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Forum topic by EdsCustomWoodCrafts posted 08-01-2018 05:59 PM 899 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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EdsCustomWoodCrafts

928 posts in 1762 days


08-01-2018 05:59 PM

Hi All

I am wondering if I was to start buying hand planes what would be a good one to get

I can only get 1 right now and I’m wondering what is the most versatile I plan on using it for

1. Shooting wood
2. Planing surface to remove tool marks

I have been looking at a #4

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown” . Come check out my website for more about what I make and how at www.edscustomwoodcrafts.com


19 replies so far

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

986 posts in 969 days


#1 posted 08-01-2018 07:20 PM

Probably a 5 or 6 jointing plane would work for you. Others that are more experienced will b along soon and can give you better advice tho.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16141 posts in 3037 days


#2 posted 08-01-2018 07:26 PM

A jack plane, or “jack of all trades” #5, is the most versatile (and common) bench plane out there. I’d suggest starting there. Ultimately it’d be practical to have three bench planes (smoother / #3/#4), jack (#5) and jointer (#7/#8).

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

220 posts in 416 days


#3 posted 08-01-2018 07:33 PM

A number 5 is the most versatile plane for shooting and for general flattening. A 6 is a good choice too but not as versatile as a 5. Don’t buy a cheap hardware store special though. I always recommend buying old Stanleys off of EBAY. If you are patient, you can get a good old trusty one and tune it to perfection. Check out Patrick’s Blood and Gore for the inside skinny on old Stanleys. www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0a.html

I have been rescuing them for years and for the money you really can’t do better. You have to be ready to rub off some rust and sharpen some steel though.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

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LittleShaver

554 posts in 1038 days


#4 posted 08-01-2018 07:56 PM

I have 30 or 40 planes, but the old #5 I picked up at a garage sale for $3 some 35 years ago gets the most use. Had to make a new tote and spend some hours getting it tuned up, but it has probably been my best value tool purchase ever.

-- Sawdust Maker

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JCamp

986 posts in 969 days


#5 posted 08-02-2018 12:46 AM

Try timetestedtools.com
The owner is DonW. He’s a forum member and a extreme wealth of information. He’s tools on the site are usually sharpened and ready to go to work

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1325 posts in 858 days


#6 posted 08-02-2018 01:02 AM

For whatever it is worth, you can shoot edges with a low angle block plane if you want. I usually flip my bench hook over which gives me a version of a quickly made shooting board. I lay my plane on it’s side right on the bench up against the side of the board and shoot the edge of whatever I need to. Not too much special about all that. Just need to get the edge straight, smooth, and to the correct angle. A NO 4, 4 1/2, 5, 5 1/2 all work. My Millers Falls 56B does surprisingly well on end grain.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1905 days


#7 posted 08-02-2018 01:15 AM

In need of a home. They are house trained and ready to roll. PM if interested.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1976 posts in 2313 days


#8 posted 08-02-2018 02:07 AM


I can only get 1 right now
- EdsCustomWoodCrafts

You will throw that rule out the window once it arrives.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6266 posts in 2684 days


#9 posted 08-02-2018 06:27 AM

What the Colonel said!

Out of the 50 or so plane I had my 60 1/2 block plane seems to get the most use. My #4 or 4 1/2 are next in the rotation.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2357 posts in 2408 days


#10 posted 08-02-2018 12:35 PM

You will not end up with just 1, so dont start there. For smoothing a 4 or 4-1/2. I prefer the 4-1/2 due to the wider iron, and the iron, breaker, and lever cap swap with a 7, used for jointing and flattening panel glue ups. The 7 can be used for shooting but requires a long runway and shooting board- a 4-1/2 can work. I rarely use my 5, it is for rough work and I use machines for that. Everone should have a 4, look at what Paul Sellers does with one. You might find this info helpful here and here

View Don W's profile

Don W

19248 posts in 2986 days


#11 posted 08-03-2018 11:20 AM

Good luck with the one plane rule.

Starting with a #4 isn’t a bad idea. It really doesn’t matter which you get first, you’ll be looking for the others soon enough.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View AESamuel's profile

AESamuel

95 posts in 1641 days


#12 posted 08-03-2018 01:05 PM

For your needs a No. 4 sounds good. It will be easier to set up for smoothing than a number 5 due to less work needed to get the sole flat. I used a number 4 as my only plane with no machine tools for about a year before buying a low angle jack to go along with it (I was preparing rough stock, dimensioning, shooting and smoothing with my no. 4 – it really is a very versatile plane, more than people usually give credit).

For someone looking to get an all round plane I usually recommend a low angle jack with two irons. One standard 25 degree bevel and one high angle for smoothing tough grain.
However, that’s assuming they are doing everything with it. If you’re just smoothing tool marks then you will get great (if not the best) results with a number 4.

I also highly recommend checking out Paul Sellers on YouTube, he does the vast majority of his work with a number 4. Check out his older videos too; his channel is a wealth of information on planes.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16141 posts in 3037 days


#13 posted 08-03-2018 01:36 PM



For your needs a No. 4 sounds good. It will be easier to set up for smoothing than a number 5 due to less work needed to get the sole flat.

- AESamuel

Sorry, but this makes no sense. A jack plane, or #5 in the Stanley world, does not need to be lapped or flat to get great results for ‘jack’ operations. A smoothing plane rarely needs lapping to work well either. Use the plane first, lap if needed, but it likely (if it’s a decent quality plane and not a “Handyman” or “Defiance” for example) will not need to be lapped. That activity is overdone IM very HO.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5452 posts in 2770 days


#14 posted 08-03-2018 01:48 PM

I can only get 1 right now

Get a No. 5, it is the most versatile. Once you get one others will start showing up, they become attracted to one another. A good second choice is a low angle block plane, and then onto the smoothers, before you know it you will have a dozen or more.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Don W's profile

Don W

19248 posts in 2986 days


#15 posted 08-03-2018 06:19 PM

It’s proof there is more than one right answer. I’ll never understand the “get a #5 first” answer, but it seems to work well for some.

Most of today’s first time bench plane usage is 90% or more smoothing, and nothing does smoothing better than a smoother.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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