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Forum topic by Betsy posted 04-03-2008 03:44 AM 1266 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Betsy

3393 posts in 4505 days


04-03-2008 03:44 AM

Why is a set of wooden planes called “A half set of hollow and rounds”? – if it is a whole set why is it called a “half-set?” I’ve tried to find an answer on the internet——but to no avail.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine


21 replies so far

View Mike Lingenfelter's profile

Mike Lingenfelter

503 posts in 4723 days


#1 posted 04-03-2008 05:12 AM

A full set of hollows and rounds is generally 18 planes each. They are numbered 1-18. Starting at 1/16” increasing by 1/16” as you increase plane number. Generally a half-set includes only the even number planes. A full set is 36 planes 18 rounds and 18 hollows. A half set is half that 18.

I just found this document on Lie-Nielsen's web site. It describes things pretty well.

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4054 posts in 4673 days


#2 posted 04-03-2008 06:09 AM

You’d have to expect a gentleman whose avatar is a LN to have the low-down on this. I never have heard the term,
but I’m heading over to take a look. Thanks, Mike. If I do get to head to Seattle this summer to visit Dorje, I’ll try and get the opportunity to shake your hand.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over two decades.

View rikkor's profile

rikkor

11295 posts in 4484 days


#3 posted 04-03-2008 11:13 AM

This place is an absolute fountain of knowledge. It never ceases to amaze me.

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Scott Bryan

27250 posts in 4431 days


#4 posted 04-03-2008 12:12 PM

Good question. And good answer, Mike. I was clueless but now I know and that is what this community is about.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 4377 days


#5 posted 04-03-2008 12:16 PM

i’ve never even heard that term before and great answer mike. since i like hand tools and need hand planes now if any one mentions that to me i’ll know. this site is just full of great knowledge!

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Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 4572 days


#6 posted 04-03-2008 01:22 PM

Thanks Mike. I must have missed that big chunk of info along the way. I knew they came in sets but didn’t know how many were in a set.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

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johnjoiner

160 posts in 4503 days


#7 posted 04-03-2008 04:43 PM

Nice find, Mike.

Your link, though, isn’t working in my browser. I think this link might work better.

Following from that document over to the Clark and Williams website I see that they will make a half set of hollows and rounds for under $2500! Mike, have your ordered your half set yet? ;-)

-- johnjoiner

View Mike Lingenfelter's profile

Mike Lingenfelter

503 posts in 4723 days


#8 posted 04-03-2008 04:56 PM

Sorry about the link, looks like my cut & paste got messed up. Thanks John for the correct link.

I had only just come across this information, because I was looking into some hollows and rounds. I looked at Clark and Williams and yes they are pricey and no I have not order them yet :). I think they will have to wait awhile, maybe a long while.

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DannyBoy

521 posts in 4475 days


#9 posted 04-03-2008 04:57 PM

I had to do some looking to figure out what you meant just by “hollow” and “round”. I think I figured it out, though.

Correct me if I’m wrong, by “hollow”, we are talking about the blade being concave which in turn produces a rounded edge on the board. By “round” we are talking about the blade being rounded which would cut the concave shape in the wood. Both of these apply specifically to molding planes.

(I bet everyone reading already knew all that… hope I got it right!)

-- He said wood...http://hickbyassociation.blogspot.com/

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 4606 days


#10 posted 04-03-2008 06:00 PM

I’m not sure, but in my mind the convex plane/cutter creates the “hollow”, while the concave cutter creates the “round.” I’ve always thought they’d would named for what profile the plane creates in the wood – so that’d be the opposite of what you are thinking.

Can somebody clarify that for us??? Are the planes named for their cutter profile or the resultant profile on the molding?

And Douglas – if you do get out here we’ll definitely have to get together with Mike too!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

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DannyBoy

521 posts in 4475 days


#11 posted 04-03-2008 06:26 PM

I just happened to find this subject in a book I checked out from the library called “Traditional Woodworking Handtools” by Graham Blackburn.

Chapter 26 states in Fig. 257 that “The round plane cuts a hollow profile.” & “The hollow plane cuts a round profile.”

-- He said wood...http://hickbyassociation.blogspot.com/

View Mike Lingenfelter's profile

Mike Lingenfelter

503 posts in 4723 days


#12 posted 04-03-2008 08:01 PM

Dorje, I always assumed it was the shape of the plane iron, but now I have to make sure. Looks like DannyBoy my have the answer, but I’ll check some of my books too.

View johnjoiner's profile

johnjoiner

160 posts in 4503 days


#13 posted 04-03-2008 08:53 PM

I’m at work and can’t check any books. But I think the molding planes that cut more specific profiles like ogees, ovolos, etc. are named for the shape they cut. But the hollows and rounds are the opposite.

-- johnjoiner

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3393 posts in 4505 days


#14 posted 04-04-2008 12:50 AM

I knew someone here would come through. Thanks for the information.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

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Chris

1880 posts in 4600 days


#15 posted 04-04-2008 01:10 AM

This is the kind of post I just love; Questions like these that I have wondered about myself.

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

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