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Diamond stone question

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Forum topic by Brett posted 07-30-2018 02:01 AM 864 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brett

56 posts in 611 days


07-30-2018 02:01 AM

Hey fellow woodworkers!

I recently bought a set of diamond stones from bestsharpeningstones.com. It seems to be a nice set (3 stones: 300, 600 & 1200 grits).

I’ve sharpened a few chisels with them and they work well. I’ve noticed however that the 1200 grit stone has some scratches in it. Is this normal? I’ve tried contacting customer service 3 different times but no one will get back to me which is very disappointing as they say they guarantee their stones for life.

Anyway, here is a pic of the scratches. Should I continue to try and contact the company or is this normal?
Thanks!
-Brett

EDIT: Updated picture with arrows for some of the deep scratches. These scratches concern me as it almost looks like the diamonds have been scratched off and the scratches are shiny in certain light.


13 replies so far

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AAL

80 posts in 1845 days


#1 posted 07-30-2018 02:08 AM

Yes!

-- "Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

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Brett

56 posts in 611 days


#2 posted 07-30-2018 02:09 AM



Yes!

- AAL

Yes it’s normal or yes I should continue to contact customer support?

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Brett

56 posts in 611 days


#3 posted 07-30-2018 12:55 PM

Anyone else have a take on this? I updated the picture/post.

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AAL

80 posts in 1845 days


#4 posted 07-30-2018 01:13 PM

Assuming you’ve sharpened chisels before and have a reasonable technique, the stone appears to be a defective; it shouldn’t scratch like that unless you intentionally are trying to stone an edge corner with the edge gouging the stone. Frankly, I can’t see you or anyone doing that. If it scratches so easily after first purchasing it, what will happen to it in the future? I would return it for a refund.

-- "Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

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bilyo

735 posts in 1521 days


#5 posted 07-30-2018 02:22 PM

As mentioned above, diamond stones can be scratched. For instance, if one tries to sharpen a badly damaged chisel edge, a large burr may gouge off some of the diamond chips as you picture. However, if the stone was like that when you got it, then I would continue trying to contact them for a replacement. Having said that, the scratches should not effect normal use as long as the rest of the diamond chips remain properly bonded to the backer plate.

BTW I’ve found that using a honing solution ( like this) is helpful in making a diamond stone a little more effective and helps to prevent the backer plate from rusting.

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Brett

56 posts in 611 days


#6 posted 07-30-2018 02:51 PM

Thanks all!

View Lemwise's profile

Lemwise

91 posts in 1036 days


#7 posted 07-30-2018 11:15 PM



BTW I ve found that using a honing solution ( like this) is helpful in making a diamond stone a little more effective and helps to prevent the backer plate from rusting.

- bilyo

WD40 works just as well. No need for “special” honing solutions.

View Don W's profile

Don W

19248 posts in 2986 days


#8 posted 07-31-2018 02:02 AM

Some honing solutions will ruin some diamond stones. Typically you’ll want to just use water or glass cleaner. Most honing solutions are for oil stones. The one Lemwise listed is NON petroleum based, so it should be ok. Just make sure you know what you’ve got.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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MrRon

5567 posts in 3662 days


#9 posted 07-31-2018 04:53 PM

Was the stone scratched when you got it? If so, it may have been a returned item.

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bilyo

735 posts in 1521 days


#10 posted 07-31-2018 06:18 PM


WD40 works just as well. No need for “special” honing solutions.

- Lemwise

Sorry to digress from the OP’s question, but I think he got an answer.

My only point was that I think using some fluid “like” what I linked works better. I think there are as many different opinions on what to use as there are different stones. For diamond stones, water works OK, but there is the risk of the plate rusting. I’ve used WD40 and it works well, but I’ve found that it evaporates quickly so that you need to keep applying more. Buck Knives recommends not using oil on diamond stones. (here ). Others you can find on the net recommend not using “hardening” oils as they will eventually gum up the stone. Mineral oil sometimes cut with mineral spirits or kerosene are used by some.

So. I have tried the honing solution. It seems to work well. It is easy to clean up leaving no oily mess and isn’t much more costly, if any, than some other products. To each his own.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1905 days


#11 posted 07-31-2018 11:28 PM

Are you sure it wasn’t from previous stones?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Thole's profile

Thole

5 posts in 848 days


#12 posted 08-02-2018 03:51 PM

My immediate thought is that some large diamonds broke loose when you first started using the stone and plowed along the stone leaving those scratches. That would account for your observations that the scratches are shiny. You can see some images of this happening here: https://scienceofsharp.wordpress.com/2015/09/28/diamond-plate-break-in-part-2/

These scratches are much longer than I would expect though. I’m also not sure I understand whether these scratches were there when you bought it or if they developed after you used the stone. Either way I would probably want to return it.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1494 posts in 1913 days


#13 posted 08-02-2018 04:48 PM

Hmm…
Yes, these are somewhat normal, though they look deeper than what I have seen?

FWIW –
Long deep scratches like those shown are often created by corners of tool being sharpened during a push stroke on stone. These can be reduced/eliminated by only using pull stroke for initial sharpening, which ensures the entire front edge of tool is flat to the stone, and one corner is not digging into the sharpening stone. Once the bevel angle is established across entire edge, then pull & push strokes can be used.

These scratches are easy to make IF the tool mounted in a honing guide is not perfectly square with existing edge (AKA tilted or rotated). I have commonly seen this alignment problem with Eclipse style guide sold by many places such as this one when chisel has bevel running from tip to handle and/or edge is tapered.

These scratches can also be created by overly enthusiastic feed speed while sharpening that might not keep the honing guide and blade parallel to top of stone at all times.

Often this kind of damage is entirely eliminated when sharpening edges free hand (IE not using an edge guide) as you can usually feel the corner/edge grab more quickly and stop moving.

PS – There are already many threads on honing fluid options for diamond stones. My only comment is before you buy an expense commercial product, read commercial MSDS carefully and you find many are made from something you already have in your shop, like mineral spirits (solvent based) or glass cleaner (water based).

Cheers!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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