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what m18 milwaukee nailer for 1" rough sawn barn wood on walls

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Forum topic by steffen707 posted 09-05-2018 03:46 AM 1157 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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steffen707

172 posts in 2653 days


09-05-2018 03:46 AM

I’ll be installing 1” thick rough sawn boards on a wall, i’m not sure if I should get a 15ga or 16ga nailer? Straight or angled.

I’ve read 15ga is big enough for door frames, heavy crown, but too big for most trim. I’ve heard 16ga is sometimes too small for some things. Is 15ga too big for baseboard trim?

I have a 16ga pneumatic bostitch straight nailer already; however, with all the nailing i’ll be doing I don’t want the compressor inside waking my sleeping kids at the other end of the house.

I already have lots of m18 stuff, so that’s why i’m thinking of going that route.

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.


14 replies so far

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steffen707

172 posts in 2653 days


#1 posted 09-05-2018 04:04 AM

I read this from this review https://www.toolboxbuzz.com/cordless-tools/milwaukee-16-ga-angled-cordless-finish-nailer-2742-21ct/

“One thing I immediately noticed was that the nailers firing pin does not over penetrate and leave awful looking “T” shaped scar in the wood.”

Does this mean the nails are still “T” shaped?

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.

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Desert_Woodworker

1766 posts in 1575 days


#2 posted 09-05-2018 10:51 AM

+1

-- Desert_Woodworker

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steffen707

172 posts in 2653 days


#3 posted 09-06-2018 12:39 AM

nobody?

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.

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PropmakerLA

13 posts in 370 days


#4 posted 09-06-2018 03:49 AM

I’ve only used the 18 Gauge Milwaukee a couple of times. The cordless is nice for a few shots without setting up a compressor and dragging a hose out. But If I have a lot of trim to hang I much prefer a pneumatic gun. The cordless guns are just so dam heavy they are a pain to use IMO.

When I run a compressor in the house I have a california air which is super quiet, well worth the 200.00. I’m just not a fan of the cordless guns yet.

At work we have 15g guns and I often use them. Personally I own a 23g 18g 16g and a framing gun. At this point I see no need in purchasing a 15g for my home use.

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steffen707

172 posts in 2653 days


#5 posted 09-06-2018 12:21 PM


When I run a compressor in the house I have a california air which is super quiet, well worth the 200.00. I m just not a fan of the cordless guns yet.
- PropmakerLA


Holy crap, never heard of California air compressor before. Those are QUIET. that just might work for me. What size is yours? I wonder if the tiny 1 gallon would be annoying with a nailer, or just fine. The $160 5 gallon one looks quite a bit bigger ND I don’t know where I would put it in my shop.

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5685 posts in 2081 days


#6 posted 09-06-2018 12:34 PM

Pneumatic nailers are the way to go, cheaper and last far longer. Driver blades on any quality gun made recently are profiled to match the head of the nail allowing a hole from countersinking to be no larger than the head of the nail vs. older guns which used a simple flat bottomed driver blade capable of leaving a line in the wood across the head of the nail when sinking below the surface.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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steffen707

172 posts in 2653 days


#7 posted 09-06-2018 02:07 PM

thanks guys, I ended up buying a 15ga hitachi gun with a california air compressor. I don’t do a ton of nailing, i’m just a diy-er. I got the quiet compressor and gun for about the same as the milwaukee, but its lighter, should last longer, and since i don’t do this for a living, i can fight with a hose the few times I use it.

Thanks again for the help!

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5202 posts in 4321 days


#8 posted 09-06-2018 02:55 PM

Just an aside if I may…….Maintain the gun. Keep it clean and oiled. I’ve got guns that are 20+ years old, and still doin’ fine.
Bill

-- [email protected]

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MrRon

5433 posts in 3604 days


#9 posted 09-07-2018 03:26 PM

I would hesitate using my nail gun when I had a few nails to drive until I found the California Air compressor. I now use it all the time. It really is the most quietest compressor out there and the price is not outrageous either. I wonder when other manufacturers will switch to quiet compressors. These compressors have everything; oil less pump and an aluminum tank (no rust) and light weight. I might sound like I’m pushing a product, but I have no affiliation with the company. I just believe in that product and want the world to know how good it really is. The negative thing is it is made in China. It would be nice if it were made here, but then the cost would be higher.

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MrRon

5433 posts in 3604 days


#10 posted 09-07-2018 03:36 PM

I already have lots of m18 stuff, so that s why i m thinking of going that route.

- steffen707


Did you mean 16 ga? 1” thick rough sawn boards doesn’t sound like “trim” to me. 16 ga should be adequate. There isn’t much difference between 15 ga and 16 ga. 15 ga is a round or clipped head nail and intended for framing. It is not a finishing nail. The 16 ga has a finish head and is intended for trim and moulding.

View PropmakerLA's profile

PropmakerLA

13 posts in 370 days


#11 posted 09-09-2018 04:22 PM

Congratulations on the California air purchase. Lowes sells a lightweight air hose made by Hitachi for 20.00. Its decent, but you have to lay it out before charging it up with air or its tough to get the loops out. There are nicer light weight hoses out there that I will eventually upgrade to, but obviously they cost more.

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josephf

216 posts in 2457 days


#12 posted 09-09-2018 05:56 PM



i use 15 gauge ,18 and 23 for trim .16 can be a bit thin in the 2 1/2 length ,lacking in strength for many applications .i have friends in the finish carp trade who own 16 and use them for there longer length and smaller head when strength of the nail is not as big of an issue .you also often need the bigger [15g]nail in situations or building materials that have a tendency to deflect nails . the 16g nailers are general a straight nail which is not as easy to get into tight places .

I already have lots of m18 stuff, so that s why i m thinking of going that route.

- steffen707

Did you mean 16 ga? 1” thick rough sawn boards doesn t sound like “trim” to me. 16 ga should be adequate. There isn t much difference between 15 ga and 16 ga. 15 ga is a round or clipped head nail and intended for framing. It is not a finishing nail. The 16 ga has a finish head and is intended for trim and moulding.

- MrRon


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steffen707

172 posts in 2653 days


#13 posted 09-18-2018 08:06 PM



Congratulations on the California air purchase. Lowes sells a lightweight air hose made by Hitachi for 20.00. Its decent, but you have to lay it out before charging it up with air or its tough to get the loops out. There are nicer light weight hoses out there that I will eventually upgrade to, but obviously they cost more.

- PropmakerLA


I bought a flexzilla air hose off amazon. Haven’t used it yet, but i love their garden hoses.

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.

View steffen707's profile

steffen707

172 posts in 2653 days


#14 posted 09-18-2018 08:08 PM


i use 15 gauge ,18 and 23 for trim .16 can be a bit thin in the 2 1/2 length ,lacking in strength for many applications .i have friends in the finish carp trade who own 16 and use them for there longer length and smaller head when strength of the nail is not as big of an issue .you also often need the bigger [15g]nail in situations or building materials that have a tendency to deflect nails . the 16g nailers are general a straight nail which is not as easy to get into tight places .

I already have lots of m18 stuff, so that s why i m thinking of going that route.

- steffen707

Did you mean 16 ga? 1” thick rough sawn boards doesn t sound like “trim” to me. 16 ga should be adequate. There isn t much difference between 15 ga and 16 ga. 15 ga is a round or clipped head nail and intended for framing. It is not a finishing nail. The 16 ga has a finish head and is intended for trim and moulding.

- MrRon

- josephf


Yeah i figured the 1” rough sawn boards would need a little more holding power of the 15ga, than the 16ga trim nailer.

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.

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