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Trouble with Dewalt 18 volt batteries.

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Forum topic by BMorrow posted 08-28-2018 02:15 PM 683 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BMorrow

8 posts in 483 days


08-28-2018 02:15 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dewalt batteries battery problem battery not charging

I have some batteries that are several years old that are no longer taking a charge so I picked up a two-pack at Home Depot. The new batteries do not seem to be holding a charge, either. They take just enough charge to drill 5-10 pilot holes in wood or drive 10-20 sheet rock screws.

I have three chargers (including my Jobsite radio) and both new batteries behave the same regardless of the charger used. The charger starts blinking the slow blink when I plug them in and they are blinking the fast blink when I take them off the next morning.

I did not turn up any other reports of such behavior with a google search. Has any of you experienced or heard of this problem?

Bill Morrow


12 replies so far

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GR8HUNTER

6693 posts in 1274 days


#1 posted 08-28-2018 02:28 PM

Problems are indicated by the red light flash-
ing at a fast rate. If this occurs, re-insert battery pack into the charg-
er. If the problem persists, try a different battery pack to determine if
the charger is OK. If the new pack charges correctly, then the original
pack is defective and should be returned to a service center or other
collection site for recycling. If the new battery pack elicits the same trouble indication as the original, have the charger tested at an authorized service center. :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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WoodenDreams

830 posts in 473 days


#2 posted 08-28-2018 02:37 PM

You don’t know how long the batteries have been on the shelf at the store. Not as many carpenters or woodwrkers are using the 18 volt DeWalt any more since they replaced it with the 20 volt DeWalt tools, so they stay on the store shelves longer. I have the same problem when I replaced my 14 volt B&B. DeWalt did make a 18 to 20 volt adapter, but I don’t know how well it does. Interstate Stores does sell and rebuilt the portable tool batteries.

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BMorrow

8 posts in 483 days


#3 posted 08-30-2018 03:11 PM

Well, in light of the responses, I can only theorize that the new batteries are bad. I will return them for a refund. Thanks for the help.

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

1981 posts in 1969 days


#4 posted 08-30-2018 03:15 PM

this reminds me I have 2 2-packs I haven’t opened yet, I better open them and keep them rotated on the charger for maintenance

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BMorrow

8 posts in 483 days


#5 posted 08-30-2018 03:17 PM

One last possibility. I have read reports of people “zapping” batteries with momentary high voltage to return them to life. Any possibility that may help in this situation?

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CaptainKlutz

2038 posts in 2056 days


#6 posted 08-30-2018 03:52 PM

+1 Blinking lights after many hours of charging indicates a problem exists somewhere. Unplug charger, remove pack, and try again? Have experienced the ‘old’ battery issue from BORG purchase as well, so need to be careful about date codes.

Not to veer off topic, but FWIW:
I stopped buying OEM Dewalt 18V batteries 5-7 years ago. Can buy clones on fleabay for about 50-60% of retail sale prices of OEM units. The high volume sellers ship fresh batteries, and they last just as long as OEM, roughly 2-4 years.

Dewalt also makes a DCA2203 conversion kit for older tools.

I broke down and bought conversion adapter, and for casual tool user the 20v pack is much more user friendly. New packs have fraction of old style discharge rate, and can store packs for months and still have full charge. They 20v also have a power indicator, which removes some guess work before a job.
Best price on OEM conversion kit usually pops up during Black Friday/Holiday sales. You can find inexpensive clone conversion adapters, grey market OEM chargers, and clones of 20v packs on fleabay as well. Have used 2 of 20v clone packs for last 2+ years and they are still going strong. Best part is they cost about half of OEM, or put another way – you can buy 4AH pack for cost of 2AH version. Best part of new 20v high capacity packs is when working on long hard jobs. The 18v packs are only 2.4AH, and you can buy 4-6AH 20V packs which allow longer run time between charges for about same weight.

Best Luck!

And please recycle old battery packs!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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BMorrow

8 posts in 483 days


#7 posted 08-30-2018 05:08 PM

I have resisted upgrading to 20v because I have invested in a shop full of 18v tools.

Am I correct in my assumption that 20v batteries cannot be used with 18v tools?

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a1Jim

117786 posts in 4139 days


#8 posted 08-30-2018 06:07 PM

I think I’ve seen an adapter somewhere, but I’m not sure.

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a1Jim

117786 posts in 4139 days


#9 posted 08-30-2018 06:08 PM

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MrRon

5783 posts in 3805 days


#10 posted 08-30-2018 06:36 PM

I have read reports that the adapters were difficult to remove from the tool and the Li-Ion batteries didn’t have a long run time over the 18 volt batteries.

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CaptainKlutz

2038 posts in 2056 days


#11 posted 08-30-2018 08:20 PM



Am I correct in my assumption that 20v batteries cannot be used with 18v tools?
- BMorrow

NO. 20v batteries using the adapter work like normal.


I have read reports that the adapters were difficult to remove from the tool and the Li-Ion batteries didn t have a long run time over the 18 volt batteries.

- MrRon

Yes sometimes I wish they could be easier to remove. :(
I have 2 adapters. One OEM, and one clone version from fleabay. The clone one is fairly easy to remove, and the OEM can be real pain depending on tool. My biggest issue is the size of the buttons on adapter design. They are smaller than normal battery unlock button, and recessed under the top of tool case on some larger tools; which makes it hard for my fat fingers to press and get adapter released. Until I picked up clone adapter, I thought Delta intended them to be hard to remove?

As far as battery life, the 2AH 20v pack supplied as default with low end tool combo’s does have less capacity than 2.4AH 18v pack, and duration comparison depends on tool type. Circular saw or reciprocating tools eat power, and 0.4Ah difference is noticeable. On drill/driver, they seem to last about same length unless installing long deck screws in PT lumber. With low cost of 20v 4AH packs, decided it was silly to buy any 2AH 20v batteries once I released they were had less capacity than 18v battery. The 4AH 20v last much longer than 2.4 AH 18v in all my Dewalt tools. The big 6AH battery last longer than I do on some projects. :)

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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BMorrow

8 posts in 483 days


#12 posted 08-31-2018 04:24 PM

CaptainKlutz said:

“With low cost of 20v 4AH packs, decided it was silly to buy any 2AH 20v batteries once I released they were had less capacity than 18v battery. The 4AH 20v last much longer than 2.4 AH 18v in all my Dewalt tools.”

Great advice. Thanks.

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