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Forum topic by ChicksWithTools posted 08-11-2018 06:57 PM 703 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ChicksWithTools

50 posts in 1039 days


08-11-2018 06:57 PM

I was hoping to get started on a gate building project this weekend but all the wood at Home Depot is green and holding has too much moisture. Drying outside in the Southeast where we shovel humidity not the best idea either, especially since it’s been raining a lot.

So, I have 2 choices at the moment: air conditioned wood shop (that I keep about 76 so it’s not too expensive) OR maybe in the attic where I could probably cook an egg if I had a metal plate up there.

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs


14 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2220 days


#1 posted 08-11-2018 07:20 PM

For a out door gate I see no reason to have super dry wood. In fact it will probably dry enough as your working with it.
Good luck.

-- Aj

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LesB

2134 posts in 3865 days


#2 posted 08-11-2018 07:29 PM

You did not say what type of wood you were using. On the West coast cedar us usually used for gates and fences and it is almost always sold “wet”. The only problem with building a fence or gate with wet wood comes from shrinkage that can occur creating gaps between the boards (if it is a solid fence) otherwise go ahead and build it.
If it is a solid face on the gate you could let the boards for a few days by spreading them out in a covered space; garage or carport to reduce the shrinkage after the construction.

-- Les B, Oregon

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ChicksWithTools

50 posts in 1039 days


#3 posted 08-11-2018 07:35 PM

Pressure Treated Pine

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs

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ChicksWithTools

50 posts in 1039 days


#4 posted 08-11-2018 07:39 PM

I am making a gate that slides out and acts as a gate for this open space to keep the dog either in or out, depending.

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6231 posts in 1135 days


#5 posted 08-11-2018 08:08 PM

I would think moisture does not matter in this case :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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ChicksWithTools

50 posts in 1039 days


#6 posted 08-11-2018 08:20 PM

Isn’t there a dry out period before painting, even on outdoor applications?

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1908 days


#7 posted 08-11-2018 08:25 PM

Going out on a limb here.

I wouldn’t paint pressure treated. It might take it but I’d guess not too well. I’d opt for regular construction lumber at the least.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6231 posts in 1135 days


#8 posted 08-11-2018 09:32 PM



Isn t there a dry out period before painting, even on outdoor applications?

- ChicksWithTools


sorry I didn’t know you were going to paint it I would just use regular wood then with good coat of primer first then paint of your choice then this wood should be dry enough … but yes PT I like to let it sit out 1 YEAR BEFORE SEALING :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5457 posts in 2774 days


#9 posted 08-11-2018 09:36 PM

One, for outdoor application, air dry is good enough. Two, pressure treated lumber is for ground contact, so for a gate it is not needed. Three, when drying lumber the slower the better, trying accelerate the process leads to warp, twist, honey comb and a host of other sins.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View msinc's profile

msinc

567 posts in 926 days


#10 posted 08-12-2018 12:41 AM

We have high humidity also here in southern Maryland….I think I would build it out of treated if for no other reason than to keep the stupid bumble bees from drilling holes in it. I would go ahead and build it, as suggested above and let it hang there for at least the rest of summer and into the fall. Just before it starts to get cold you can hit it with some kind of water sealer. Thompson’s works as good as anything. I don’t know about paint…come to think of it I don’t really remember ever having to paint anything that was pressure treated.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6274 posts in 2688 days


#11 posted 08-12-2018 01:57 AM

Here’s my question. Have you already purchased the PT lumber and do you still have the receipt? If so return it! PT lumber has only one purpose/use prevent deterioration between lumber and the ground or concrete. It’s the worst wood out there for anything. Return it if you can and buy some beech or other tight grain wood that takes paint well. Also stay away from cedar as it’s sold really wet and will warp and shrink like the dickens.
Buy a good grade of primer and a good quality paint with good UV protection for a good grade of lumber. Also expect to repaint every couple of years! From the looks of your photo your gate will be getting a lot of sun. That’s going to be the hardest factor on your finish.

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

155 posts in 1666 days


#12 posted 08-12-2018 02:50 AM

I do not mean to be disrespectful to anyone and their opinions, but some must not have experience in the SE. Any wood that is commonly available (except PT) will rot down here. That includes most 1X PT if it is on or in the ground, it is marked NOT FOR GROUND CONTACT. This especially holds true where two surfaces are attached together and do not dry well.
My answer to the original question is.
Try to find PT that has been on the shelf a while and is somewhat dry, then let it dry well once in place and paint with a good quality house paint. It will last longer than the dog, trust me.

View msinc's profile

msinc

567 posts in 926 days


#13 posted 08-12-2018 05:00 AM

I would like to know where all this “wet” cedar is being bought and sold…..I mill a lot of cedar, I have my own saw mill. I sell a lot of cedar, but none of it is sold wet. Maybe we are talking about a different kind of cedar {eastern red???? like what is used to make cedar chests}. The cedar I know and mill/sell is one of the few trees that logs will actually dry a lot if left in the uncut log form. Most other logs will lay there and rot before it even tries to dry.
I sometimes get it where someone cut a tree down and left it set for a while, then bring it or sell it to me. I find it mostly dry when I mill it needing very little drying time. I know just about all the sawyers around here and they all deal cedar the same way. I guess if I had some that was wet and you absolutely had to have it I will definitely sell it to you. We have to be talking about a different species of cedar…I have milled and cured many a board foot of cedar and what I know as cedar doesn’t tend to warp and shrink as it dries either.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1399 posts in 1238 days


#14 posted 08-12-2018 10:08 PM

I ordered premium kiln dried pressure treated lumber to replace the porch railing and posts on the front of my house. It was still a little wet and I wasn’t in a rush to get the job done. I stickered it in my hot garage for a month before using it. I painted the railing and posts immediately after installing them with regular latex house paint. That was 4 years ago. The porch looks as good today as it did then except for a little mildew on the surface that had to be washed off this spring using a commercial house wash.

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