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Forum topic by Karda posted 08-05-2018 10:56 PM 754 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1574 posts in 972 days


08-05-2018 10:56 PM

Hi, I have a tear out question, I have a dry hemlock blank I am working on, never worked hemlock before. I am getting some bad tear out on the bottom. The worst of it is on a knot. The pictures are the best I can get by shear with my bowl gouge. Should I fill the knot now or wait until I have the final shape thanks Mike

scraping


19 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#1 posted 08-05-2018 11:08 PM

Mike – can you put the lathe on slow and hold a belt sander to it
with maybe a 40 grit belt just to get past the knot issue ?

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1577 posts in 2149 days


#2 posted 08-05-2018 11:40 PM

Mike, if you have some thin super glue, flood the knot, and use accelerator to speed up the cure. when you think it’s cured, start your cut. It you notice liquid forming on your tool rest, or a burning sensation in your eyes, you didn’t wait long enough for the glue to cure. Anyway, the glue will stiffen up the knot to where it could be a nice feature when done if it’s not too messed up. You could even fill it with shavings while applying the glue.
The tearout on the bottom looks like you could sharpen your tool, and proceed slowly across the knot and grain change. ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Karda

1574 posts in 972 days


#3 posted 08-06-2018 05:45 AM

thanks Jerry -John I might have to do the 40 grit, I would rather learn to cut right than said but you do what you got to. I turned it to shape and things don’t look so bad. I am going to super glue the knot, I was hopeing it was in better shape but the wood is dry.

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John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#4 posted 08-06-2018 12:20 PM

I don’t use very much CA glue like a lot of folks here do. I prefer epoxy.
but, I have been using the disk type Flap Wheels that go on the 4” angle grinder
for a variety of turning issues – wood or metal with very good results.
this is a step up from the belt sander in aggressiveness and maneuverability.
just another tool in the wood turners arsenal. [YMMV]

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2672 posts in 2553 days


#5 posted 08-06-2018 12:28 PM

While not crazy on design of your bowl, good time to learn how to shear scrap to remove tear out. Had similar problem with dry Poplar several years ago. Would use combination of coffee grinds & CA glue on that knot!

-- Bill

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

670 posts in 1720 days


#6 posted 08-06-2018 01:51 PM

I agree with Bill on the used coffee grounds. Should blend in with the knot and not be noticeable at all.
The other area with torn grain I would give a good wash coat of thinned shellac to help stiffen up the fibers (1 pt shellac and 2 pts DNA). I’m a little surprised you are getting that much tear out with a sheer scrape with a bowl gouge.
This is how Lyle Jamieson describes the sheer scrape. You may already do the same.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDIvtr7StuA

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Lazyman

3536 posts in 1806 days


#7 posted 08-06-2018 03:31 PM

Stabilizing the knot or pecky areas with superglue or even epoxy can help but the key is using your bowl gouge correctly to make a shear cut, especially with a gouge with an Irish or Ellsworth grind. Basically, you have to ride the bevel and take the lightest cut possible. Even then, you may have tear out in the end grain. I find that more speed, not less. yields a better finish. When all else fails, I have had good luck wet sanding with Howard’s feed and wax. Start with 80 or 100 grit and work your way up the the grits to at least 220. You may have to wipe down with mineral spirits between grits to remove the slurry that forms. One of the other benefits of the wet sanding is that there is no dust to breath.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Karda

1574 posts in 972 days


#8 posted 08-06-2018 09:38 PM

thanks, how would you design the bowl differently, I am in kind of a rut. I like the ogee shape better than the bowl shape but there s gotta be more i”m just not seeing it. What grit disk would you suggest for use on an angle grinder. I’ll try the shellack. I am going back to the shear scrape videos. Thanks mike

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John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#9 posted 08-06-2018 10:51 PM

Mike – the flapper sanding wheels come in grits from 40 to 220.
just feel of them when you go to the store to see what will work for you.
the different types are for: Ceramic Tile, Metal Blending, and Wood. about $4 each.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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Nubsnstubs

1577 posts in 2149 days


#10 posted 08-06-2018 11:55 PM

Mike, make an ogee bowl with a foot with that chunk of wood. You might lose the knot, but what you have there screams ogee footed bowl. Like this .
Here is the bottom.

If you go with the flap disc, stay with the 40 and 80 grits. I found that 120grit and higher will load the disc quickly and start to burn the wood. That is sanding while the wood is rotating, so, if you were sanding a stationary piece, your results might vary…........ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Karda

1574 posts in 972 days


#11 posted 08-07-2018 01:11 AM

ok thanks John

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

670 posts in 1720 days


#12 posted 08-07-2018 01:39 AM

One thing that helped me to start was a catenary curve which someone suggested.
If your lathe is a mini/midi then a normal 8.5 X 11 sheet of graph paper is probably large enough.
Since you know the width you just have to decide on the depth. Two push pins and a short length of chain allows you to see the curve you will have. I think a simple curve may be easier than an ogee to start with.
The pic shows a catenary curve of various depths given the same width.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Karda

1574 posts in 972 days


#13 posted 08-07-2018 02:20 AM

Jerry that is a beautiful bowl. I try that on the next one. I finished the out side profile and got it where it can be sanded, I don’t want to screw it up. I try to make it better but make it worse. One reason my bottoms are wide is because I usually use a recess instead of a tenon. I am gona make a picture file of designs I like I’ll start with the one you posted. Thanks for the sanding disk suggestions Mike

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3536 posts in 1806 days


#14 posted 08-07-2018 08:32 PM

If you want to try something new, check out Mike Peace's video on turning a 9” bowl from a 4” log. It is fairly easy. Just take your time. The hardest part is removing the tenon at the end but I just cut it off with a flush saw and use a hand plane to clean it up.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Karda

1574 posts in 972 days


#15 posted 08-07-2018 10:21 PM

thanks for John for this tips on the discs. I am watching the Mike piece video now. I got the out side finished, it looks like crap. It looks like it has been smeared with some thing brown, I know it is a little darker near the big knot. It just looks dirty. should I cut the finish off and redo.

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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