LumberJocks

Removing Wax from Bell forest lumber?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Peteybadboy posted 09-05-2018 07:13 PM 1171 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

791 posts in 2366 days


09-05-2018 07:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wax

Recently I received some small blanks from Bell Forest.

What is the best way to remove the wax the Bell forest coats their lumber?

I don’t want to run it through my Jointer or planer or sander to remove it, fearing I’d just gunk up those tools.

Any advice would be great.

Thanks

-- Petey


19 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1902 days


#1 posted 09-05-2018 07:19 PM

Depends on what you’re doing. Scrape it off maybe. If it’s for turning I really wouldn’t worry about it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1876 posts in 579 days


#2 posted 09-05-2018 07:40 PM

I cut the ends off square and onto the lathe – not to worry about the wax.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

791 posts in 2366 days


#3 posted 09-05-2018 08:14 PM

I should have mentioned, I will be gluing up different pieces (not turning). So far I took a hand scraper to one piece, a little wax remains. Wondering if there is a solvent that would remove the remaining?

-- Petey

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1876 posts in 579 days


#4 posted 09-05-2018 09:25 PM

wow – gluing ?
how “small” is “small” ??
I am thinking that the factory that waxes the blanks dunk them head first
into a HOT tub of wax – - – it depends on the porosity of the wood just
how deep that wax soaks into the pores and fibers.
for me – I would not glue anything to it that will experience any kind of stress.
you would have to run it through the table saw to shave off at least a 1/4” to experiment with.
again – it depends on the species of wood you have of how deep the wax goes.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1902 days


#5 posted 09-06-2018 12:04 AM

I’d dimension it first. I wouldn’t trust any of those surfaces to be glue ready.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2870 posts in 2765 days


#6 posted 09-06-2018 01:34 AM

Pete – I just made a bunch of mallets with wood from Bell Forest Products. I scraped the wax then took off just enough wood to get the faces square (~1/16”). You should also be aware the wood is probably high in moisture and will probably start showing cracks pretty quick. After getting the wax off, I put some lacquer sealer on to slow down the moisture loss and then sanded it off when it came time to glue and finish the project.

How big are the pieces and what species?

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

791 posts in 2366 days


#7 posted 09-06-2018 10:00 AM

All good advice. Earl, I bought African Black wood, bloodwood, yellow heart, Gaboon Ebony all 2”x2”x18”.

What I plan to do with it is veneer a celtic knot in the lid of a Humidor. You can see one in my project list. (can’t figure how to add that photo here.) So the lamination will be bloodwood, yellow heard, and blackwood, then resaw that in to (thin 1/8” ) strips. Then piece it together into a celtic knot. The yellow heart is 6%, but the other 3 range from 35%! to 20%.

My mistake should have bought kiln dry. I’m going to watch it and hope for the best. I scraped 95% of the wax off.

-- Petey

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2870 posts in 2765 days


#8 posted 09-06-2018 11:39 AM

Pete – I’ve recently bought and used all of those species from Bell Forest Products. The yellowheart wasn’t too bad as far as checking and cracks developing. Knowing that the other species can be troublesome should help since you can plan your work accordingly.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3517 posts in 1804 days


#9 posted 09-06-2018 12:27 PM

Assuming that you are just going to be slicing the blanks into veneer anyway, I think that I would just slice off the wax on the table or band saw and then proceed immediately to slicing your veneer. The cracking of the wet blanks will be less of an issue once it is sliced. Probably the biggest reason that wood cracks as it dries is because it shrinks in different proportions radially versus tangentially so slicing it now will mostly eliminate the internal stresses that cause the cracking. It will also dry much more quickly. Of course you may get some waviness or curling in the slices but that can usually be dealt with.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5780 posts in 2137 days


#10 posted 09-06-2018 12:47 PM

I’ve started with a little scrapping to remove the bulk of the wax then jointing two sides, then planing to dimension. I wouldn’t worry about wax on/in the jointer and planer, at most you might have a few lines that just need to be buffed but gunking up shouldn’t be a concern.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2870 posts in 2765 days


#11 posted 09-06-2018 04:52 PM

Nathan – I had some katalox that cupped about 3/8” after I cut it down to 1/2” thick, but there were other pieces off the same hunk of wood that didn’t do a thing. I think the key is to use the wood as soon as possible after the initial cut.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

791 posts in 2366 days


#12 posted 09-06-2018 05:17 PM

Nathan, I did dimension the material. I then sliced some 3/16” pieces off it. I will take your advice and glue up the strips. I have let it rest for a few hours, no movement at all. I did go with a piece of bloodwood I had in the shop, that blank from Bellforst is 35%. So overall a bit less moisture content. I hope for the best.

-- Petey

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3517 posts in 1804 days


#13 posted 09-06-2018 05:38 PM

Earl, 1/2” may still be too thick and it will depend somewhat on which direction the grain runs. Quarter sawn wood should have less of a tendency to warp for example. And of course certain woods are more likely than others to do that.

My suggestion is under the assumption that he is going to cut ~1/16th thick pieces for the inlay but even say 1/8” will be less likely to crack or warp than 1/2” for example. By cutting it that thin you reduce one of the stresses (radial or tangential) significantly relative to the other and reduce cracking. At that thickness, if he does get some warpage, heat can be used to flatten it back out, especially if it is not kiln dried.

Of course, this is all based upon my ancient memory from my wood technology course about 38 years ago (when did that happen) but I am sure that someone could verify that with a few google searches.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3517 posts in 1804 days


#14 posted 09-06-2018 05:41 PM

Good luck Petey. Lets us know how it goes. I just looked at your last project (again – I remember seeing it when you first posted) and am looking forward to seeing your next one.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

791 posts in 2366 days


#15 posted 09-08-2018 07:47 PM

Hope you can view the glue up. So far so good.

-- Petey

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com