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Forum topic by Lester Greenwald posted 07-26-2018 02:43 PM 502 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lester Greenwald

7 posts in 367 days


07-26-2018 02:43 PM

I’m going to make some white ash and glass display cases for T A&M band boots for my family. I have a supply of 2”x 13/16” x 4’ boards. I have a case from my son for a pattern. The cases will be 18”square x 25” high. I have more information regarding tools etc. on my profile if you’re interested. I have two questions for this topic. Since I can’t measure the thickness of the glass on my pattern because it all is installed in slots, I called a glass shop. The clerk said that 1/8” is the most common for my kind of cases, and 1/4” for the top. Now to cut the pieces to length. I have a miter saw and an old router by Rockwell which I haven’t used in years; 1/4” collett only. Also a stamped out steel router table. Should I make a jig for cutting the grooves for the glass with it, or use a 10” blade in my table saw with a 1/8” kerf (I have an old one that looks good enough to sharpen)—carbide looks mainly ok. I know that 1/8” glass won’t go in a 1/8”slot, but I think the blade is 1/64th over. Making seven cases means 28 legs (2 pieces each) and 28 more for top and bottom frames. Hoo Boy. There is a whole bunch of other issues , but I didn’t get to my age for nothing. More later—??

-- Les, Texas, http://www. papaw2.com


11 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1889 posts in 585 days


#1 posted 07-26-2018 02:52 PM

why glass ?? it is heavy and breakage comes into question.
using Plexiglass or Lexan, you could weld the joints together with
a solvent adhesive and the 1/4” top could have flame polished edges.
just a thought.

or – are you getting the glass cases already assembled ??
a photo of the display case you have now would also help.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Lester Greenwald's profile

Lester Greenwald

7 posts in 367 days


#2 posted 07-26-2018 09:40 PM

-- Les, Texas, http://www. papaw2.com

View Lester Greenwald's profile

Lester Greenwald

7 posts in 367 days


#3 posted 07-26-2018 09:43 PM

I don’t know why the images are in landscape instead of portrait. Sorry about that.

-- Les, Texas, http://www. papaw2.com

View Lester Greenwald's profile

Lester Greenwald

7 posts in 367 days


#4 posted 07-26-2018 10:13 PM

My daughter in law is the computer guru. I don’t know how to flip an image around, but the case is on it’s side. I know what plexiglass is, I’ll have to investigate Lexan. I’ll have to ask the kids if they prefer one of them or glass.

Do you have an opinion on my question about cutting the grooves for the glass (or one of the others). Should I use the table saw or old fixed base router? How deep should I make the grooves?

I need to learn more about using this forum etc. I’m not too proud to ask questions and get opinions.

Thanks, John

-- Les, Texas, http://www. papaw2.com

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John Smith

1889 posts in 585 days


#5 posted 07-26-2018 10:33 PM

Les – several members here have made similar display cases.
for myself, I cut the groove for the glass (or plexiglass) on the table saw and 1/4” deep.
leave some wiggle room for the inserts to expand/contract with the environment.
[Lexan is more costly and not needed in this project].
go to your local glass shop and they will give you a sample of the 1/8” and 1/4” glass you will be using.
it may take two passes on the table saw to get the kerf just right.
the router setup you have will drive you nuts trying to cut consistent grooves in many boards.
but when you have the sample glass in hand, you can quickly set up for multiple cuts
that will be uniform and consistent in size.
oh – ask the glass shop to quote you TEMPERED glass for the tops.
looks like a really fun project !!!

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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000

2859 posts in 1321 days


#6 posted 07-27-2018 12:18 AM

Looks like the case has an outside frame and an inside frame acting as glass stops.
Makes sense so you can replace the glass if it ever gets broke.
That being the case, I would make outside frames, use the router to rabbet the inside edge to fit the glass depth (1/8”). Then I would make inside frames as glass stops.
1/4” glass for the top (tempered is not a bad idea)
1/8” glass for the sides.

Personally, I wouldn’t use plexiglass.

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John Smith

1889 posts in 585 days


#7 posted 07-27-2018 12:28 AM

J – that’s why you get those big bucks !!

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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000

2859 posts in 1321 days


#8 posted 07-27-2018 12:41 AM



J – that s why you get those big bucks !!

- John Smith

Don’t know about that, I always seem to be broke….

View Lester Greenwald's profile

Lester Greenwald

7 posts in 367 days


#9 posted 07-30-2018 09:40 PM

Y

-- Les, Texas, http://www. papaw2.com

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Lester Greenwald

7 posts in 367 days


#10 posted 07-30-2018 11:35 PM

Yay for John Smith and jbay! I have looked over your good information and advice, and will make the most of it. Since cutting grooves for the glass would be chancy and difficult with the table saw or the router, I will likely capture it between two frames, then secure the inner frame with brass screws. It might look all right and make the glass more acessable. How about if I ripped some of my 13/16” x 2” x 4’ stock to about 13/16” x 5/8” or 1/2” x 20”? Then use half-lap joints for the corners for strength. Since I’ll have some left over I can make the pieces a little over just to be sure. I know you can cut shorter, but you can’t cut longer. (old, old gag, but my dad taught me to appreciate pure corn.)

-- Les, Texas, http://www. papaw2.com

View Lester Greenwald's profile

Lester Greenwald

7 posts in 367 days


#11 posted 08-14-2018 08:46 PM

I’m considering making the legs of my display cases with rabbets and grooves going the long way. That would make a square corner for mortise and tenon joints,, top and bottom. My stock is 2” wide so I wouldn’t be squeezed for space. That would take a lot of passes with a dado stack, with 1/4” deep and wide, but the whole case would be strong. I need to do some tuning on my t. saw fence. The back end seem able to wiggle just a touch. The round black plastic piece that tightens on to the square frame is real hard (the saw is old). That may be normal, I don’t know. I may use a clamp to be sure it’s secure, then cut a whole bunch of pieces. I don’t have a lot of experience with this saw. A while ago I got a Microjig Gripper push block, so I may have a leg up on safety. (or not.)

Upwards and sideways!

-- Les, Texas, http://www. papaw2.com

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