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Should I sand after a hand plain?

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Forum topic by ADrapper posted 07-25-2018 01:52 AM 752 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ADrapper

5 posts in 364 days


07-25-2018 01:52 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question oak plane finishing sanding

I am currently working with some European Oak. When I finish a piece I have planed with a nice sharp hand plane the wood looks fantastic. Glassy smooth, better than sanded wood.

But I seem to remember that before applying a finish, I should sand as a hand plain finish is too smooth. Am I miss remembering? And where do cabinet scrappers come into the picture?

Andrew


9 replies so far

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3721 days


#1 posted 07-25-2018 03:00 AM

If your hand plane is sharp and well-tuned, there’s absolutely no need to sand IMO.

View ADrapper's profile

ADrapper

5 posts in 364 days


#2 posted 07-25-2018 03:16 AM



If your hand plane is sharp and well-tuned, there s absolutely no need to sand IMO.

- jonah

Thanks. That is what I was hoping. It would be a shame to… scuff up a beautiful mirror finish.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2831 days


#3 posted 07-25-2018 04:13 AM

No you should not. But prove it to yourself. Take 2 pieces and plane both, sand one, the other leave as is. Use a finish on it and observe results.

I asked my Grandfather same question as a kid and did the above. Saw for myself how it looked.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1908 days


#4 posted 07-25-2018 05:09 AM

I’ve heard similar but have had absolutely zero problems with any finish I have tried. And if I did I’m pretty sure the shellac I use would cure adhesion problems anyway.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View ed13's profile

ed13

32 posts in 973 days


#5 posted 07-31-2018 09:51 PM

I asked Charles Neil this once and got a very interesting answer. Sure, the planed surface is all you could ask for, but on a more complicated piece with curves, mouldings, etc., there is a lot going on. Some surfaces will have been planed, some shaped with a shave, some scraped to shape, some cut on the router, some rasped, etc. One reason for sanding can be to bring everything to an equal state. That isn’t required, but it is something to think about when composing how you want things to look. And, if you have curves that are absolutely perfect right off your spokeshave and you plan to use dye, you might want to sand end-grain like sections with a high grit to hold back the dye on those sections to keep them from going dark.

So, my answer is that planing, sanding, filing, etc., are your artists brushes. Learn how they look and compose the piece’s appearance according to what you want.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2363 posts in 2412 days


#6 posted 07-31-2018 11:47 PM

+1 on what ed said. Also, if you never leave a tool mark of any kind and can make an entire surface look the exactly the same with a smoothing plane, then go for it. I always find some type of minor issue when i go over the surface lightly by hand with the grain with 320, which blends everything together for the perfect finish. It doesnt take much time and its much better to find those minor things before coloring/finishing. Using a trace coat with the final sand helps find things more easily.

View ADrapper's profile

ADrapper

5 posts in 364 days


#7 posted 08-01-2018 04:00 AM

Thanks for all of your help and advice.

I have just do done trial peace sanded on one side and just planed on the other. Before finishing with my homemade Maloof finish the plained side looked much better, but after four Maloof poly/oil and two wax/oil, the sanded side now looks the better, just more consistent.

Thanks again.

View BalsaWood's profile

BalsaWood

154 posts in 1581 days


#8 posted 08-04-2018 06:21 AM



Thanks for all of your help and advice.

I have just do done trial peace sanded on one side and just planed on the other. Before finishing with my homemade Maloof finish the plained side looked much better, but after four Maloof poly/oil and two wax/oil, the sanded side now looks the better, just more consistent.

Thanks again.

- ADrapper

Usually they should look about the same. Once you put finish on, people can’t tell whether it was sanded or planed. Planing the piece feels better than sanding it though; no sawdust either.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3441 posts in 1903 days


#9 posted 08-04-2018 07:02 PM

I think oil finishes do better with a sanded surface, other than that, I agree.

Same with glueing: try planed vs. non planed – they stick just as well.

I find I usually have to scrape or sand a little to remove minor plane marks, although they can be left to give an old craftsman feel to a piece.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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