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Rip blade for 6/4 stock

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Forum topic by dubem175 posted 07-29-2018 03:59 PM 585 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dubem175

5 posts in 357 days


07-29-2018 03:59 PM

Hello,

I just bought a new table saw Dewalt DWE7480. 15 amp 4800 rpm motor

I need a good ripping blade to use mostly to cut 6/4 thick planks and also 4/4. Having a smooth glue line is not a criteria as I can use my planer to get rid of saw marks.

I know some saw blades are designed for underpower table saw (thin kerf?). Mine is a portbale table saw with I guess acceptable power should I look for a ripping blade design for underpower saw or a regular blade to rip 6/4 stock?

Should I look for a thin kerf or full kerf?

thanks

MArtin


12 replies so far

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1496 posts in 1914 days


#1 posted 07-29-2018 04:29 PM

The Freud LU87R010 thin kerf rip blade works well on my under powered 1.5HP contractor saw for ripping thick hardwood. Feed speed for thick lumber is significantly faster than Freud 30 tooth rip blade designed for 4/4 lumber, or Forest WWII 30 tooth they suggest for ripping.

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8297 posts in 3795 days


#2 posted 07-29-2018 04:48 PM

Definitely go with a decent 24T TK…..LU87, Infinity 010-124, CMT ITK Plus P10024, Freud Diablo D1024x, Irwin Marples 1807366, DeWalt Precision Trim DW7127PT, etc.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2939 posts in 1360 days


#3 posted 07-29-2018 04:54 PM

I picked up an Everlast Combo blade and can’t say enough good things about it. It is every bit as good and maybe even better than the Forrest WWII blade I have and half the cost. Leaves a glue ready cut. I purchased it locally at a machine reseller when looking at a jointer. They sell them at the same price Amazon has them for. Probably sticking with these Everlast blades.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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dubem175

5 posts in 357 days


#4 posted 07-29-2018 08:38 PM

I forgot to say in my initial post I need to crosscut 6/4 plank also.

Well someone told me I rather buy a good combination blade. Otherwise I would need to change blade each time I want to crosscut. He said a good combination bldae will allow good ripping and also good crosscut.

That’s what builtinbkyn is telling in his post. What do you think about it? I do woodworking as a hobby, don’t have a lot of boardfoot to rip and while I will do more rippinfg than crosscut I think I will not enjoy changing blade each time.

DO you agree with builtinbkyn using a combo blade would be better choice? Any other good combo blade recommandation

thanks

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knotscott

8297 posts in 3795 days


#5 posted 07-29-2018 09:18 PM

The choice is yours. Increasing the tooth count will add more resistance, heat, and strain to the motor. It will likely be fine for smaller volumes, but it will struggle more, making the need for a 3/32” thin kerf blade even more important. Some of those 24T blades do have an ATB grind, which might be acceptable for crosscuts, depending on how fussy you are about it. A decent rip blade only adds ~ $30 to the equation. If you go with a separate 60T crosscut blade and a 24T ripper, you’ll get optimium cutting performance and longer edge life, along with longer motor life on your saw, though it will require more blade changes (which can be done in about 60 seconds on most saws)

To jump to a 40T or 50T general purpose/combo blade, I’d look to the same brands…just switch the model # to the appropriate 40T blade. Freud LU86/LU83, Diablo D1040x/D1050x, CMT ITK Plus P10040, DW7140PT, Infinity 010-150, etc.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4043 posts in 2408 days


#6 posted 07-29-2018 09:37 PM

I do not use combo blades. For the thickness of wood and your saw, a good rip blade will work much better. A rip blade is designed to do just that and a combo blade designed to do both things but neither as well as a single purposes blade. But if the time to change blades is too much of an inconvenience then use the combo.

View dubem175's profile

dubem175

5 posts in 357 days


#7 posted 07-29-2018 09:47 PM

OK your comments helped me a lot. I will buy two blades, one for ripping (24T) and one for crosscut.

For crosscut on my table saw, based on what Knotscott said I should buy a general purpose blade (40T/50T) ? 60T like Freud LU88 is for miter saw ?

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knotscott

8297 posts in 3795 days


#8 posted 07-29-2018 10:50 PM


OK your comments helped me a lot. I will buy two blades, one for ripping (24T) and one for crosscut.

For crosscut on my table saw, based on what Knotscott said I should buy a general purpose blade (40T/50T) ? 60T like Freud LU88 is for miter saw ?

- dubem175

A 40T or 50T blade might be acceptable depending on your requirements, but a good 60T crosscut blade will leave less tearout than a 40T or 50T, plus will be much better in plywood/sheetgoods if the need ever arises. If all else is equal, more teeth tends to equate to a cleaner cut, but with more heat and tendency to burn in thicker ripping (not a concern if you get a 24T ripper for those tasks). The LU88 is an excellent choice IMO and is well suited for your task….the Freud Diablo D1060x is very similar for less money, but with a bit less carbide, meaning fewer resharpenings. If you’re going to spring for two blades, I’d definitely get a good 24T and a good 60T.

Tips for Picking Saw Blades

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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dubem175

5 posts in 357 days


#9 posted 08-01-2018 12:34 PM

Ok fine
just a last question

I have cuts to do of the four sides of a small panel just like you could see in this video (move to 4:00)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3m--wxoE2CM

Panels I have to cut are maple 1 1/4 thick
blade angle is 10 degree

What blade woud you use? 24T for the long side and 60T for the shorter side?
Or same blade (40T or 50T) for all four sides?

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knotscott

8297 posts in 3795 days


#10 posted 08-01-2018 07:10 PM

I’d probably go with the 24T. You’d need to do some sanding anyway, and the slightly rougher cut from the 24T will be easier to sand out than any burning that might be caused by the 60T.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2378 days


#11 posted 08-01-2018 07:41 PM



OK your comments helped me a lot. I will buy two blades, one for ripping (24T) and one for crosscut.

For crosscut on my table saw, based on what Knotscott said I should buy a general purpose blade (40T/50T) ? 60T like Freud LU88 is for miter saw ?

- dubem175

Good decision. 6/4 stock on that saw would be tough with a combo blade, a rip blade will be much safer. Resistance can make things dangerous quickly, especially when the mood starts to move during the cut.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

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dubem175

5 posts in 357 days


#12 posted 08-02-2018 11:31 AM


I d probably go with the 24T. You d need to do some sanding anyway, and the slightly rougher cut from the 24T will be easier to sand out than any burning that might be caused by the 60T.

- knotscott

24T even for the crosscut sides?

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