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Forum topic by Jason1974 posted 07-24-2018 02:00 PM 946 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jason1974

238 posts in 716 days


07-24-2018 02:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: skill tool tip qustion models wood toys joys patterns cars trucks construction airplanes

Guys, what pattern do you think is the most challenging to do. I am looking for a model that will challenge my skills at building things from scratch and not buying kits to complete a project. I think that takes the fun out of building models.

What are your opinions.

Thanks,
Jason

-- Jason, Camden, NC -- MEASURE TWICE, CUT ONCE, THEN FORCE IT TO FIT.


12 replies so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6106 posts in 1106 days


#1 posted 07-24-2018 02:27 PM

Jason to answer your question IMHO …. I find that NO pattern would be the hardest for me …. but very possible just go unto internet and find what you like then up percentige till you like the size … then this will give you some meausurements …also look at HTL blog he is very GREAT at this making models without patterns … HOPE THIS HELPS :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Dutchy

3387 posts in 2562 days


#2 posted 07-24-2018 02:42 PM

120-Heavy lifter

118 966 Cat loader

In generel yoiu can say that the T and J models from the last years are more difficult in comparison with the older ones. The higher the number the more newer.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View Woodchuckswife's profile

Woodchuckswife

30 posts in 1704 days


#3 posted 07-24-2018 03:29 PM

THE well drilling rig on the western star truck. or the heavy duty crane. Hitrack bulldozer is right there in the bunch to. I have built all of them. some more than once. Good luck. Chuck

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GR8HUNTER

6106 posts in 1106 days


#4 posted 07-24-2018 03:30 PM



THE well drilling rig on the western star truck. or the heavy duty crane. Hitrack bulldozer is right there in the bunch to. I have built all of them. some more than once. Good luck. Chuck

- Woodchuckswife


pictures or I did not happen LOL :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5495 posts in 3637 days


#5 posted 07-24-2018 04:22 PM

I agree; a kit is not the most challenging, but it is a way to start developing skills. Once the skill has been achieved, you can then move on to developing your own patterns. I started out with kits many years ago. After a few kits (model trains), I lost interest. I now build model trains and other models at a larger scale. I use many different techniques learned over the years. As to working from a pattern, I develop my own patterns using Autocad software. I then use those patterns to build the model. I work in decimals and that hones my precision skills; I also do metal machining. I know not everyone has the tools or the will to do what I do, but to each to his/her own.

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SouthavenToyMaker

186 posts in 1882 days


#6 posted 07-24-2018 04:29 PM

The. Heavy lifter was a little challenging, pattern 120. The Garbage truck was a fun and challenging.

-- Sean

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2722 posts in 1214 days


#7 posted 09-09-2018 12:27 PM

J’1974, by the looks of the two of Dutchy’s models you have built you are well into the advanced designs.

Though I haven’t built all my purchased plans out of timber, the Gatto Grader appears the most detailed build I have encountered.

I say encountered as I import all the plans I have purchased into SketchUp to get a feel for the model and also I’m a pretend techo nerd and like playing around in Sketchup.

If you know SketchUp, here is a link to my T&J SU models and my Gatto SU models... I have deliberately left the plans out of my models due to respect of Copyright laws (actually BS, I just don’t want to go to jail). Feel free to download and navigate through them if you so desire.

PS. A belated welcome to LG… but more so to the crazy, incestuous, toy model building group…

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5495 posts in 3637 days


#8 posted 09-09-2018 04:50 PM



Guys, what pattern do you think is the most challenging to do. I am looking for a model that will challenge my skills at building things from scratch and not buying kits to complete a project. I think that takes the fun out of building models.

What are your opinions.

Thanks,
Jason

- Jason1974


You can start with any pattern. The workmanship and detail comes after you have built the basic model. Tweaking it so to speak with added on details, such as an opening hood showing a miniature engine. You can add as much or as little detail as you wish. On any models I build, I often go back and add a little more detail. To me it is a work in progress; never really finished. If I stop, it’s because I have either done all that I can do, lost interest or started a new project.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2722 posts in 1214 days


#9 posted 09-09-2018 10:40 PM

J’1974, something I failed to address in my reply was the intended audience.

I personally like the additional extras and little add ons (much as MrR prefers)... however, one thing you should consider is the intended “vehicles” parking environment.

If you intend to sell or gift it, consider the potential recipient. Everyone is driven by the urge to “touch wet paint”. If the bonnet opens, the temptation to open it will fester and uncontrollably touched till eventually it will inevitably break and you will be unexpectedly presented with the broken model to fix.

For kiddies (even older ones), keep the miniature external detail to the minimum as small parts will inevitably finish up irrecovarably in the neighbor’s vacuum cleaner… and of course you will be presented with those puppy eyes to fix it… and I don’t mean blacken the eyes…

Even with my private collection, the temptation to demonstrate moving parts to visitors increases exponentially with the number of beverages consumed… and so does the potential for OOPSIES!... and, the next day I’m presented with those blood-shot eyes to fix it.

If like me, you plan to keep it as a showpiece pheasant (under glass), moving parts are an unnecessary extra.

Finally, if your intention is solell for bragging rights, just consider that 99% of your audience would not notice the difference between a roughly made crudity or a model perfect replica during their average 10-30 second viewing. When posted on LJ, the resolution of pictures are seldom sufficient to give justice to your detailed workmanship… AND that is after you master the art of presenting pictures that wont make viewers brains fall out of their ears due to tilted head viewing… (one of my pet hates… and most times I just refuse to view a presentation whose author could get of his/her rrrs to straighten out their proud workmanship).

Having said that, the temptation to make it as complex with movable parts is a drive I associate similar to drug addiction.

Bottom line is, in the words of MrR...


..... You can add as much or as little detail as you wish…..

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Woodchuckswife's profile

Woodchuckswife

30 posts in 1704 days


#10 posted 09-10-2018 06:23 PM

Toys&joys plans are not kits.
Chuck

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2722 posts in 1214 days


#11 posted 09-11-2018 12:49 AM


Toys&joys plans are not kits.
Chuck

- Woodchuckswife


That’s only 1/2 true Chuckie... anctually 100% true but like the Ginsu knives… but wait… THERE IS MORE!.

From T&J, you can purchase either the plans (stand alone) or the plans with the kit (or just the kit by itself for those multiple same models)... The kit contains all the “non-standard” timber extras, like wheels, pulleys, pegs, dowels, rope, milk cans, slab of beer (just kidding… about the beer not the milk), etc. which is more economically packaged for specific kits than buying individually. However, with all the (at least mine) oopsies, you will stockpile these extras (which works out cheaper) and find the kits unnecessary, as you venture into the diversity of the different models… especially if you customise.

The main benefit of the kits are the wheels, however, as you get more into these models you’l probably find you’ll start making your own.

Check out Dutchy and hlt’s projects/blogs for some great examples /details on making your own “rolling thunder”.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Woodchuckswife's profile

Woodchuckswife

30 posts in 1704 days


#12 posted 09-11-2018 06:16 PM

The kits are Just the odd pic.s If you buy dowels , wheels 25 or more of each size and the wheels By the hundreds like I do, it is a lot cheaper. I buy all my wheels from a comp. in Texas. cheapest ones on the net. When I makes a model I always make 4 to 6 at a time As I sell on Esty and my web site. www.wisconsinwoodchuck.com When I make kids toys I make no less than 50 or more at a time. At the amount of wheels I use , all you would be doing is make wheels. Don’t buy the kits from toys & joys. they are way over priced in less your only making one.
Chuck

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