LumberJocks

Getting right thickness wood

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by bgilb posted 09-03-2018 08:27 PM 826 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View bgilb's profile

bgilb

101 posts in 3479 days


09-03-2018 08:27 PM

If I buy regular poplar from the big box store it’s about 3/4 thick. But either bowed, cupped or twisted so needs to be squared up. The problem is I need 3/4” thick. After squaring up it’s going to be less than 3/4” thick. What do I do?


15 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5453 posts in 2771 days


#1 posted 09-03-2018 08:36 PM

Get it from a hard wood supplier, it should be at least 13/16” or 7/8” if rough.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8674 posts in 2997 days


#2 posted 09-03-2018 08:38 PM

http://www.houstonhardwoods.com/lumber.php

http://dakotahardwoods.com/products_hardwood_lumber.html

Find a lumberyard about town or maybe get some 5/4 or 4/4 rough stock and mill your own.

View HammerSmith's profile

HammerSmith

288 posts in 504 days


#3 posted 09-03-2018 09:14 PM



If I buy regular poplar from the big box store it s about 3/4 thick. But either bowed, cupped or twisted so needs to be squared up. The problem is I need 3/4” thick. After squaring up it s going to be less than 3/4” thick. What do I do?

- bgilb

Poplar is not a very stable wood in the first place. Even if you get a straight piece, it probably won’t stay that way unless it’s fastened to something.

Of course, each stick is unique. Some will twist more than others. Quarter sawn pieces are much less likely to cup and twist.

What are you making?

-- ~Jim

View bgilb's profile

bgilb

101 posts in 3479 days


#4 posted 09-03-2018 09:25 PM

It would be for face frames.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

579 posts in 323 days


#5 posted 09-03-2018 09:26 PM

I have purchased poplar boards at our local big box store with no problems of warp, twist, or cupping. You may have to look thru their stock to find what you want.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1906 days


#6 posted 09-03-2018 11:32 PM

Personally. I don’t worry too much about it. Nailing and gluing to the carcass will fix it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View 9x9's profile

9x9

99 posts in 1660 days


#7 posted 09-03-2018 11:55 PM

go through the stack untill find something doable. move on to another store if have to.

-- Youngsville, LA

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

206 posts in 379 days


#8 posted 09-04-2018 12:17 AM


Get it from a hard wood supplier, it should be at least 13/16” or 7/8” if rough.

- bondogaposis

If your yard is selling you rough stock under 1” you are getting over charged.

Rough 4/4 should be 1 to 1&1/16 dry.

To the op, the big box stores do not carry solid hard wood you actually want to use. Find a local HW dealer and buy from them.

As an example home depot is over $5/bd ft for poplar (s4s) my local yard has rough 4/4 for $2.05. The yard a bit farther away has s2s r1e at 7/8” for $2.35/bdft or s4s at 3/4” for $2.70

This stack of 4/4 poplar finished out at 1 inch after planning. It never saw a jointer (moulding blanks) it’s flat, and stayed that way. Having a yard that knows how to run a kiln helps.

I’d throw out face frame Stock that didn’t behave.

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

1607 posts in 1828 days


#9 posted 09-04-2018 12:21 AM

As has been said, sort of… It’ll depend what you’re doing. If you need flat stock you need to develop a relationship with a local hardwood supplier! If not you’ll just have to spend some time digging through the stacks at the big box store.

View HammerSmith's profile

HammerSmith

288 posts in 504 days


#10 posted 09-04-2018 12:51 AM


It would be for face frames.

- bgilb

I think it’ll be fine then. Poplar isn’t too strong, so attaching it to a plywood box with stabilize it nicely.

If the pieces you get are all warped and hard to mill, just cut it into shorter pieces before you go to the table saw.

I agree with the things said above, Poplar is ok for many things, and the price is right!

But I’ve seen the way Poplar likes to twist and warp, even when it’s laying flat in a dry place… It seems to me that Poplar has to be held in place.

-- ~Jim

View HammerSmith's profile

HammerSmith

288 posts in 504 days


#11 posted 09-04-2018 12:56 AM



Personally. I don’t worry too much about it. Nailing and gluing to the carcass will fix it.

- TheFridge

Yup. I’ll second that..

-- ~Jim

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1906 days


#12 posted 09-04-2018 12:58 AM

Within reason of course.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

655 posts in 1168 days


#13 posted 09-04-2018 02:01 AM

I buy wood in the rough from a hardwoods supplier and mill it to 3/4 inch. Running it through my planer (DW 735) let’s me get all boards to the exact same thickness. If i buy from HD or Lowe’s I can mill it all to the same thickness, but it won’t be 3/4 inch.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

528 posts in 599 days


#14 posted 09-04-2018 04:30 AM

If its just for face frames, find a decent supplier(generally not home depot or menards, but not always). Google wholesale lumber or S4S lumber. Something will pop up in your area.

Honestly the best and easiest supplier for 1.5” poplar for me is Menards. And this is coming from a company that buys at least 1000$ board foot per month. The problem is that they only have certain sizes.

Good lumber yards will give you what ever you want as long as you treat them right. With lumber yards, money talks. Treat them right, they will return the favor.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1398 posts in 1236 days


#15 posted 09-05-2018 03:27 AM

I have found poplar to be extremely stable if it is used in a manner that takes into account changes in dimension with humidity – just like any other species. In 40 years of woodworking, this is the first time I have heard anyone talk about stability problems with poplar. Of course it is possible to cause any species to warp if you try hard enough.

If I buy regular poplar from the big box store it s about 3/4 thick. But either bowed, cupped or twisted so needs to be squared up. The problem is I need 3/4” thick. After squaring up it s going to be less than 3/4” thick. What do I do?

- bgilb

Poplar is not a very stable wood in the first place. Even if you get a straight piece, it probably won t stay that way unless it s fastened to something.

Of course, each stick is unique. Some will twist more than others. Quarter sawn pieces are much less likely to cup and twist.

What are you making?

- HammerSmith


Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com