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Resawing Bandsaw Infeed support

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Forum topic by bmerrill posted 08-30-2018 05:00 PM 489 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bmerrill

52 posts in 494 days


08-30-2018 05:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw resaw fence infeed question

Have about 300 bft of 1” x 4-10”w x 8-15’ long old barn wood boards to resaw.
Have a tall beefy fence on the left side of the blade, but looking for some type of infeed support on the right side of the blade. Saw a short YouTube video of a person resawing long boards with a spring loaded roller bead on the right side of the blade and another idea of using fixed casters mounted to a board, then to the table.

Looking for some pictures or other ideas.

-- "Do. Or do not. There is no try". Yoda


8 replies so far

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Rich

4569 posts in 1010 days


#1 posted 08-30-2018 05:30 PM

I use roller stands.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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LittleShaver

554 posts in 1040 days


#2 posted 08-30-2018 06:19 PM

Roller stands too

-- Sawdust Maker

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DBDesigns

220 posts in 418 days


#3 posted 08-30-2018 06:27 PM

Roller stands from Harbor Freight because they are cheap and you can scrimp here without worrying too much about quality since they just kinda stands there and look dumb…you know just like my nephew. Oh wait, did I say that out loud?

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

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Rich

4569 posts in 1010 days


#4 posted 08-30-2018 06:28 PM

If you’re working alone, a two-tier feather board will help keep the board flush to the fence. Having it drift away at the top or bottom during the cut is a recipe for disaster.

Several companies make them, I use MagSwitch products.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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bmerrill

52 posts in 494 days


#5 posted 08-30-2018 07:35 PM

A little clarification.
Have in-feed and out-feed support for the material.
Looking for a something better to help support the material on the left side of the blade.
As suggested above, using a double stack feather board is an option which I do own the MagSwitch version, but I’m concerned it will not be amble to maintain such long material against the fence. Looking for something more robust, similar to what is in this video.
https://youtu.be/VB0FRrCu4jM

-- "Do. Or do not. There is no try". Yoda

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Rich

4569 posts in 1010 days


#6 posted 08-30-2018 07:46 PM

That’s quite a system. Way beyond my needs, but you could probably do a home brew using skateboard wheels.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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BattleRidge

111 posts in 637 days


#7 posted 08-30-2018 07:48 PM

I have a Milescraft DT Tandem featherboard for my Laguna 18BX bandsaw and it may work for your application. With the wider boards, using a push block on the upper part of the board could help maintain more secure contact to the upper portion of the bandsaw fence.

I am curious what saw and blade you will be using and what you will be using the boards for once they are resawn (joining and planing may result in a fairly thin board if you will be doing that also)?

It might be worthwhile to consider the end product and if you will need a 15’ section of finished product. Shortening the length to something more manageable could make the process easier if you don’t need an 8-15’ long board.

I have an old one-room schoolhouse with an addition that was built for farm critters and will be dismantling the building to reclaim the wood (much of which is a full 8/4 thick, along with thinner boards used as siding. Some of the wood is relatively straight and true, though other pieces can have some deflection in various directions. While each piece will be treated individually in regard to how it may best be used, I am considering jointing some of the boards, running the flat side along the bandsaw fence while resawing, then further jointing / planing as needed. With a variety of the boards, I plan to use the more natural look of the more rough sawn lumber and likewise it won’t be processed as much.

I am interested in your thoughts and ideas and please don’t hesitate to share your insight and experiences along the way.

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/milescraft-d-t-tandem-featherboard

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bmerrill

52 posts in 494 days


#8 posted 08-30-2018 08:50 PM

The old barn wood has 2 usable faces. Typically its just one face.
Being 1” thick, resawing would yield double the surface area.
The boards would be first surfaced on one edge and then ripped on the SawStop PCS table saw. Next a trip through the 14” Rikon bandsaw and then through the Dewalt 735 planer to achieve a uniform thickness of about 3/8” (to be determined).

The wood will be used to completely cover a 24’x9’ wall and a portion (16×9) of an adjoining wall in the attached 2 car garage currently undergoing a remodel of sorts. The garage will become a shared space of a more formal woodworking shop, and for parking of my wife’s car. I cook competition BBQ, so there is a fridge, freezer and big sink in this same space as well. The remaining walls will be either painted with a finish coat or covered with corrugated metal panels. The garage walls and 18’ overhead door are insulated.

Link to the floor plan. https://www.dropbox.com/s/kedeta3eb61ird0/Garage%20Layout.pdf?dl=0

Phase 1 of the project is complete being the electrical upgrade going from 1 circuit to 6 new 120V circuits and three 220v circuits. This involved cutting out sheet rock, drilling through studs, pulling wires from the panel box through the crawl space, installing of outlet boxes, adding 4 locations for goose-neck wall mounted lights, space to mount a TV, and irrigation controller. The sheet rock was repaired, and last weekend the walls and ceiling were all sprayed with primed and the ceiling again sprayed with the finish coat. Floor and the brick foundation walls were pressure washed.

Phase 2 is painting the other walls, installing 2 overhead storage racks above the garage door, hang the dust filter system, install overhead compressed air reel, and install the mini-split HVAC. More or less this phase is to decluter the space.

Phase 3 is to install prep and install the barnwood and corrugated metal.

Phase 4 is construction of 30 feet of counter tops with miter saw station, start building the rolling workbench/assembly tables doubling as the in-feed and out feed tables. The table saw, and the assembly tables will be stored under the counter tops when the floor space is needed for other functions.

-- "Do. Or do not. There is no try". Yoda

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