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Forum topic by skidiot posted 08-25-2018 01:40 AM 765 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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skidiot

85 posts in 4067 days


08-25-2018 01:40 AM

Hi,
I have a 6” Jet jointer with the helical head. I have had it for many years. I never have had any problems, it has been a wonderful machine. Just today I am having problems. It wont cut flat. The front of the board cuts deeper than the rear. After 3 passes I have a wedge shaped piece. i have to rotate the board 180 degrees on each pass to keep it even.. This causes a problem with cutting against the grain. Whats gone wrong?
Thanks
Skidiot

-- skidiot northern illinois


19 replies so far

View Steve's profile

Steve

1360 posts in 1005 days


#1 posted 08-25-2018 03:21 AM

Sounds like the tables aren’t level. Infeed lower than out feed.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2220 days


#2 posted 08-25-2018 03:25 AM

This is something that happens when the outfeed is too high we’re taking a tiny amount .002 or more.
If you have a dial indicator with a magnetic base set it on the infeed and lower the out feed keeping track with dial indicator.
Or you could just lower the outfeed till there’s snipe on the trailing end then raise it till that’s gone.
Did you have a visitor in your shop? When my grandson vistits he always goes for the hand wheels on my jointer.
Or maybe your insets have worn down enough to make a difference in that particular wood.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2731 days


#3 posted 08-25-2018 04:49 AM

Read Tapering (Long Axis of board) I think that’s what you are saying the problem is.

http://www.newwoodworker.com/jntrprobfxs.html

Pretty much what Aj is saying.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2730 posts in 1645 days


#4 posted 08-25-2018 02:19 PM

Yep, table heights are off (most likely the out feed table)

View skidiot's profile

skidiot

85 posts in 4067 days


#5 posted 08-25-2018 03:21 PM

I dont understand. The infeed is always lower than the out feed, thats how it works? The infeed is raised and lowered to get your different thickness of cut. I have never touched the adjustment for the outfeed.

-- skidiot northern illinois

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2731 days


#6 posted 08-25-2018 03:28 PM



I dont understand. The infeed is always lower than the out feed, thats how it works? The infeed is raised and lowered to get your different thickness of cut. I have never touched the adjustment for the outfeed.

- skidiot

What they are saying is the out feed table may be a tad higher than the knives. Not the in feed table.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2220 days


#7 posted 08-25-2018 03:40 PM

We always suggest the easiest or simplest option first. You don’t want to mess with the table alignment. Make that your absolute last resort.
If the knifes are slightly lower then the outfeed table.The wood bumps into the lip of the outfeed table and lifts it up and out of the cut.
I hope this clears it up for you
Good luck

-- Aj

View KTNC's profile

KTNC

96 posts in 678 days


#8 posted 08-26-2018 03:46 AM

What a coincidence. Just a few days ago, I was having the same problem with my jointer. It was cutting more at the beginning and nothing at the end – just like skidiot reported. I thought it was because my outfeed was too high compared to the knives so I checked and it all looked just right. I tried another board and same thing. I decided to go ahead and lower the outfeed table and after that it worked. So, like Aj2 said, try lowering the outfeed.

What I’ve also found, is if I get the outfeed too low, then I get boards whit a low spot in the middle. If you put one against a straight edge it will touch on the ends but leave a gap in the middle.

Good Luck.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

626 posts in 333 days


#9 posted 08-26-2018 07:35 AM

I’ve experienced both, the cut wedging and low spot in the middle. What is the length of the in-feed or out-feed table ? if the board is much longer than the in-feed or out-feed table, the weight of the board hanging off the jointer may lift somewhat from the cutting knives and you don’t realize it. or pushing down too hard may not give a straight edge cut on a board with a warp in it….... If either happens, I change the belt on my 6”x80” Edge Sander from 150 grit to 80 Grit, and use my Edge Sander to get my straight edge, then change back to 150 grit to smooth off the roughness, and maintain a straight edge for gluing or table saw use.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

438 posts in 1082 days


#10 posted 08-26-2018 05:00 PM

You do realize that you can only joint one edge and one face? If you try to joint both edges or both faces then you end up with a wedge. The proper way to get two square edges and two square faces is to joint one face, then one edge. Then you run that face down running it through the planer, and repeat the same procedure for the edge. The planer makes the opposite edge or face (the unjointed face or edge) parrelell to the jointer face or edge.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1908 days


#11 posted 08-26-2018 05:03 PM

I have this happen too at times for some reason or another but the surface is flat so I don’t bother.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2220 days


#12 posted 08-26-2018 06:38 PM

I always hope for a tight gap free joint on the edges.
But if there’s a gap in the middle that can be closed with hand pressure and the ends are good I’m still happy.

-- Aj

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2731 days


#13 posted 08-26-2018 06:43 PM


I always hope for a tight gap free joint on the edges.
But if there’s a gap in the middle that can be closed with hand pressure and the ends are good I’m still happy.

- Aj2

Often called a “sprung joint”. Which I don’t use. I like my jointer set for making straight cuts.

https://www.finewoodworking.com/2010/04/26/spring-joints-an-edge-glue-ups-best-friend

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View skidiot's profile

skidiot

85 posts in 4067 days


#14 posted 08-27-2018 04:42 AM

I tried lowering the outfeed by just a teensy bit. This seems to have made the issue worse. Now the rear end of the board dont touch the blades. The board is shorter than the tables. I checked the outfeed level before I lowered it. A straight edge was just ever so touching the blades as I rotated the head. Just like I have always heard. If I were to raise the outfeed it would be higher than the blades. I know that is wrong. I put a straight edge across both tables, and they seem to be coplanar. As I push the board through when I get to about the middle of the board it feels like the front end is not touching the table. Then it rocks down in the front and the rear end comes off of the infeed table. It used to work so nicely. It was my favorite machine. Right now it is useless. Please help me.
Thank you all.

-- skidiot northern illinois

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2731 days


#15 posted 08-27-2018 05:23 AM


I tried lowering the outfeed by just a teeny bit. This seems to have made the issue worse. Now the rear end of the board dont touch the blades. The board is shorter than the tables. I checked the outfeed level before I lowered it. A straight edge was just ever so touching the blades as I rotated the head. Just like I have always heard. If I were to raise the outfeed it would be higher than the blades. I know that is wrong. I put a straight edge across both tables, and they seem to be coplanar. As I push the board through when I get to about the middle of the board it feels like the front end is not touching the table. Then it rocks down in the front and the rear end comes off of the infeed table. It used to work so nicely. It was my favorite machine. Right now it is useless. Please help me.
Thank you all.

- skidiot

Just hang in there and have patience and we will all figure this out together. You say you lowered it a teeny bit. But where are the knives in relation to the table. If you lowered the table too much then normally that would cause snipe on the end of the board. Something else, my jointer will sometimes start acting all weird with hard to diagnose problems and it turns out to be dull knives. I change or sharpen them and all is good. How long you been using the same cutting edges? Are your cutters sharp?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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