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American Chestnut Slab

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Forum topic by HonestlyMediocre posted 07-16-2018 01:49 PM 981 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HonestlyMediocre

27 posts in 343 days


07-16-2018 01:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I responded to a craigslist ad this weekend to a fellow selling rough sawn cherry for dirt cheap. The seller also had a little of everything on his property, including some odd wood. He showed me an American Chestnut Slab, 13/4 20”x108” that he was ready to sell. He bought it as gift for his wife (project to be an anniversary gift) that he never finished, and had shipped it out to the west coast. For the asking price I figured it was worth while even if not true American Chestnut (I full well know the story of this tree). So far as I can tell, the bark is consistent with American Chestnut and not Chineese Chestnut, and certainly none of the other tress often confused with AC.

If possible, I’d like to resell this piece now or in the future. So I’m curious if it is worth more in the raw or finished state.

Option 1:
Leave it raw and sell it. American Chestnut slabs are relatively rare anywhere, especially on the west coast. I see narrower slabs out here going for $1200 retail, so I’d think I could sell it to a warehouse for $1000-1500, assuming they could get $1500+.

Option 2:

Work with the crook and resaw the slab to bookmatch into a large, 36”x84”+, dinning table. Outside edges could be live edge.

Option 3:

The slab crooks at about 5’, so crosscut at this location. Take the straight portion and have it resawn and then book-match a dinning table that’s 6/4×36 “x60”. The remaining 4’ of slab would make a matching live-edge coffee table (12/4×20”x48”).


4 replies so far

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HonestlyMediocre

27 posts in 343 days


#1 posted 07-26-2018 02:01 PM

I’ve decided to go with option 3, make matching dinning and coffee tables. I’d enjoy having them and I can still list them for sale, probably making more money if they do sell. If they don’t sell I have some nice pieces. The dinning table should comfortably sit 6 people.

For resawing the dinning table section (relatively straight, 3”x20”x6’) should I find someone with a mill or will a good-size bandsaw be adequate for resawing?

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Steve

1283 posts in 976 days


#2 posted 07-26-2018 02:11 PM



I ve decided to go with option 3, make matching dinning and coffee tables. I d enjoy having them and I can still list them for sale, probably making more money if they do sell. If they don t sell I have some nice pieces. The dinning table should comfortably sit 6 people.

For resawing the dinning table section (relatively straight, 3”x20”x6 ) should I find someone with a mill or will a good-size bandsaw be adequate for resawing?

- HonestlyMediocre

Do you have a bandsaw with 20” resaw capacity? If you do, you’ll have to set up infeed and outfeed support for the piece.

I’d probably look around for someone with a bandsaw mill. Wouldn’t take more than 15 mins to cut it on one of them.

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jmartel

8467 posts in 2543 days


#3 posted 07-26-2018 02:11 PM

I’d find someone with a mill that knows what they are doing for that. You don’t want to mess that up. No chainsaw mills.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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HonestlyMediocre

27 posts in 343 days


#4 posted 07-27-2018 07:19 AM

Steve, I don’t have a bandsaw myself. There’s a fine arts school local to me that I can rent space for day-use with a 20” Laguna, but this probably cutting it too close on clearance. It sounds like finding someone with a bandsaw mill is a better solution. There are plenty of folks here in the PNW with mills, I’m sure I could get someone to cut it for a minimum rate—I’ll go that route.

jmartel, I agree, no alaska mills on this one. I’m always amazed by anyone that is willing to cut boards with one of those setups, it’s a lot of work.

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