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Salad Bowl Finish screw up

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Forum topic by PhillyChopSaw posted 07-27-2018 04:02 PM 845 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PhillyChopSaw

21 posts in 879 days


07-27-2018 04:02 PM

I just made a cutting board. the finish is: First coat 1/2 mineral, 1/2 salad bowl. Second, the same. 3rd, light sand with 600, then the same.

I just did the sanding part with 600 grit, felt that was safe. Now I can see sanding scratches in the final finish. This has happened to me on other pieces also. I don’t get how i could possibly be messing this up. Anyone?

-- Dust Collection @my house: roll all your power tools outside, cut, roll everything back inside, hope for rain.


26 replies so far

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2374 days


#1 posted 07-27-2018 04:11 PM

Are you sanding by hand? Could you be pushing too hard?

600 grit should not leave marks unless you have pressure points.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1323 posts in 2368 days


#2 posted 07-27-2018 04:20 PM



I just made a cutting board. the finish is: First coat 1/2 mineral, 1/2 salad bowl. Second, the same. 3rd, light sand with 600, then the same.

I just did the sanding part with 600 grit, felt that was safe. Now I can see sanding scratches in the final finish. This has happened to me on other pieces also. I don t get how i could possibly be messing this up. Anyone?

- PhillyChopSaw

I don’t recall ever hearing of anyone mixing Salad Bowl finish with mineral oil. Salad bowl finish is a curing oil-based finish. Mineral oil is a non-curing finish. Generally you use mineral oil for cutting boards and then refresh the oil periodically.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6265 posts in 2682 days


#3 posted 07-27-2018 04:21 PM

Your stressing to much, It’s a cutting board. It’s going to get beat up as it should. Just remember this quote, “It just adds to it’s rustic charm.” Keep telling yourself like I do every time I do something like that. Most folks never see the imperfections you and I know are there.

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PhillyChopSaw

21 posts in 879 days


#4 posted 07-27-2018 04:27 PM

*Mineral Spirits not oil.

Your probably right Burly. It just seems like on the last coat, every time this happens! I’m ready to put this project to bed already!

-- Dust Collection @my house: roll all your power tools outside, cut, roll everything back inside, hope for rain.

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Kazooman

1323 posts in 2368 days


#5 posted 07-27-2018 04:33 PM


*Mineral Spirits not oil.

Your probably right Burly. It just seems like on the last coat, every time this happens! I m ready to put this project to bed already!

- PhillyChopSaw

Oh! That makes more sense!

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1489 posts in 1910 days


#6 posted 07-27-2018 04:43 PM

Hmm,
+1 Kazooman: Never mix mineral oil with Salad Bowl Finish.

General Finish Saliad Bowl Finish is a food safe oil based film finish. It contains resins that hardens, and more than 2 coats begins to build a significant film thickness. I use Salad Bowl Finish on router bowls many times. If use 3+ coats, finish looks and behaves exactly like Arm-R-Seal Gloss poly! Like any varnish resin it also can stay soft for several days depending on ambient temp.
I would never suggest using Salad Bowl Finish on a cutting board that gets used. You can and will cut through the film and will look horrible after a few uses.

Suggest you sand the board to remove most of the existing film finish and then use only mineral oil or (one of my favorites for cutting board) Howard Butcher Block Conditioner.

For some fancy end grain kitchen boards/bowls that use many different wood types that absorb oil differently, I usually apply single coat of Tried and True Original wood finish to help seal some of end grain, then use mineral oil or butcher block conditioner as top coat. The food safe hardening oil in Tried and True helps reduce amount of water that end grain cutting board can absorb as well.

Hope this helps.

PS – Edit, not oil, but mineral spirits? Still need understand Salad Bowl Finish!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Richard's profile

Richard

11274 posts in 3449 days


#7 posted 07-27-2018 05:59 PM

Do not use Mineral Spirits/Oil on any Food Related Object. It is, to an extent Toxic for Human Consumption. The “Spirits” more so than the “Oil”.

There are specialty Oil Finishes designed for Food Items, as noted above.

Salad Bowl Finish is Oil Based and should be enough If Refreshed from time to time.

Wikipedia: MINERAL SPIRITS

“White spirit (UK) or mineral spirits (US, Canada), also known as mineral turpentine (AU/NZ), turpentine substitute, petroleum spirits, solvent naphtha (petroleum), Varsol, Stoddard solvent, or, generically, “paint thinner”, is a petroleum-derived clear liquid used as a common organic solvent in painting and as a Cleaner for metal components.

A mixture of aliphatic, open-chain or alicyclic C7 to C12 hydrocarbons, white (mineral) spirit is insoluble in water and is used as an extraction solvent, as a cleaning agent.”

Rick

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

View LesB's profile

LesB

2122 posts in 3859 days


#8 posted 07-27-2018 06:09 PM

CaptainKlutz had the best answers.
Salad bowl finish is not good on cutting boards because it builds a surface film that gets damaged when the board is used….for cutting. If the board will just be used for “presentation” of things it is ok to use as it protects the wood from stains, alcohol and acids and is easy to clean. If it wears down you can lightly sand it and apply new coats. I have a salad bowl I finished with it 15 years ago. My wife uses it frequently and it was starting to show wear. I sanded it put 3 new coats of the finish on it and it looks like new.

In stead of mineral oil I have been using walnut oil (the process type). It penetrates the wood well but does not leave a surface film (unless you put too much on), it cures (dry) unlike mineral oil that never drys or cures, and it can be reapplied as needed.

-- Les B, Oregon

View PhillyChopSaw's profile

PhillyChopSaw

21 posts in 879 days


#9 posted 07-27-2018 06:20 PM

“For actively used butcher blocks that are used for chopping and cutting, only use Butcher Block Oil (Product #15950, sold separately). “

LINK

Sort of mad at myself for not reading the fine print on the general finishes website above. Why would anyone buy this product at all?

-- Dust Collection @my house: roll all your power tools outside, cut, roll everything back inside, hope for rain.

View Richard's profile

Richard

11274 posts in 3449 days


#10 posted 07-27-2018 06:26 PM



“For actively used butcher blocks that are used for chopping and cutting, only use Butcher Block Oil (Product #15950, sold separately). ”

LINK

Sort of mad at myself for not reading the fine print on the general finishes website above. Why would anyone buy this product at all?

- PhillyChopSaw

I clicked on your LINK and received the following:

“Requested URL cannot be found
We are sorry, but the page you are looking for cannot be found. The page has either been removed, renamed or is temporarily unavailable.”

Rick

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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PhillyChopSaw

21 posts in 879 days


#11 posted 07-27-2018 06:37 PM

http://www.rockler.com/salad-bowl-finish

-- Dust Collection @my house: roll all your power tools outside, cut, roll everything back inside, hope for rain.

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

9178 posts in 2744 days


#12 posted 07-27-2018 06:55 PM

Why would anyone buy this product at all?
- PhillyChopSaw

Maybe for salad bowels?

:^p

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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PhillyChopSaw

21 posts in 879 days


#13 posted 07-27-2018 07:19 PM

HAHAHAHAHA – That was a belly laugh thanks Matt I needed that.

-- Dust Collection @my house: roll all your power tools outside, cut, roll everything back inside, hope for rain.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1323 posts in 2368 days


#14 posted 07-27-2018 07:35 PM



“For actively used butcher blocks that are used for chopping and cutting, only use Butcher Block Oil (Product #15950, sold separately). ”

- PhillyChopSaw

I agree with CaptainKlutz. Howard Butcher Block Conditioner is a great product. I gave away my twenty-first end grain cutting board last week (all gifts, never sold one) and as I always do I included a bottle of Howards along with an information sheet on caring for the board.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1932 posts in 1020 days


#15 posted 07-27-2018 07:44 PM

Step away from the mineral spirits!! Dry sand it to 600. Wipe it down with a damp rag (water). You can put it in a mineral oil bath overnight but just wiping it down should be good.

I use this on cutting boards and countertops instead of mineral oil though. Great stuff and food safe.

Product description
Size:16 oz.
An all natural, non-fading, protector of soapstone and wood. Great for slate , stone , wood and concrete counter tops. Any counter top that does not have a gloss finish . Also works great on wood bowls , kitchen items and cutting boards . It even does a good job to stop rust and make rusty surface look nice again . 8 oz cover 60 – 70 Sq. Ft. Available in 8 oz , 16 oz and 32 oz

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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