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Forum topic by hjt posted 07-31-2018 03:26 AM 847 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hjt

904 posts in 3558 days


07-31-2018 03:26 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer tear out

I decided to use my jointer for the first time in years. I was not happy when it tour out the bottom end. What is the best way to prevent this??

-- Harold


14 replies so far

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Aj2

2321 posts in 2217 days


#1 posted 07-31-2018 04:01 AM

Well it looks like you were passing the end grain of that board over the knifes. And a piece split off the end just like splitting firewood.
If you absolutely need to joint boards on their ends chamfer the trailing edge.

-- Aj

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John Smith

1880 posts in 582 days


#2 posted 07-31-2018 12:01 PM

X2 with AJ

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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waho6o9

8674 posts in 2996 days


#3 posted 07-31-2018 12:21 PM

Good idea on the chamfer, never heard of that, thanks AJ.

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000

2859 posts in 1319 days


#4 posted 07-31-2018 01:32 PM

X4

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bondogaposis

5453 posts in 2771 days


#5 posted 07-31-2018 02:23 PM

A jointer is not really designed to joint end grain. There are lots better ways to square up the end of a board.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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AAL

80 posts in 1846 days


#6 posted 07-31-2018 02:41 PM

Also, you could tightly apply tape along the end edge to be planed & have it wrap tightly around the end of the board. Combine this with light cuts & you should be good to go. You could also tape another (sacrificial) piece of wood to the edge of the board on the exit side of the cut.

-- "Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

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hjt

904 posts in 3558 days


#7 posted 07-31-2018 05:21 PM

I’m confused.

Bondo – are you referring to the direction of the grain as I ran the board? The grain is running vertical to the table

AAL – I ended up using a push stick as a sacrificial board. that worked but not the easiest thing to do on that jointer.

AJ what do you mean – If you absolutely need to joint boards on their ends chamfer the trailing edge.

-- Harold

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johnstoneb

3115 posts in 2592 days


#8 posted 07-31-2018 05:41 PM

Yes you were jointing end grain. To joint end grain under power or with hand planes you need to chamfer (cut a slight angle) on the edge. Using a push stick as a sacrificial board sound dangerous. A chmferon the trailing edgekeeps the last bit of wood away from the cutters and prevent the chipping.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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Aj2

2321 posts in 2217 days


#9 posted 07-31-2018 05:52 PM

Can’t think of a reason to joint the end grain of solid wood. But if you like doing it that’s cool with me
I have straightened out edges of plywood on my jointer,at the cost of nicking the knives badly.

-- Aj

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Jack Lewis

452 posts in 1498 days


#10 posted 07-31-2018 06:35 PM

Take a 4-6” cut then reverse ends and do a complete. Takes a little longer but that will releive the end grain that splits out.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1905 days


#11 posted 07-31-2018 07:37 PM

I just crosscut on a table saw and block plane it. End grain in jointer sounds scaryish.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2378 days


#12 posted 07-31-2018 07:50 PM



I just crosscut on a table saw and block plane it. End grain in jointer sounds scaryish.

- TheFridge

+1 – end grain should not go on a jointer. Also, make sure your knives are sharp, that would help a lot. But for that edge, crosscut is the way to go. You joint a face, then an edge. Plane the second face, cust the second edge. After those are complete, crosscut the two ends (end grain).

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

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enazle

66 posts in 427 days


#13 posted 08-13-2018 04:33 AM

Mr. Lewis is sharing the proper way to joint end grain. Joint the trailing edge first a couple inches, then spin the board 180 and joint the leading edge until you reach where you jointed the trailing edge and lift the board before you reach the end. You might hit it with a sanding block to true it up.

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1905 days


#14 posted 08-13-2018 05:44 AM

Not disputing that. It does sound like a good way to tear knives up quickly.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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