20-30$ cheaper per gallon. Look for a small-ish hardware store that carries Porter paints. Ask about it. Porter paint stores will want to charge you about 60-70$. I buy mine for 40$. I do buy a lot though. 200-500$ a month.

- CWWoodworking

I used Breakthrough to pant pantry shelves. Great paint, rolls easy with smooth finish. Very durable.

-- always something

View PatrickIrish's profile

PatrickIrish

143 posts in 2468 days


#8 posted 09-10-2018 06:40 PM

PPG breakthrough in California is supposedly not good as the regular PPG 250 that most use.

I’m leaning toward Aristoshield, cabinet coat, or pro classic from sherwian williams

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000

2859 posts in 1321 days


#9 posted 09-10-2018 06:58 PM

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BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2381 days


#10 posted 09-10-2018 09:21 PM

I HATE LATEX.

Oil paint goes on more smoothly, lasts longer, cleans more easily, and always gives a better finish. Even inside my home, I went back to oil for my baseboards and they look better and have held up much longer than the latex enamel that was used last time.

Oil is smelly and hard to clean. So commercial painters and big box stores say to use latex. But they don’t have to live with it. For trim, wood, outdoor, or anything but crafts and walls, I stay away from Latex paints.

I even tried Polycrylic topcoat on my last project for interior cabinets. Not doing that again.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

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