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getting a good on a jointer

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Forum topic by bruce47 posted 07-28-2018 12:59 PM 983 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bruce47

7 posts in 3001 days


07-28-2018 12:59 PM

It is probably me as the operator but when I run a piece through my jointer the knives seam to grab the end of the piece at about 1.5 inches from the end removing more material and leaving me with a bad edge. This happens on my surface plainer also but I find that if I lift up on the piece at the end it does not happen. What am I doing wrong?


10 replies so far

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Robert

3436 posts in 1899 days


#1 posted 07-28-2018 01:33 PM

Its called snipe. Depending on the machine you may not be able to totally eliminate it, but most of it can be adjusted out or, like you’re doing, alter your technique.

On your jointer its most likely due to the out feed table too low.

On the planer, if you have bed rollers, adjust them lower that will help.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Aj2

2321 posts in 2217 days


#2 posted 07-28-2018 01:34 PM

Outfeed table too low raise up a very small amounts till it’s gone.

-- Aj

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bruce47

7 posts in 3001 days


#3 posted 07-28-2018 02:10 PM

Thanks for the help guys. I had another old jointer that had an aluminum bed and do not remember having this problem. The jointer I have now is a Rockwell that was given to me by my brother-in-law and I am sure that he did not know how to set it up. Don’t know why I switched other than the cast iron but I really did like my other machine. I will see if I can make the adjustments on both machines to give me good cuts.

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jmos

916 posts in 2788 days


#4 posted 07-28-2018 02:37 PM

If you have a decent straightedge that will stand up on edge, place it so that it is mostly on the outfeed table, but hangs over the cutterhead. Then, with your hand (do not turn the jointer on!) rotate the cutterhead toward the infeed table (clockwise from the front.) The blades should drag the straight-edge toward the infeed table just a bit, maybe 1/8” or less.

If the straight-edge moves a lot more than that, your outfeed table is too low (or the blades are set too high). Raise it until it just moves the straight-edge.

If you can turn the cutterhead and the straight edge does not move at all, the outfeed table is too high, and should be lowered.

Ideally, each point on each blade should move the straight-edge the same amount, as all the blades should be set at the same height all the way across, and the same for each blade. Hard to get perfect, but that’s the goal.

All this assumes you have co-planar tables; which is another can or worms,

-- John

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Andybb

1932 posts in 1022 days


#5 posted 07-28-2018 05:33 PM

An easy fix for the planer is to just slide another board into the planer directly behind the stock you are planing. Lots of youtube vids on ways to reduce snipe like this one.

The jointer is a whole other issue and harder to fix as the other responses show. The one thing that has fixed my jointer snipe is to set the cutter heads even with the tables once they are co planer. There are lots of vids and postings about how many mm a straight edge should move when the blades touch it but that never worked for me. My blades and tables are all dead nuts even.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2377 days


#6 posted 07-28-2018 06:03 PM

Above comments addressed it properly.

Make sure not to put too much pressure on the last 4” of the infeed side of the material. Sometimes in an effort to match pressure on the outfeed table, you will put too much pressure on the infeed and actually angle the board into the cutterhead some.

In your case, it is almost certainly the outfeed table being too low or blades set too high.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

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Andybb

1932 posts in 1022 days


#7 posted 07-28-2018 07:43 PM


Make sure not to put too much pressure on the last 4” of the infeed side of the material. Sometimes in an effort to match pressure on the outfeed table, you will put too much pressure on the infeed and actually angle the board into the cutterhead some.
- BroncoBrian

+1 Yes. If the board is flat little or no pressure is needed on the infeed side, especially after a few passes. For that last 4-6 inches put the pressure (which is more just holding the board flat rather than pushing down on it) on the outfeed side. It is a power tool but it requires some finesse and practice once the tables are aligned.

Let us know how it turns out.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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bruce47

7 posts in 3001 days


#8 posted 07-31-2018 03:01 PM

Thanks for all your help. I am getting much better at it. I’ve done some adjusting and now a little more practice and I should be almost a professional.

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mlkary

9 posts in 342 days


#9 posted 08-13-2018 11:14 PM

I have an old 1980’s Ingram Jointer made in Tiawan. I had to replace the bearings in it recently and decided to give it the once over. I found the out feed table was about .0.25 – .030 low on the very end. I found some good titorials on the internet about fine tuning the tables on jointers. A quick summary: Bring the infeed table level with the out feed table (knives hidden) and check 2 things – 1) place 2 aluminum roofing squares back to back and butt them togother above the cutter head. You should not see any gap at the top or bottom. Check at 3 spots across the cutter head. 2) this is where almost all jointers with adjustable out fee tables have issues. Take a 4 – 6 foot level or staight edge and place it across the infeed table and let it extend to the end of the out feed table while keeping it flat on the infeed table. At the end of the outfeed table check the gap between the level and the outfeed table – .025 low is not unusual. I took a floor jack and a piece of 2×4 and jacked the outfeed table up where it was flush with the straight edge. You will find the slack is in the ways on the out feed table. I took some 12 guage copper wire and flattened it in to a taper and drove it with a hammer between the out feed table and the base on the bottom on both sides. Let the jack down and you table should be level. This took all the snipe out of my longer boards. You may need to check knive height afterwards. Hope this helps.

-- Mike, Pearland, TX

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Aj2

2321 posts in 2217 days


#10 posted 08-13-2018 11:55 PM

Mike that’s a very cool tutorial on leveling out saging jointer tables
I like your ingenuity

-- Aj

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