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Forum topic by LDO2802 posted 08-23-2018 08:30 PM 858 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LDO2802

167 posts in 846 days


08-23-2018 08:30 PM

Opinion time gentlemen (for those skilled in marquetry). What is the best book on the subject?


6 replies so far

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shipwright

8319 posts in 3214 days


#1 posted 08-24-2018 12:06 AM

That would depend on the kind of marquetry you want to do.
Knife cut?
Double bevel scroll saw?
Classic English?
Classic French?

My preferred style is classic French. The best books on the subject are all by Pierre Ramond.
-Marquetry
-Masterpieces of Marquetry (three book set)
- Andre Charles Boulle (so far only in French)

If you are into double bevel style with scrollsaw look for A Marquetry Odessey by Silas Kopf

For classic English marquetry try Jack Metcalf
-Chippendale’s Classic Marquetry Revealed
-The Classic Marquetry Course

Someone will chip in with knife method books. Knife cutting isn’t my thing but fellow LJ Dusan Rakic is a master.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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LDO2802

167 posts in 846 days


#2 posted 08-27-2018 09:52 PM

I am interested in the period pieces from the empire (classical) period? That is what I am looking into doing. The French style seems to be a big to ‘busy’ for me from what I have seen.

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shipwright

8319 posts in 3214 days


#3 posted 08-28-2018 02:09 AM

Classic French and English styles of cutting as well as more modern power tool oriented styles are all applicable to any furniture style. What varies most is the tools and techniques.
I find the chevalet gives me the best quality of cut, certainly far better than I can achieve with a scroll saw. That is my main reason for preferring the French tools and techniques. I cut all different kinds of marquetry but I do it all with my chevalets.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Phil32

579 posts in 319 days


#4 posted 08-31-2018 08:15 PM

Here is an example of classic marquetry combined with relief. The marquetry was done by a young Italian that I met in Todi, Umbria in 2003. He asked me to carved the lizards crawling over the objects on the desk. The piece is based on “Reptiles,” a lithograph of M.C. Escher in 1943.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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EarlS

2869 posts in 2764 days


#5 posted 08-31-2018 11:17 PM

Phil – that’s really cool.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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Phil32

579 posts in 319 days


#6 posted 08-31-2018 11:52 PM

Here’s another piece of marquetry by the young Italian I met in Todi – 24” x 30” This caught my eye in a shop window and led to the collaboration on Escher’s “Reptiles.” This one is called “Belvedere” and is an impossible structure.
Impossible? Trace the columns from bottom to top.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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