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Is this really zebrawood?

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Forum topic by MiguelDamas posted 07-30-2018 12:37 AM 909 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MiguelDamas

10 posts in 449 days


07-30-2018 12:37 AM

Topic tags/keywords: zebrawood guitar

Hello everyone. First time poster here so hopefully this is in the right section.

I am considering purchasing a stunning guitar body I found on eBay that is listed as being made of zebrawood, but it doesn’t look like any zebrawood I’ve ever seen in the sense that it has a lot more black / dark areas.

Since a picture is worth a thousand words, here it is:

I’m hoping you guys can help me ID it and suggest finishing supplies. All I want is to give it a nice matte clear coat that hopefully doesn’t darken it very much.

Thank you in advance.

BR,
Miguel


26 replies so far

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bondogaposis

5542 posts in 2864 days


#1 posted 07-30-2018 12:48 AM

No, It does not look like any zebra wood I’ve ever seen. If I had to hazard a guess I would say that it is dyed Douglas-fir.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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TheFridge

10859 posts in 1999 days


#2 posted 07-30-2018 12:56 AM



No, I does not look like any zebra wood I ve ever seen. If I had to hazard a guess I would say that it is dyed Douglas-fir.

- bondogaposis

Ditto. It’s not zebra.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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BurlyBob

6516 posts in 2778 days


#3 posted 07-30-2018 01:39 AM

+3. I totally agree with Bondo about the dyed Doug fir.

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Ripper70

1325 posts in 1422 days


#4 posted 07-30-2018 02:08 AM

Not real zebra wood:

Not a real zebra:

Real zebra wood:

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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MiguelDamas

10 posts in 449 days


#5 posted 07-30-2018 02:27 AM

Thanks all.

So how dense is Douglas-fir? Is it similar to any of the more commonly used woods for guitars like mahogany, alder, swap ash, maple, rosewood, etc?

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waho6o9

8771 posts in 3090 days


#6 posted 07-30-2018 02:34 AM

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TarHeelz

66 posts in 2594 days


#7 posted 07-30-2018 03:08 AM



Thanks all.

So how dense is Douglas-fir? Is it similar to any of the more commonly used woods for guitars like mahogany, alder, swap ash, maple, rosewood, etc?

- MiguelDamas

They’re all wood so there’s that.

-- Tar Heelz, Durham, NC USA

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oldnovice

7499 posts in 3881 days


#8 posted 07-30-2018 04:03 AM

Doesn’t look like zebra wood to me either!
The last photo by Ripper70, post #4, is real zebra wood.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Ripper70

1325 posts in 1422 days


#9 posted 07-30-2018 06:03 AM



Thanks all.

So how dense is Douglas-fir? Is it similar to any of the more commonly used woods for guitars like mahogany, alder, swap ash, maple, rosewood, etc?

- MiguelDamas

I think some of the early Telecasters that Leo Fender made were from pine or fir. It might make for a nice tone, though I think the neck probably plays a bigger role in overall tone. It doesn’t look as if there’s any kind of finish on that guitar body. Nitro cellulose lacquer is most commonly used but getting a good finish may be a challenge without the proper tools.

My concern would be purchasing that guitar body form someone who claims it’s Zebra wood when it’s obviously not. Who knows what you might end up with. I suppose if the price is really right you’re not risking much by giving it a shot.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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MiguelDamas

10 posts in 449 days


#10 posted 07-30-2018 12:55 PM


I think some of the early Telecasters that Leo Fender made were from pine or fir. It might make for a nice tone, though I think the neck probably plays a bigger role in overall tone. It doesn t look as if there s any kind of finish on that guitar body. Nitro cellulose lacquer is most commonly used but getting a good finish may be a challenge without the proper tools.

My concern would be purchasing that guitar body form someone who claims it s Zebra wood when it s obviously not. Who knows what you might end up with. I suppose if the price is really right you re not risking much by giving it a shot.

- Ripper70

Thanks. The price is pretty low ( around $90) so if it doesn’t sound good I’ll just hang it on the wall and look at it. My only concern is how it will sustain, but then again different pieces of the same wood can vary wildly in how they vibrate so no point in over thinking it before I assemble the guitar and give it a spin.

The body is unfinished. I’m leaning away from nitro due to the yellowing effect which would darken the light bits and reduce that nice contrast.

Does anyone have any recommendations in terms of matte clear finishes that won’t age?

Thanks everyone.

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3238 posts in 4040 days


#11 posted 07-30-2018 01:16 PM

If I were to put all the time and effort into making a guitar, I would be sure that the body I start with is the best I can find and afford. A good way to do this is to make it yourself. If that is not possible, find a more trusted seller.

If this person is not being honest about the wood species, how can you trust anything they say? Maybe this body is only 4” long!

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

510 posts in 3707 days


#12 posted 07-30-2018 01:21 PM

$90 for a piece of dyed doug fir? Wow, where can I get in on that?

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pontic

697 posts in 1122 days


#13 posted 07-30-2018 01:50 PM

Pine and Doug fir are not the best of tone woods for guitar bodies. I don’t thing that the early Broadcasters or Telecasters were made of them. They were pretty much made of alder wood when they came on the market. Maybe some of Leo’s prototypes were made of pine but not the one’s that went to market. There is too much resin /pitch in the conifers to make real good guitar bodies. Also the bridge and neck mounts will work loose pretty fast.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

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Ripper70

1325 posts in 1422 days


#14 posted 07-30-2018 02:00 PM


My only concern is how it will sustain…

Sustain is more a function of the stiffness of the neck, the quality and material of the nut and the type of bridge used and how the bridge is attached to the guitar.

I’m leaning away from nitro due to the yellowing effect which would darken the light bits and reduce that nice contrast.

A guitar with a thin nitro finish will have better sustain than one with a poly finish. If it’s tone/sustain you’re after, the yellowing effect will be of minor importance by comparison.

There are a few members here that build guitars. It might be worth touching base with them and picking their brains. Loren and Patrick Jaromin are two that come to mind.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

254 posts in 1288 days


#15 posted 07-30-2018 02:00 PM

Inform the lister thats its being misrepresented,its Dug Fir as others have said.

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