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Forum topic by joea99 posted 09-04-2018 12:49 AM 706 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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joea99

21 posts in 330 days


09-04-2018 12:49 AM

I am more of a “hacker” than a woodworker but I do OK after a fashion. I can lead off with, I do have access to an inherited large 8” older jointer that I have not run in over 20 years. Pretty sure it will work once I clean it up.

But, since that is a lot of work, I thought I would try some simpler things first. Or so I thought.

All I am trying to do is joint a few short slabs of red oak so I can biscuit them. I need a wider piece than I have now and since I have some laying around . . .

Anyway no matter what I try, table saw tricks, router tricks (got a cheapo router table), I cannot avoid ending up with a slight bow or curve along the joint. Now it is slight, and I can close it up with a good twist on the bar clamps, but, darn it, I see these guys on you tube claiming and allegedly showing really clean jointing using essentially what I am doing.

I really do want to avoid having to clean up that old jointer eating spider webs, etc, and ending up with a bowed board anyway. At least that’s what I tell myself.

suggestions?


12 replies so far

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

245 posts in 1197 days


#1 posted 09-04-2018 01:02 AM

Clean the Jointer, sharpen the knives, check table alignment.
A well set up Jointer will work fine.
What brand of Jointer?

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1908 days


#2 posted 09-04-2018 01:02 AM

What you are accidentally doing is making a spring or sprung joint. One of those. Some do it on purpose.

I wouldn’t worry too much if you know it’ll close up but I’d go ahead and start cleaning that jointer up. I couldn’t do with out one.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View HammerSmith's profile

HammerSmith

292 posts in 506 days


#3 posted 09-04-2018 01:12 AM

As long as you can get a square edge on the board, a slight (gentle) bow is ok. As long as it’s not wavy.

I’ve even seen people who do that on purpose. They leave the gap in the center, and clamp it up. I never tried that technique myself, but it makes a lot of sense to me… “less clamps needed”...

But, with that said, I still think it might be worthwhile to get the old planer dialed in! I wish I still had a planer… But I do my planing at the tablesaw nowadays… With a good blade and a stabilizer, the cut is good enough to go straight to glue-up… (maybe just a slight touch with 220 paper on a block to clean it up a little.)

-- ~Jim

View HammerSmith's profile

HammerSmith

292 posts in 506 days


#4 posted 09-04-2018 01:15 AM



What you are accidentally doing is making a spring or sprung joint. One of those. Some do it on purpose.

I wouldn’t worry too much if you know it’ll close up but I’d go ahead and start cleaning that jointer up. I couldn’t do with out one.

- TheFridge

Lol. Wow Fridge, you beat me to it!

but yeah, I’ll second that!

-- ~Jim

View joea99's profile

joea99

21 posts in 330 days


#5 posted 09-04-2018 01:32 AM



Clean the Jointer, sharpen the knives, check table alignment.
A well set up Jointer will work fine.
What brand of Jointer?

- Richard Lee

Thanks to all that replied. No idea what model of jointer it is as the name plate has gone missing. The tables are plate steel. The motor is a 110/220 “B-line”. Humongous thing. Belonged to my grand uncle along with a Walker Turner table saw that is also collecting spider webs. I’ll see if I can attach a picture or two of the jointer.

View HammerSmith's profile

HammerSmith

292 posts in 506 days


#6 posted 09-04-2018 01:37 AM

That jointer is beautiful!

If the tables are true, I would say it’s definitely worth taking a weekend to get it all dialed in!

-- ~Jim

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2220 days


#7 posted 09-04-2018 02:12 AM

Looks like the tables on that jointer go on forever.
If they are flat and coplane that will make a first class jointer.
Good luck

-- Aj

View joea99's profile

joea99

21 posts in 330 days


#8 posted 09-04-2018 02:45 AM



Looks like the tables on that jointer go on forever.
If they are flat and coplane that will make a first class jointer.
Good luck

- Aj2

They are long, but it’s mostly the angle. The barn is pretty well overstuffed making it hard to get around in there. But, it must be done.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

528 posts in 601 days


#9 posted 09-04-2018 04:07 AM

I say clean the jointer up and use it for this job. Then sell it and buy something you like with the money.

I glue up panels everyday without a jointer. Have your lumber suplier straight line rip it and glueing up your panels are a snap.

Do I wish I had a good jointer? Meh, not on my top 10 wants.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11638 posts in 3851 days


#10 posted 09-04-2018 12:08 PM

That’s not a jointer. That’s an aircraft carrier!

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

1617 posts in 1830 days


#11 posted 09-04-2018 12:48 PM

Definitely spend some time cleaning that up, i think anyone saying otherwise hasn’t had one sitting there ready to roll. Pretty much everything goes across my jointer, no sense fussing with imperfect edges!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3570 posts in 1810 days


#12 posted 09-04-2018 01:04 PM

+1 on getting that jointer into a usable state.

When you say “table saw tricks” did you make a jointing sled? Since you describe the slabs as short, you should be able to clamp the slabs to a sled that will allow you to get a truly straight edge on them them. A quick google search on using your table saw as a jointer will probably show several ideas for how to do that if you are not familiar (and not what you did).

Also note that it is not uncommon for a newly milled board to move, bow for example, after the first pass of milling, especially if the humidity is different than the normal humidity the boards were stored in. A common practice when milling boards is to make an initial pass, a little wider/thicker than you need, wait a few days for the wood to move and then make one more pass to final dimensions.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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