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Forum topic by nickbatz posted 07-25-2018 10:49 PM 630 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nickbatz

238 posts in 497 days


07-25-2018 10:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: maple refurbishing

I need some Plastic Wood or equivalent that will match hard maple that I’m not staining, but in general what are people using?

Usually the color is off just enough to be… off.

The specific application: I’m quasi-reclaiming a 5’ x 3” thick round table top that needs a roughly 1-1/2” x 1/2” plug on the bottom edge. I’ve cut a piece of maple that fits well enough, but the chipped-off piece isn’t square so I need to fill the cracks around the edges.

I know about the sawdust-in-glue technique, but it’s not ideal and I’d rather use filler.

TIA


19 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11621 posts in 3845 days


#1 posted 07-25-2018 11:13 PM

Check out Timbermate’s selection. Their different wood colors can be blended to match. In my experience, their Maple filler is pretty darned close.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6265 posts in 2682 days


#2 posted 07-25-2018 11:14 PM

I agree with Gene. I’ve found Timber mate to be a very user friendly product.

View nobu's profile

nobu

3 posts in 357 days


#3 posted 07-25-2018 11:31 PM

I have not tried timbermate yet. Thanks guys

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

238 posts in 497 days


#4 posted 07-25-2018 11:42 PM

That looks interesting. Thanks, I’ll give it a try.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2710 posts in 3338 days


#5 posted 07-26-2018 10:52 AM

Why do you reject the “dust and glue ” idea? If you use white glue and sanding dust (Sawdust is way to coarse) you will get the best match you will ever find.

-- No PHD just a DD214

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1323 posts in 2369 days


#6 posted 07-26-2018 12:09 PM



Why do you reject the “dust and glue ” idea? If you use white glue and sanding dust (Sawdust is way to coarse) you will get the best match you will ever find.

- Jim Finn

I agree on the color match and I use the technique often. However, the “sawdust/glue” filler gives a very shiny surface that sticks out like a sore thumb if the area to be filled is of any significant size. I have used timbermate and the texture of the filled area more closely matches that of the surrounding wood. Of course, neither will provide any sort of grain match unless you get creative with other methods.

For the OP. You indicate that you need the filler because the chipped off piece isn’t square. It might be better to spend some time working on the chipped area to square up the edges so that there is little or no void requiring filling. That would give a much nicer repair in my opinion.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2838 posts in 2713 days


#7 posted 07-26-2018 12:22 PM

I always used to use Durham’s Rock Hard filler. That is pretty old school but it does have a maple colored hue to it. I agree with using some sanding dust and glue.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4551 posts in 1006 days


#8 posted 07-26-2018 01:40 PM

I use Timbermate quite often. It’s easy to use, and with some practice you can match colors and do graining so that it’s virtually invisible. However, it’s not good for situations that require a durable fill and, even with a top coat, isn’t waterproof.

When I want to do a fill that lasts, I use epoxy putty. Here’s a blog post I did a while back. Some of its elements might not apply, but all of the concepts are there.

http://lumberjocks.com/RichTaylor/blog/121721

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View Robert's profile

Robert

3434 posts in 1897 days


#9 posted 07-26-2018 02:44 PM

I use a lot of Famowood.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6205 posts in 1129 days


#10 posted 07-26-2018 03:02 PM

if you are against sawdust and glue which is a perfect match …. I also love Famowood and the can is perfect plus they also sell a thinner for it … GREAT STUFF :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7487 posts in 3784 days


#11 posted 07-26-2018 05:54 PM



Check out Timbermate s selection. Their different wood colors can be blended to match. In my experience, their Maple filler is pretty darned close.

- Gene Howe

I have to agree, I have used Timbermate for quite a few years and found it excellent in all my applications. Color mixing/ matching couldn’t be easier, water based mean’s easy cleanup, virtually no waste, and long shelf life.
One important note, it is water based so water based finishes will soften and/or remove the filler.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

238 posts in 497 days


#12 posted 07-26-2018 06:04 PM


Why do you reject the “dust and glue ” idea? If you use white glue and sanding dust (Sawdust is way to coarse) you will get the best match you will ever find.

- Jim Finn

For the OP. You indicate that you need the filler because the chipped off piece isn’t square. It might be better to spend some time working on the chipped area to square up the edges so that there is little or no void requiring filling. That would give a much nicer repair in my opinion.

- Kazooman

Jim Finn, yes, I meant sanding dust. The reason I reject it is that I haven’t been satisfied with the results! It may be my fault, but it’s always been kinda rough. I think it’s because of the way it goes on – even after sanding, the surface doesn’t blend into the surrounding wood the way filler does.

Kazooman, yes, I worked on it with a chisel to make it as square as practical, but there are limits to what I can do. The filled-in edge of the plug will be < 1/16” at the widest part, so it’s just the edge. I don’t expect it to look like there’s nothing there, but I don’t want to call attention to it by framing the plug with a color that’s not quite right!

Maybe I’ll try the sanding dust/glue technique first, then cover that up if necessary.

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

238 posts in 497 days


#13 posted 07-26-2018 06:04 PM

Thanks for al the replies, by the way. Much appreciated.

View JayT's profile

JayT

6226 posts in 2628 days


#14 posted 07-26-2018 06:12 PM

A technique I use for small gaps is to hand sand the area, letting the sanding dust fill the gaps. Then, when they are full of dust, hit them with thin CA glue. Wait for the glue to dry and sand off the excess. The glue soaks into the dust, sands off easily and leaves a perfect match. Depending on how deep the void is, it might take two or three times to get a good fill.

I’ve had much better luck with this technique than premixing wood glue and sawdust. It’s less messy and doesn’t show under clear finishes (or no finish) near as bad.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2710 posts in 3338 days


#15 posted 07-26-2018 09:03 PM


Why do you reject the “dust and glue ” idea? If you use white glue and sanding dust (Sawdust is way to coarse) you will get the best match you will ever find.

- Jim Finn

For the OP. You indicate that you need the filler because the chipped off piece isn’t square. It might be better to spend some time working on the chipped area to square up the edges so that there is little or no void requiring filling. That would give a much nicer repair in my opinion.

- Kazooman

Jim Finn, yes, I meant sanding dust. The reason I reject it is that I haven t been satisfied with the results! It may be my fault, but it s always been kinda rough. I think it s because of the way it goes on – even after sanding, the surface doesn t blend into the surrounding wood the way filler does.

Kazooman, yes, I worked on it with a chisel to make it as square as practical, but there are limits to what I can do. The filled-in edge of the plug will be < 1/16” at the widest part, so it s just the edge. I don t expect it to look like there s nothing there, but I don t want to call attention to it by framing the plug with a color that s not quite right!

Maybe I ll try the sanding dust/glue technique first, then cover that up if necessary.

- nickbatz

Using white glue and applying to void using an old gift card as a squeegee it will come out fine and not glossy. May take more than one application.

-- No PHD just a DD214

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