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steel pivot hinges, question

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Forum topic by jdh122 posted 08-02-2018 02:50 PM 352 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jdh122

1078 posts in 3237 days


08-02-2018 02:50 PM

I have a set of these pivot hinges (model A on this page):
http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware/Page.aspx?p=40990&cat=3,41241,41267

I want to use them to hang a small door on a cabinet but I can’t quite figure out if they’ll work with an inset door. I think they will but am not sure (never been very good at 3-D mental modelling). Before I take the time to make a mock-up door and frame to check, I thought I’d see whether anyone can confirm or deny based on personal experience or smarts…

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests


5 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

1417 posts in 3269 days


#1 posted 08-02-2018 04:01 PM

I’ve never used ones like them, but can’t see why they would not work. You’ll have to fuss with the gaps and perhaps round the hinge side edge of the door a bit. I had a stereo cabinet with a glass door with nearly the same type of pivot hinges, but the glass was very thin of course.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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CaptainKlutz

1496 posts in 1914 days


#2 posted 08-02-2018 05:20 PM

Works perfect for inset door.

If door gap is large enough that metal tab on top and bottom are visible from front, easy to install.

If want very small door gap, then need to mortise the plates into the top & bottom of door panel. Do not forget that either the back/inside or hinge edge side of mortise must expose the mounting plate, so you can install hinge into pivot pin mounted in frame, and then SLIDE door between the mounting plates and screw the plates to door panel. Having back side of mortise open is little easier to install, but you can leave only the door edge open and then slide door onto the plate, for an all most invisible installation.

Best Luck.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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jdh122

1078 posts in 3237 days


#3 posted 08-02-2018 05:33 PM

Thanks for these helpful responses. I’ve made the door but haven’t fit it to the opening yet. I was assuming I should put the mounting plate on the frame and the pin in the door, but that’s a good tip to do it the other way. Think I’ll try to hide the plates…

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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CaptainKlutz

1496 posts in 1914 days


#4 posted 08-02-2018 06:01 PM



Thanks for these helpful responses. I ve made the door but haven t fit it to the opening yet. I was assuming I should put the mounting plate on the frame and the pin in the door, but that s a good tip to do it the other way. Think I ll try to hide the plates…
- jdh122

You can mount the plate on frame, just means you have to mortise the face frame instead door to have a small door gap. If you want hinge hidden, assembly task is much harder with mortised face frame. DAMHIK

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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splintergroup

2728 posts in 1642 days


#5 posted 08-02-2018 06:25 PM

I used the Brusso version of these hinges for my jewelry armoire project doors. I used a FWW article for a “how-to” on installing them and everything went fine. Not the easiest thing to do but not the hardest either 8^)

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