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Patching 1/8" gap with wood filler?

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Forum topic by boobird posted 08-30-2018 12:53 AM 1030 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boobird

12 posts in 332 days


08-30-2018 12:53 AM

My first attempt at making a shaker cabinet door…

Took a 1/2” plywood panel and rabbeted 3/8” so that it will slide in a groove. But it’s not a perfect fit.

There is a 1/8” gap between the plywood and the stile piece.

Can i patch this long 1/8” gap with some type of filler? What would be the most durable material to use? Please also consider the ease of use, # of coats required, sandability, hardness etc

Readypatch?
Wood filler?
Bondo?
Elmer’s wood filler
Durham’s

From.bobvila.com

My cabinet door as seen from the back

I will be priming and painting white.


20 replies so far

View rickinbeachcrest's profile

rickinbeachcrest

14 posts in 1898 days


#1 posted 08-30-2018 01:41 AM

IMHO, Wood putty or any of its ilk, have no business in fine woodworking.

I would take a 45 deg router bit and run it along all 4 edges and make it look like you did this on purpose.

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patron

13649 posts in 3757 days


#2 posted 08-30-2018 02:01 AM

i’ve used bondo for various needs

solid filler
good glue too

tape the back if the fix is all the way thru
put some from the back after the main has hardened
if needed
sand and repeat till it is nice and smooth

more hardener
is kicks faster

thats how the auto body shops do it
maybe some cream after for any slight imperfections
to final smooth
paint

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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sras

5108 posts in 3545 days


#3 posted 08-30-2018 03:15 AM

Fill with a thin strip of the same wood. The gap will disappear.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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TravisH

675 posts in 2351 days


#4 posted 08-30-2018 11:14 AM

Durham’s likely your best option if going fill route with a “paste” type product.

I have used it to patch a board outdoors that our dog decided was a good thing to chew on years ago. No issues to this date and it has been exposed to -16 to 100 degree temperatures, rain, and sun for about 10 years now. The surface was much rougher to begin with however. It also was covered with a good exterior paint.

I would likely however not fill as see it hard that you won’t get small hairline cracks in time on a door that will telegraph the old design. Not for sure about tools you have available but a router and sled set up and you could just make a square recessed shaker door look rather easy.

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ArtMann

1396 posts in 1232 days


#5 posted 08-30-2018 03:33 PM

You may have problems with hard material cracking, separating and even coming out due to differential expansion between plywood and solid wood. I know it sounds wrong but I would use painters caulk because it is flexible and will move with the material throughout the year. You have that freedon since you are painting.

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boobird

12 posts in 332 days


#6 posted 08-30-2018 03:38 PM

Thanks for the replies.

This is the first time i’ve ever used a table saw, router, etc.

When I was using the router table + tongue/groove bit, I had trouble keeping it flush against the fence.

When using a router table, is it safe to use the fence AND a miter gauge? I found that the miter gauge kept the rail piece perpendicular to the bit (when creating the tongue). without the miter gauge pushing along the rail, the piece kind of dipped into the bit and took a chunk out.

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boobird

12 posts in 332 days


#7 posted 08-30-2018 03:43 PM

I obviously didn’t measure the center plywood panel correctly! I didn’t visualize that the back panel would sit directly flush with the back rail/stiles.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3434 posts in 1897 days


#8 posted 08-30-2018 03:57 PM

Bondo.

Or live with a defect on the back of a door…............... :-)


When I was using the router table + tongue/groove bit, I had trouble keeping it flush against the fence.

When using a router table, is it safe to use the fence AND a miter gauge? I found that the miter gauge kept the rail piece perpendicular to the bit (when creating the tongue). without the miter gauge pushing along the rail, the piece kind of dipped into the bit and took a chunk out.

Couple things: 1. Use a push block rather than a miter gauge on the rail ends. I screw one of those cheap plastic ones a piece of wood that serves also as a backer to prevent tear out. Be sure the piece of wood is a perfect 90° so it holds the rail ends square to bit.

2. Feather boards help guide the more precisely through the bit.

3. An insert in your fence that is cut out to match the router bit. This keeps the gaps to a minimum to the wood engages the guide bearing right away.

- boobird

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5313 posts in 2725 days


#9 posted 08-30-2018 04:29 PM

If you are talking about a gap on the back of the door where the panel goes slides into the groves of the styles and rails.

Since it looks like your using plywood panels you won’t any appreciable movement. I would secure the panel with a couple of short pin nails from the back side, then Id run a bead of flexible paintable caulk around the door.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Rich's profile

Rich

4548 posts in 1005 days


#10 posted 08-30-2018 04:31 PM


When using a router table, is it safe to use the fence AND a miter gauge? I found that the miter gauge kept the rail piece perpendicular to the bit (when creating the tongue). without the miter gauge pushing along the rail, the piece kind of dipped into the bit and took a chunk out.

- boobird

Buy or build a coping sled. I have a small one I use for coping rail ends on cabinet doors and a really large one I use for residential door rails, where the kick rail is 9”-plus.

Here’s the large one. It rides in the miter slots of the table saw (the router is in an extension wing):

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5313 posts in 2725 days


#11 posted 08-30-2018 04:38 PM



IMHO, Wood putty or any of its ilk, have no business in fine woodworking.

I would take a 45 deg router bit and run it along all 4 edges and make it look like you did this on purpose.

- rickinbeachcrest


No harm, no foul in using fillers in/on painted projects. The professions do it all the time.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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boobird

12 posts in 332 days


#12 posted 08-30-2018 04:47 PM

Is it actually possible to have perfectly smooth painters caulk? It seems too viscous and impossible to sand down? Unless you’re not talking about alex caulk..?

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5313 posts in 2725 days


#13 posted 08-30-2018 04:56 PM



Is it actually possible to have perfectly smooth painters caulk? It seems too viscous and impossible to sand down? Unless you re not talking about alex caulk..?

- boobird


https://youtu.be/siDYA3WdO8M

https://youtu.be/OmMlDMCOICk

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=caulking+cabinets+before+painting+

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23150 posts in 3099 days


#14 posted 08-30-2018 05:01 PM

Just use the same thing painters do with caulk…..a wet finger. Nothing complicated.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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boobird

12 posts in 332 days


#15 posted 08-30-2018 05:03 PM

My concern with caulk would be requiring some kind of backer rod, since the gap is rather large.

And also, it may not be perfectly flat because its not sandable?

showing 1 through 15 of 20 replies

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